Archive Page 3

15
Apr
15

The Sho’a Remembered


[Starting this evening and continuing through tomorrow at nightfall, we commemorate Yom Hasho’a, Holocaust Remembrance Day. most Holocaust survivors are gone and the remainder are dying fast, I thought I should re-post something I wrote in 2010. CS]

In a world where murderous Ayatollahs want to “wipe Israel off the map” and consider this desire as “not negotiable,” in a world where there are Holocaust deniers, where European cities (in deference to Muslims living there) have decided to do away with Holocaust commemorations, in a world where schools in the UK find it expedient (in the interest of a misguided, pernicious, “Political Correctness”) to ignore important historical facts (such as the Holocaust), I thought I should post a simple story today…

There are 6,000,000 stories of those that died, I cannot tell them all! Many of these are known, most – like their protagonists and their families – have totally vanished from the human mind, from any surviving record. Some are stories of unbelievable strength, others are more mundane but all unequivocally show an unconquerable spirit. A spirit that no Nazi power could break, no enemy before, no enemy after can destroy.

Nazi German extermination camps in occupied Poland (marked with black and white skulls)

This is the Story of Rabbi Zvi Michelson, one of Warsaw’s oldest rabbi’s who at the age of 79, became just another of the 700,000 Jews killed in the death camps of Treblinka.

Early in 1942 the Germans first began their systematic raids in the Warsaw ghetto, snatching Jewish men, women and children from the warrens in which they had been “resettled” and transporting them to the extermination camps.

In the very first of these raids, the Germans aided by Ukrainian soldiers surrounded the house in which Rabbi Michelson lived, shouting through the megaphones that all those inside were to come out into the courtyard. All the Jews in the building obeyed the German command – except for Rabbi Michelson, who refused to budge. Those who would remain in their rooms, he reasoned, would soon be routed out by the German soldiers. Their travail would not last long; they would be gunned down on the spot, and their bodies would be flung into the street. There, chances were that other Jews would find them, pile them upon the carts that creaked through the ghetto alleys to collect the dead and bury them in accordance with Jewish law. Those who would go to the Germans in the courtyard, on the other hand, would be loaded by the storm troopers onto trucks and taken to the death camps. There they would die, too, but not without suffering. Even worse, from what the rabbi had heard, they would not be buried at all but cremated, in violation of the Torah. And so Rabbi Michelson prepared himself to meet death as he felt befitted a man of age and tradition. He put on his phylacteries, draped his tallith (prayer shawl) around his spare body, bolted the door of his room and waited for the Germans to come.

But things did not happen the way the rabbi had expected. Yes, the Germans, accompanied by a Jewish ghetto policeman, kicked open the door and burst into Rabbi Michelson’s room. But when the storm troopers saw the old man with the long flowing white beard standing upright before them, stern of countenance and draped from shoulders to feet in his snowy-white, silver -bordered prayer robe, they were immobilized by awe, indeed by a fear, such as they probably never knew before. Years later, the ghetto policeman, who survived the war, was to tell the end of the story. “Why, it is Moses himself!” the policeman heard one of the Germans mutter. With that, the German silently turned and led the others out of the room, slamming the door and leaving Rabbi Michelson untouched.

Alone in his little room, the rabbi could hear the babble of the crowd in the courtyard below, mingled with the raucous shouts of the German soldiers. From his tiny window, he could see the others from his house being shoved into onto huge German army trucks. And a thought far more frightening than death came to Rabbi Michelson. True, he had been granted a a miraculous reprieve. But for how long? When the Germans would recover from their surprise, they would return and shoot him. That is how he would die, and he would die alone. In effect, by refusing to leave his room he had run away like a coward; he had deserted his brethren. Which, he asked himself, was the proper alternative – to die alone, with the chance that he alone might be found by some survivors outside and be given proper burial, or go out to his brethren and be with them on their last journey? Which was the proper way to die?

It did not take Rabbi Michelson more than a moment to make his decision. He turned from the window, adjusted his tallith, and strode from the room. With firm steps, he descended the stairs and marched out into the courtyard. There he joined the others on their way to the Umschlagplatz, the assembly point from where they all were to be taken to Treblinka. He remained a source of comfort and inspiration to his brethren, and when the end came, he shared their fate. He is among the millions who have no graves, but he has a lasting memorial in the annals of valor and uprightness.

