Archive for the 'kosher' Category



07
Jun
13

Adas Bis Silq – Lentil and Swiss Chard Soup


One of our readers, Fortuna F, from Los Angeles, sent in this recipe and photo for what promises to be a superb and easy to prepare soup:

Adas Bis Silq

LentilChard-Soup

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups brown lentils
  • 6 cups cold water
  • 10 leaves Swiss chard
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped coriander leaves
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • lemon wedges for serving

Directions

  1. Wash lentils well and place in a heavy pan with the cold water. Bring to a boil, skimming as needed, cover and simmer gently for 1 hour or until lentils are soft.
  2. Was Swiss chard well and cut off stems. Cut leaves down the middle, then shred coarsely.
  3. Heat oil in a separate pa, add onion and fry slowly until it becomes transparent. Stir in garlic and cook for another 15 seconds.
  4. Add shredded Swiss chard to pan and fry, stirring often, until leaves wilt.
  5. Pour onion and Swiss chard mixture into the lentils. Add coriander, salt pepper to taste, then add the lemon juice. Cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes. Serve soup in deep plates with lemon wedgrs for squeezing into soup according to the individual’s taste. It goes perfectly with any Middle Eastern bread.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

06
Jun
13

Sautéed Chicken Breasts


This is an easy recipe to prepare and yet it’s delicious. Proof, again, that a good dish need neither be intricate nor overly time consuming to make.

Sautéed Chicken Breasts

(Adapted from The Best 30-Minute Recipe, by America’s Test Kitchen at Cook’s Illustrated Magazine)

Detail from Photo in The Best 30-Minute Recipe

Detail from Photo in The Best 30-Minute Recipe

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • salt and ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Directions

  1. Spread flour in shallow dish. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. Dredge chicken in flour to coat and shake off excess.
  2. Heat oil in 12″ skillet over medium-high heat until just smoking. Carefully lay chicken in skillet and brown well on one side, 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. Flip chicken over, reduce heat to medium-low, and continue to cook until thickest part of breasts registers 160 degrees on instant-read thermometer, 6 to 8 minutes longer.
  4. Transfer chicken to plate, civer with foil, and let rest at least 5 minutes before serving.

Cooking Tips – To cook chicken breasts correctly, the first thing to consider is size. Be sure to select chicken breasts of equal size, so they will cook evenly. Flouring the chicken prior to sautéing will protect the meat from drying out and helps prevent it from sticking to skillet. Turning the heat down when browning the second side is crucial to prevent the pan from scorching while the chicken cooks through and will avoid a leathery, stringy exterior.

I served it with a wine sauce, made from a recipe also adapted from The Best 30-Minute Recipe.

Red Wine Pan Sauce

The Base of a pan sauce is the fond, or browned bits clinging to the bottom of the skillet after sautéing or searing meat, poultry or fish. Once the skillet protein is removed from the skillet, aromatics such asminced shallots can be sautéed, and then, in a process called deglazing, liquid – usually wine, stock, or both – is added to help dissolve the fond and make a flavorful sauce. The sauce is then simmered to concentrate flavors and chicken.

Makes about 1 1/4 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 shallot, minced
  • Salt and ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup dry red wine
  • 1 1/2 cup chicken stock *
  • 1 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp cornstarch
  • 1 tbsp unsalted margarine, cut into 3 pieces and chilled
  • 1 tsp minced fresh thyme

Directions

  1. After removing cooked protein from skillet, add shallot and 1/4 spoon teaspoon salt to oil left in skillet, return to medium-high heat, and cook until softened, about 2 minutes.
  2. Stir in wine, scraping up any browned bits. Stir in 1 1/4 cup of stock and brown sugar, simmer until sauce measures 1 cup, about 5 minutes.
  3. Whisk remaining 1/4 cup stock and cornstarch together until smooth, then whisk into sauce. Add any accumulated meat juices and continue to simmer, about 2 minutes.
  1. Reduce heat to low and whisk in margarine, one piece at a time. Off heat, stir in thyme and season with salt and pepper to taste.