(from The Unconquerable Spirit – by Simon Zucker and Gertrude Hirschler)

Being the son of Holocaust survivors (the younger sibling of a brother I never got to meet, killed at age 3 for the heinous crime of having been born a Jew), I’ve heard hundreds of stories of unbearable horrors and indescribable courage, stories that show the greatness and the baseness of the human heart, stories that reveal deep character flaws and hidden jewels but… neither can I retell them all here nor would you, gentle reader, bear to read them all. Therefore I chose one story to stand as a monument to all the known ones and all those that shall forever remain buried… like the people who lived them…

CS

15
Apr
15

A Conversation with Trina Kaye


TrinKayThis evening, on The Kosher Scene Show, we will be talking to Trina Kaye at 10:00 pm (Eastern Time). Who is Trina? What does she do? She makes connections. As a public relations consultant, Trina Kaye regularly connects the press to her clients creating national news coverage. She also works with brand strategists to connect targeted media with multi-media branding and marketing opportunities.

Trina has lead her own consulting firm since 1992. Her client list includes culinary professionals and non-fiction authors to advertising agencies and marketing companies as well as entrepreneurs and branded personalities. They all seek Trina’s advice and expertise to reach their targeted public relations goals.

Trina has secured media placements for her clients in news outlets like The Today Show, CNN, Fox News, A&E Biography, The New York Times, Time Magazine, The Associated Press, USA Today, Time, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Los Angeles Times, and The Los Angeles Business Journal. She has also had great success with placement in consumer magazines including: Better Homes and Gardens, First for Women, InTouch Weekly, People, Cooking Light, Cosmopolitan, Southern Living, Ladies’ Home Journal, Woman’s Day and Woman’s World.

She counts a number of successful kosher cookbook authors among her clients. We will discuss her craft and ideas for budding authors.

Meanwhile, if you haven’t already done so – or if you want some great wine suggestions – why not listen to our last show with Israel Wine Direct‘s four partners: Agnes Goldberger, Naomi Hochberg, Ari Hochberg and Mayer Jacobovits.

Don’t forget to tune us in this evening at 10:00pm (Eastern Time), we will be talking with Trina Kaye; we will be waiting for you!

CS

14
Apr
15

Pizza with Artichokes


[The pizza party at 115:1pm at the Raleigh, this past motzey Shabbos, came just about the time I was starting to feel serious withdrawal symptoms, therefore since I am a passionate pizza lover, I thought I’d explore some variations on the theme. As I perused my email yesterday, I fortuitously came across the following recipe by reader Rita W, from Miami. CS]

Pizza with Artichokes

ArtichPizz

Pizza Dough

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1/2 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 1/3 cups all-purpose flour

Topping

Ingredients

  • 14 oz artichoke hearts in oil
  • 7 oz mozzarella
  • 4 tbsp olive oil (plus extra for greasing)
  • flour for dusting
  • 8 mild chilis in oil
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped parsley
  • salt and pepper

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast and brown sugar in the water, and let sit for 10 minutes. Stir the salt and oil into the yeast solution. Mix in 2 1/2 cups of the flour.
  2. Turn dough out onto a clean, well floured surface, and knead in more flour until the dough is no longer sticky. Place the dough into a well oiled bowl, and cover with a cloth. Let the dough rise until double; this should take about 1 hour.
  3. Punch down the dough, and form a tight ball. Allow the dough to relax for a minute before rolling out. Roll out to a 10″ circle.
  4. Distribute the artichokes and chilis on top. Sprinkle with garlic and half the parsley. Season with salt and pepper, drizzle on the olive oil. Put the mozzarella on top of the pizza and bake for 20 minutes. Sprinkle with the remaining parsley before serving.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

13
Apr
15

Classic Deli Pumpernickel Bread


I always liked Pumpernickel, I remember many an occasion coming home from cheder to the delicious aroma of my mother’s just baked Schwartzn Broit; therefore, considering that Passover is over and once again we can eat bread, I present a recipe I adopted from Bread: Bread, Rolls, Coffee Cakes, Quick Breads, Biscuits, Muffins, Scones and More:

Classic Deli Pumpernickel Bread

Photo from Bread, on page 9

Photo from Bread, page 9

Makes 2 loaves

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cold strong coffee *
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup molasses
  • 2 tbsp margarine
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • 2 packages (1/4 ounce each) active dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 2 1/2 cups bread flour, divided
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 tbsp caraway seeds
  • 2 cups medium rye flour
  • cornmeal
  • melted margarine (optional)