* Chicken Stock – Brodo di Gallina

Yield: 16 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 small bunch (about 1/2 oz) Italian (flat-leaf) parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 4 pound hen, cleaned and cut into four pieces
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 3 celery stalks
  • 1 large carrot
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 12 black peppercorns
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Directions

  1. Place the celery and peppercorns on a piece of cheesecloth, then using kitchen string, tie the ends of the cheesecloth together to make a bag.
  2. Place 16 cups water in a large pot. Add all other ingredients. Bring to a boil over medium high heat.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 4 hours, skimming the surface occasionally to catch and discard the residue and foam. Add extra water to the broth, making sure the original level of broth is maintained throughout.
  4. Drain the stock through a strainer discarding the vegetables and reserving the flesh for further use in other recipes.

The chicken stock can be refrigerated for up to 4 days or frozen up to 30 days.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

06
Jun
13

Coffee & Chocolate Panna Cottas


pancottaI desperately needed another chocolate fix this week (let me add that I started feeding my weekly chocolate habit, this past Monday at Levana Kirschenbaum‘s with some of her fabulous Chocolate Truffles; I continued with Easy Chocolate Squares), therefore I had no choice but to turn to François Payard‘s Chocolate Epiphany. Leafing through the pages, to my surprised delight, I came across an interesting dessert which I just had to try; as usual, Pâtissier Payard did not disappoint!

From page 130:

Coffee & Chocolate Panna Cottas

Serves 6

Chocolate Panna Cotta

  • 1 tbsp unflavored powdered gelatin
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 4 oz  50% chocolate chopped
  • 1/2 cup Dutch -processed cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Coffee Panna Cotta

  • 1 tbsp unflavextractored powdered gelatin
  • 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 2 tbsp instant coffee granules
  • 1  tbsp pure vanilla
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tbsp sugar

Garnish

  • 1/2 cup apricot preserves

Directions

CHOCOLATE PANNA COTTA:

  1. Sprinkle the gelatin over 2 tbsp of the whole milk, and let stand for 3 to 5 minutes. Put the chocolate in a medium bowl.
  2. Combine the cocoa powderand the sugar. Put the remaining milk and sugar mixture in a small saucepan over medium high heat, and bring almost to a boil. Whisk the gelatin into the milk, then pour the milk ovrer the chocolate. Whisk the gelatin into the milk, then pour the milk over the chocolate. Whisk until the chocolate is melted and the mixture is smooth. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a a small pitcher or a bowl with a spout, and set it aside to cool to room temperature.

MAKE THE COFFEE PANNA COTTA:

  1. Sprinkle the gelatin over 2 tablespoonsof the milk, and let stand for 3 to 5 minutes.
  2. Combine the remaining milk and the coffe, vanilla bean, and sugar in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, and bring almost to a boil. Whisk the gelatin into a mixture until combined. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a small pitcher or a a bowl with a spout, and set it aside to cool to room temperature. If using vanilla extract instead of a vanilla bean, whisk it in it now.

ASSEMBLE THE DESSERT:

  1. Pour some of the chocolate mixture into six tall, clear 4-ounce glasses, so that it fills up about one fourth of each glass. Place the glasses in the freezer to set the panna cotta, but do not let it freeze solid. This will take about 30 minutes. Then pour some coffee mixture over the chocolate one, to fill the glasses halfway. Return the glasses to the freezer to let the coffee panna coota set, about 30 minutes.
  2. Repeat the process with one more layer each of chocolate and coffee. The last layer does not need to be put in the freezer. Refrigerate the glasses until the panna cotta layers are set, about the 30 minutes, or overnight.
  3. To serve, garnish with a dollop of apricot preserves.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

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05
Jun
13

A Conversation with Ami Nahari


Nahari2Our guest this evening’s – at 10:00pm (Eastern Time) – on The Kosher Scene Radio Show is Ami Nahari. He is the CEO and Founder of The River, Ami brings 15 years of business consulting expertise, focusing on customer satisfaction, organizational structure and service management. He is the product of an elite Israeli Army unit and a graduate of the management school at Bar Ilan University, Mr. Nahari is building an organization based on values, ethics, professionalism and state-of-the-art distribution technology.

He’s been a resident of New York City since 2000, Fortune 100 companies hired his services to improve operations and processes. He borrows best practices from the High-Tech and financial industries to establish a state of the art wine distribution operation.

Ami grew up in Efrat, in Gush Etzion where he met the winemaker of the Gush wines, Shraga Rosenberg.  “After my wife, Larissa and I tasted the wines we asked him to allow us to import his wines, but he immediately declined” Ami tells, “but I kept pushing until he said yes.” Today, needless to say Shraga is very happy with the choice he made.

nahari1

The River imports Tishbi Winery, Gush Etzion Winery, Kadesh Barnea, Har Bracha Winery and soon two more wineries will be added to the family. Last year The River started working with ShiraWinery from CA, for two year in a row their products were named by the Jewish Week as Top Kosher Wine.

In case you missed it, please listen in to a fascinating talk we had with various Sotheby’s Judaica experts

Do not forget to listen in tonight at 10:00pm (10:00pm (Eastern Time)

CS

04
Jun
13

Easy Chocolate Squares


Just because something’s very easy to prepare, does not detract from the fact that it still can be delicious. If you want to start your kids or grandkids cooking with chocolate, this is a great beginning!

Easy Chocolate Squares

NoBakChocSqa

Yields: 16 squares

Ingredients

  • 9 1/2 oz dark chocolate
  • 3/4 cup margarine
  • 4 tbsp light corn syrup
  • 2 tbsp coconut flavored liqueur
  • 6 oz plain cookies
  • 1/3 cup toasted rice cereal (non-toasted rice cereal will do well in a pinch)
  • 1/2 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecan nuts
  • 1/2 cup candied cherries, roughly chopped
  • 1 oz white chocolate, to decorate

Directions

  1. Place the dark chocolate in a double boiler with the margarine, syrup, and coconut liqueur over gently simmering water until melted, stirring continuously until blended.
  2. Break the cookies into small pieces and stir into the chocolate mixture, stir in the rice cereal, nuts and cherries.
  3. Line a 7″ inch square cookie pan with parchment paper. Pour the mixture into the pan and level the top, pressing down well with the back of a spoon. Chill in the refrigerator for about 2 hours.
  4. Melt the white chocolate and drizzle over the top of the cake in a random pattern. Let it set.
  5. Carefully take out of the pan and discard the parchment paper. Cut up into 16 squares.

Enjoy!

SYR

03
Jun
13

Experiencing Wine


In February 2011, Eric Asimov wrote in the New York Times:

…most of the gaudy descriptions found in tasting notes will not help to understand the character of a bottle or to anticipate the experience of drinking it.

Photography by Irving Schild

(from his private collection)

for

The Kosher Scene

ExpWine1

While it may seem heretical to say, the more specific the description of a wine, the less useful information is actually transmitted. See for yourself. All you have to do is compare two reviewers’ notes for a single bottle: one’s ripe raspberry, white pepper and blackberry is another’s sweet-and-sour-cherries and spice box. What’s the solution? Well, if you feel the need, the urgent need, to know precisely what a wine is going to taste like before you sniff and swallow, forget it. Experience will give a general idea, but fixating on exactitude is a fool’s errand. Two bottles of the same wine can taste different depending on when, where and with whom you open them.

Wine is a moment, is a mood. A few year’s ago, Yoav Siseley (at the time the distributor of Tishby Wines), said on my radio show that if you drink a favorite wine, as you sit with good friends or a loved one, your taste buds will experience the full rainbow of flavors in that bottle; if, however, you drink that same bottle at a moment when you are upset about something, or someone, the taste experience will be very different. And then, then there is breathing time…

ExpWine4

Shortly after we first started this blog, I had a tasting session with walking wine encyclopedia, taste teacher extraordinaire, Costas Mouzouras from Gotham Wines and Liquors, in Manhattan. He had me open a bottle (among others) of a Cyprus’ wine, we tasted it and… I was not impressed! He told me to wait 15 minutes, then half an hour, then 2 hours. While the bottle remained the same, each time revealed new richer notes, the taste kept on improving until it was barely recognizable from that first sip.

John Cleese, of Monty Pithon fame, made a series of videos explaining wine to the uninitiated. In one of them, he invited various celebrities to his estate. Some knew wine, some did not. In many cases the reactions were so different the viewer had to wonder if they were all talking about the same bottle. Because, as we said, wine is a personal experience, an experience shaped by the moment, shaped by the mood.