Directions

  1. Combine coffee, molasses, 2 tablespoons margarine and salt in medium saucepan; heat over medium heat to 115 to 120 F.
  2. Meanwhile, dissolve yeast in warm water in large bowl of mixer, let stand for 5 minutes. Stir in coffee mixture. Add 2 cups bread flour, whole wheat flour, cocoa and caraway seeds, beat at low speed – with paddle attachment – for 2 minutes. Add rye flour, 1/2 cup at a time; beat until dough begins to form a ball.
  3. Replace paddle attachment with dough hook. Add enough remaining bread flour, 1 tbsp at a time, if necessary to prevent sticking. knead at low speed 5 to 7 minutes o until dough is smooth and elastic.
  4. Shape dough into a ball. Place dough in greased bowl; turn to grease top. Cover and let rise in warm place 2 hours or until doubled in size.
  5. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper; sprinkle with cornmeal. Punch down down dough. Divide dough in half; shape each half into a round, slighly flattened loaf. Place on prepared baking sheets. Cover and let rise in warm place for 1 hour or until almost double in size. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  6. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until loaves sound hollow when tapped. Remove to wire racks to coll completely. Brush tops of loaves with melted butter, if desired.

* Use fresh brewed coffee or instant coffee granules prepared according to package directions.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

02
Apr
15

Talking Wine for Passover and Beyond: Israeli Wines Direct


This evening – April 2 – at 8:30 pm (Eastern Time), please tune in to The Kosher Scene Radio Show for a delightful pretaped conversation with Ari Hochberg, Naomi Hochberg, Agnes Goldberger and Mayer Jacobovits of Israel Wines Direct.

We will discuss the company’s philosophy, how different generations get along together in harmony and above all we will talk about their wine kosher wine portfolio which includes Kishor, Agur and Ramot Naftaly and food/wine pairings.

The Gang of Four, from left to right:  Ari Hochberg, Naomi Hochberg, Agnes Goldberger, and Mayer Jacobovits.

The Gang of Four, from left to right:
Ari Hochberg, Naomi Hochberg, Agnes Goldberger, and Mayer Jacobovits.

Meanwhile don’t forget to listen to our last show (if you haven’t already) with Esti Wartenberg, Brand Ambassador for Israel’s Recanati Winery.

Don’t forget to listen to an interesting, entertaining show this evening at 8:30 pm (Eastern Time) for a pre-taped conversation with Ari Hochberg, Naomi Hochberg, Agnes Goldberger and Mayer Jacobovits of Israel Wines Direct. We’ll be waiting for you!

CS

A Kosher un freilachn Peissach!
Chag kasher vesameach!

01
Apr
15

Slow Cooked Lamb with Potatoes – Kuzi de Pesah


I always liked lamb and when looking for a great recipe that uses it, what better place to find it than in a Sephardic cookbook?

From Stella’s Sephardic Kitchen (page 157) by Stella Cohen:

Slow-Cooked Lamb with Potatoes – Kuzi de Pesah

Detail of photo by: Marc Hoberman, on page 156

Detail of photo by: Marc Hoberman, on page 156

An easy one-pan lamb and potato dish which is perfect as a family meal and a chilly night. The lamb is gently simmered on the stovetop then briefly browned in the oven. Traditionally this flavorsome dish is served on the Passover dinner, paired with a green spring salad or braised green beans.

3 1/4 lb shoulder of lamb, cut through the bone into even chunks *
5 tbsp olive oil
2 onions, roughly chopped
2 fresh bay leaves
2 small sprigs fresh rosemary
sea salt and freshly ground pepper
3-4 cups hot chicken soup
2 1/4 lb waxy potatoes, peeled and quartered lengthways
3 tbsp roughly chopped flat-leaf parsley (use leaves and tender stems)

You will need:
An enameled, cast-iron, shallow oven-to-table casserole

TRIM excess fat from the lamb.

HEAT 4 tbsp olive oil in the casserole over medium-high heat. Add the lamb and cook to batches on all sides until lightly browned. Remove the lamb with long tongs and keep in a heatproof dish.

ADD the onions to the casserole and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until softened. Return the browned meat to the pan. Add the bay leaves, rosemary sprigs, and season with salt and pepper. Pour in enough hot stock to just cover the lamb. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat and simmer foe 3-4 hours or until the meat is tender, adding more hot stock as necessary. Skim the fat off the cooking juices in the pan.

MEANWHILE boil the potatoes until just tender and drain.

SCATTER the potatoes over the lamb and sprinkle with half the parsley over the lamb and sprinkle with half the parsley,. Drizzle the remaining olive over the potatoes and season with salt and pepper.

PREHEAT the oven to grill/broil 15 minutes before serving. Place in under the grill for 15 minutes or until the potatoes are golden brown. Serve at once with the remaining parsley sprinkled on top.