ExpWine5

Barely a few years ago, kosher wines were of the extra sweet Concord, or extra sweet Malaga variety, almost exclusively, with an occasional sweet Tokay thrown in to the mix. Those days are now thankfully well behind us. Kosher wines come in a variety of grapes and mixes of grapes, they range from sweet to semi sweet, from semi dry to dry. There are many world class, award winning, vintages that just happen to be kosher. They come in all price ranges and there is always something to suit your taste.

Yes, you could roll the wine in your mouth – just like the experts – because they try to expose it to all the different taste sensitive parts of the tongue. At the tongue’s tip are the sweetness receptors, just a little back you’ll taste the saltiness. The sides of the tongue will tell you about the acidity or sourness while the back of the tongue will tell you of any bitterness. Yes, you could do all that or you could just relax and sip…

CS

02
Jun
13

Summer Compote


Of all the foods we eat, fruits are the most beautiful; since biblical times they symbolized the bountifulness, the riches of the land. Fruits are refreshing and healthy as a snack or as the end of a hearty meal.

Summer Compote

SummerCompote

Serves 8

  • 4 cups of water
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 4 cloves
  • sugar to taste
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 6 peaches, skinned and sliced
  • 6 plums sliced
  • 6 ripe apricots, quartered
  • 3 cups sweet cherries
  • 5 cups mixed berries such as strawberries, raspberries and blueberries

Directions

  1. Pour enough water into a large pan to cover the first batch of fruit. Add the cinnamon, stick, cloves, lemon juice, and one tablespoon sugar (taste after the fruit has been poached and adjust as necessary).
  2. Bring to a boil over high heat and and add the the peaches, reduce the heat and simmer – depending on the ripeness – for 2 to 5 minutes,, until just tender.
  3. Using a slotted spoon, gently transfer the peach slices into a large bowl, draining as much of the liquid as possible against the side of the pan.
  4. Add the nectarines to the pan and cook same as the peaches. Transfer to the bowl. Cook the apricots the same way, then the cherries, adding to the bowl as they become tender; do not overcook since the fruit continues to cook in the bowl. Add more water to the pan if necessary.
  5. Stir in the berries and swirl gently just to cover with the liquid.Simmer for 1 minute. Remove the berries to the bowl and taste the syrup in the pan. adjust the sweetness to taste. If the syrup is too thin, increase the heat and boil until thickened and reduced. Pour over the fruit, let it come to room temperature and refrigerate over night.

You’ll find it thoroughly refreshing and delicious.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

31
May
13

Rice Stuffed Tomatoes


One of my favorite summer appetizers, though I could make it at any time:

Rice Stuffed Tomatoes

RiceTomts

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 4 large tomatoes
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 cup Arborio rice
  • 6 fresh basil leaves, torn
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin oil, plus extra for oiling and drizzling
  • salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Cut a slice of the stalk end of each tomato and set aside to use as lids. Scoop the pulp out of the tomatoes and chop.
  2. Transfer to a large bowl, carefully so as to minimize any loss of tomato juices; add the garlic, rice and basil. Season with salt and pepper and stir in 1 tbsp of the oil. Cover and let stand – at room temperature – for one hour, for the rice to absorb the juices.
  3. Stuff the tomatoes with the rice mixture and transfer to an oiled baking pan. Top each tomato with the reserved lids and drizzle with remaining oil. Bake in a preheated 350 F. oven for 35 minutes, until the tomatoes are soft and the rice is cooked through. Serve warm or at room temperature.

If available (usually in gourmet fruit and vegetable stores, use Brandywine tomatoes which have a perfect balance of acidity and sweetness, for more sweetness use Spanish Montserrat tomatoes which have low acidity, but any large tomato will do. Arborio rice kernels are high in starch, shorter and fatter than any other short grown rice. They are great for risotto because the extra starch lends the dish a perfect creamy texture.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy

CS

30
May
13

Grilled Skirt Steak


Summer’s fast approaching, don’t believe me? Walk outside! Grilling time’s here and there’s nothing unusual about grilling a steak, but… the following recipe is different and scrumptious!