–xXXOoOXXx–

STELLA’S HINTS:

  • * Ask your butcher to cut the shoulder into roughly 2- 2 1/2 inch chunks.
  • Lamb chops can be used instead of shoulder, which will save cooking time.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

31
Mar
15

Talking Wine for Passover and Beyond: Estie Wartenberg


estiewartenbergThis evening, Tuesday March 31, Estie Wartenbeg (who represents Recanati Winery for Palm Bay International), will be our guest at 10:00opm (Eastern Time). We will be discussing Recanati‘s newest offerings and old favorites. Food and wine pairings and more.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, please listen to last eve’s broadcast with Our guests were Ami and Larissa Nahari the owners of The River – Fine Kosher Wines.

Don’t forget to tune us in this evening at 10:00 pm (Eastern Time) when we will be talking to Esti Wartenberg (who represents Recanati Winery for Palm Bay International),

CS 

30
Mar
15

Grape Salad


[Chef Ben Fleischman of yourkosher chef.com has once again shared one of his delicious but easy to prepare recipes. CS]

Grape Salad

PHOTO BY: BEN FLEISCHMAN

Grape-Salad

SAUCE

  • 8 ounces cream cheese
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix above ingredients together and refrigerate. Note: the sauce can be refrigerated and used until the expiration date of the cheese and sour cream.

FRUIT

  • 1-1/2 pounds green seedless grapes
  • 1-1/2 pounds red seedless grapes

Remove grapes from stem and place in bowl. Pour the sauce mixture over the grapes and stir gently to coat the grapes. Refrigerate until ready to assemble and serve

TOPPING

  • 1 cup pecans
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar

Toast the pecans on a cookie sheet at 350 for 15 minutes. Break the pecans into small pieces and place in zip lock bag. Add the brown sugar and mix. Store until ready to assemble and serve

ASSEMBLY

Stir the grape sauce to coat the grapes. Spoon into individual serving bowls. Sprinkle topping over the fruit and garnish with a sprig of mint.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

30
Mar
15

Talking Wine for Passover and Beyond: Ami and Larissa Nahari


—UPDATE!! UPDATE!! UPDATE!!—

DUE TO CIRCUMSTANCES BEYOND OUR CONTROL THIS RADIO BROADCAST HAS BEEN
RESCHEDULED TO 
MONDAY THE 30TH, 10PM (EASTERN TIME)

This evening at 10:00pm (Eastern Time) we will be talking wine once again, our guests will be Ami and Larissa Nahari the owners of The River – Fine Kosher Wines. Ami has been on our show before; for quite a while now we’ve been trying to get Larissa on the show, finally we’ve succeeded in getting them both.

Ami, Larissa and the twins

Ami, Larissa and the twins

Ami is the CEO of The River and Larissa is the company’s Marketing Director, together they form a formidable team dedicated to bring some of the best kosher wines to the American market. Please tune us in this evening, at 10:00pm (Eastern Time) for an interesting show.

Meanwhile (in case you missed it), please listen to our show from last evening with Michael Jordan from Skyview Wines and
Spirits
.

Don’t forget to tune us in this evening at 10:00pm (Eastern Time) when we will be talking to Ami and Larissa Nahari from The River. We’ll be waiting for you.

CS

—UPDATE!! UPDATE!! UPDATE!!—

DUE TO CIRCUMSTANCES BEYOND OUR CONTROL THIS RADIO BROADCAST HAS BEEN
RESCHEDULED TO 
MONDAY THE 30TH, 10PM (EASTERN TIME)

27
Mar
15

Oven-Roasted Fingerling Potatoes


The perfect, delicious, side dish for any main – whether on Passover or the rest of the year – it’s incredibly simple to make.

From Geila Hocherman‘s Kosher Revolution,  page 145

Oven-Roasted Fingerling Potatoes

Serves 6

Photo on page 145, by: Antonis Achilleous

Photo by: Antonis Achilleous

Not every delicious dish needs to be complicated. This savory side of crisp, garlicky potatoes almost makes itself. It’s the perfect accompaniment to roast meats, chicken or fish – just about any main item.I like to season these with rosemary , but see other options in the ingredient listing.

  • 3 pounds unskinned fingerling potatoes
  • 6 garlic cloves, flattened with the side of a knife
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin oil
  • Four-3-inch fresh rosemary sprigs, 4 thyme sprigs, or 1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 F. In a medium roasting pan, combine the potatoes and garlic. Add the salt, oilve oil a nd rosemary, and toss
  2. Roast the potatoes until golden , about 45 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes to 20 minutes to ensure browning. Serve.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS




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