Grilled Skirt Steak

SkirtSteak

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 4 8oz skirt steak
  • 2 tbsp chilli powder
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup couscous
  • 1/2 large red onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick
  • 1 fennel bulb, top removed, halved, cored and sliced thinly
  • 8 radishes, ends trimmed, sliced thinly
  • 1/2 lb arugula
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin oil
  • 2 navel oranges, peeled and sliced into 1/4 inch rounds
  • 1/2 cup CS’ Olive Non-Fish Tapanade *

Directions

  1. Put the skirt flat on a baking sheet and season evenly on both sides with chilli powder, salt and pepper. Set aside so the flavors can sink in a bit.
  2. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a rapid boil over medium-high heat. Add the couscous and stir with a wooden spoon. Cook the couscous for 15 minutes or so until the pellets are al dente. Drain and cool.
  3. Preheat the outdoor grill. rub the grill with oil to prevent sticking. Grill the onion slices for 2 minutes, turning often, until charred on both sides. Remove from grill and set aside.
  4. Lay the steaks on the grill and cook, turn them with togs from time to time, to sear well on all sides. It takes approximately 8 minutes for medium rare, longer if you prefer it more done. Take off the steaks and put them on a cutting board, let them rest for 3 minutes, this will allow the juices to recirculate.
  5. Meanwhile, in a large mixing bowl, combine the couscous, grilled onion, fennel, radishes, arugula, lemon juice and olive oil. Toss to combine, add salt and pepper.
  6. Divide the salad among 4 plates. Arrange 4 slices of orange on top of each plate. Cut each steak into 3 pieces, then turn each piece sideways and cut thin slices against the grain, to ensure tenderness. Shingle the slices on top of the salad. Spoon some of the tapenade on top and serve immediately.

* CS’ Olive Non-Fish Tapenade

Yield: just over 1 cup

  • 2 cups pitted Kalamata olives
  • 4 sun-dried tomatoes
  • 2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
  • 3 pieces of tablespoon-sized grilled eggplant
  • 2 tbsp capers, rinsed and drained
  • 1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp brandy (optional)
  • 1 tsp finely ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Directions

  1. Add all the ingredients to a food processor. With the machine running gradually add the oil until the desired consistency is reached. The tapenade should be coarsely chopped. It will keep covered in the refrigerator for up to weeks.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

29
May
13

Mushroom Omelet


A good healthy breakfast is easy to prepare, and what could be than to start with an omelet? From Dropping Acid – The Reflux Diet by Jaimie Koufman, M.D. & Jordan Stern, M.D. with French Master Chef Marc Bauer:

Mushroom Omelet

(Recipe and photo on page 81)

MushOmelette2

Serves  2

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 3 domestic mushrooms, about the size of a silver dollar (washed dried, cut in half to form 2 half spheres, then placed flat side down and sliced thin
  • 4 sprigs parsley (washed dried, stems removed, chopped fine)
  • 2 tbsp water or non-fat sour cream
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • salt to taste

(Notes: * You can use any variety of mushrooms, I love the flavor of shitake musrooms, but remember to remove their tough stems.
* Mushrooms cook best in a large pan and spread in a single layer, if the mushrooms are overcrowded, the water they yield will make them boil instead of sauté)

Directions

  1. Whisk the eggs with a fork.
  2. Add the water or non-fat sour cream, parsley, and salt.
  3. Preheat an 8 inch non-stick pan on medium heat.
  4. Spray the pan with non-stick spray. Add the mushrooms to the pan and spread evenly. When they are golden brown on one side, season with salt, flip and cook the other side until tender. Reserve the mushrooms on paper to absorb excess moisture and oil.
  5. Wipe the pan clean with a paper towel and preheat on medium heat.
  6. Add most of the butter(save a bitif you need for a second omelet) and cook until it froths and turns slightly brown.
  7. Immediately add half the egg mixture. (Repeat directions for the second omelet).
  8. Let the eggs coagulate for a few seconds. Remove from heat while stirring with a wooden spoon or high-heat rubber spatula.
  9. Return to the heatand bang the pan gently on the stove to remove air bubbles. Lower the temperature.
  10. When the mixture is almost set(it should not have any color), slide the omelet to the edge of the pan. Place almost half the reserved mushrooms on the center of the omelet.
  11. Fold one third of the omelet in the middle with a non-stick spatula.
  12. Fold the other third slightly overlappingthe middle and carefully lift onto a plate.
  13. You can brush the top with a little melted butter (optional)
  14. Sprinkle with some of the mushrooms and serve toast on the side.

Repeat for second omelet.

If you prefer a parve omelet, you can use margarine instead of butter, and parve sour cream instead of the dairy one.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS




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