Author Archive for Chaim Szmidt



29
Jun
15

An Azerbaijani Grill


This past Friday, very early in the morning, I left for Shabbat – with friends – to their Eagle Lake summer home in the Poconos. This community is located about 20 minutes out of Scranton, PA., next to man-made Eagle Lake. It was a very beautiful day, perfect for barbecuing. Since we had just arrived, done some shopping, and were getting ready for Shabbat there was little time to properly marinade the meat. My hosts put me in charge of barbecuing; after checking out the pantry to see what was available and checking the refrigerator to see what kind of meat, I decided to make a rub. The meat turned out to be 3 lbs of a nice London Broil, they wanted it very spicy I was told.

Considering the limited choices I picked:

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I ended up using more than 1 bottle of some of these...

I ended up using more than 1 bottle of some of these…

CS Fast and Spicy Meat Rub

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon Herbes de Provence (for a superb aroma)
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground Lemon Pepper 
  • 1 teaspoon Steakhouse Onion Burger
  • 1 teaspoon Magic Salt Free Seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon Onion Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Meat Magic

Directions

  1. Mix well and the above quantities will yield enough rub for one skewer of pieces of meat
This is a very low and interesting Azerbaijani barbecue. It sits very low and the skewers are inserted on 5 sets of parallel grooves.

This is a interesting Azerbaijani style barbecue. It sits very low and the skewers are inserted on 5 sets of parallel grooves.

I cut up the meat into 2 inch cubes, each cube was then rubbed with the above mixture, put on a skewer and barbecued for about 7 minutes (having turned the skewers once at the 3.5 minute mark). Each skewer had 8 pieces of meat.

The first 5 out of the 7 skewers of meat I barbecued.

The first 5 out of the 7 skewers of meat I barbecued.

Between the three adults and two preteens there was nothing left!

The meat came out juicy, spicy but flavorful, and very aromatic. Shabbos day and Sunday rained non stop, but even then we ate all the meals outside in the wooden 12 ft by 12 ft gazebo, the windows were covered with mesh and plastic to keep the insects. On motzey Shabbos the temperature went down to 49F, I guess the mountains – 120 miles out of Brooklyn – are a different world. In fact, my Brooklyn allergies did not affect me even once during the three days in the Poconnos!

We saw quite a few deer throughout, and on Sunday as we were leaving back to New York we even managed to see another visitor by the community’s garbage containers…

A black baby bear, busy foraging through the garbage bags, seemingly unconcerned about the five golf cart and two vans filled with humans surrounding him...

A black baby bear, busy foraging through the garbage bags, seemingly unconcerned about the five golf cart and two vans filled with humans, armed with cameras and iPhones, surrounding him.

I wonder how far Mamma Bear was…

CS

26
Jun
15

Lunch and a Walk in Central Park North


Yesterday, SYR and I had the pleasure of having lunch with the famed Lévana Kirschenbaum at her apartment, in Manhattan’s Upper West Side. While everyone who has read this blog over the years knows of my love/hate relationship with fish (more hate than love, actually), I really enjoyed her sushi grade tuna steaks. Juicy, flavorful and without a hint of fishiness they were truly delicious!!!

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A delicious tossed salad, a cup of sake in the lower  left corner and a some tuna steaks in the back...

A delectable tossed salad, a cup of sake in the lower left corner and a some tuna steaks in the back…

Grilled Mushrooms, Grilled Zucchini and Carrot Salad...

Grilled Mushrooms, Grilled Zucchini and Carrot Salad… Fantastic!

After such a great lunch (which we capped with Lévana‘s superb Chocolate Chip Cookies) the three of us went for a walk in Central Park North…

...a wooden bridge

…a wooden bridge

Some of the Park's inhabitants...

Some of the park’s inhabitants…

Great company, great meal, great walk, great afternoon, what more can one ask?

CS

16
Jun
15

The Merchant of Venice


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David Serero, as Shylock, in a Sephardic version of Shalom Alechem.

David Serero, as Shylock, in a Sephardic version of Shalom Alechem, at the play’s opening.

Shylock:
I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands,
organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same
food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases,
heal’d by the same means, warm’d and cool’d by the same winter
and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If
you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die?
And if you wrong us, do we not revenge? If we are like you in the
rest, we will resemble you in that.

The Merchant Of Venice Act 3, scene 1, 58–68

Last week I attended David Serero‘s production of Shakespeare‘s The Merchant of Venice for the American Sephardic Federation, at Manhattan’s Center for Jewish History. Mr. Serero adapted, directed and starred (as Shylock) in this play. Taking the Bard’s words – as a departure point – he introduced some Sephardic songs into his script, with his beautiful and powerful baritone intoning the introductory Shalom Alechem and a couple of others, while Dina Desmone – as Portia – sang a Ladino love song.

Though shorter than the original play, this version (superbly acted by SereroDesmone, with James Bocock – as Antonio, Joseph Talluto – as Bassanio, and Ron Barba – as Prince of Morocco/Salerio/Duke of Venice, and Noriko Sunamoto as the piano accompanist), illustrated with strong emotions what a Jew is. Much has been argued about Shakespeare’s antisemitism, yet while Shylock is not a  very sympathetic character, his hatred is shown as nothing more than the fruit of the prevailing feelings of the day towards the Jews. Perhaps it is time to rethink the way Shakespeare thought of of us. Did he indeed see us as blind, greedy money grabbers; or did Shylock‘s portrayal serve to show up the hypocrisy and prejudice of contemporary society?

Thanking the cast, the accompanist and the audience...

Thanking the cast, the accompanist and the audience…

David Serero‘s adaptation revisualized the original in a more Jewish, yet universal, view of blind prejudice and its pernicious effect on everyone. Though William Shakespeare may never have met a Jew, in real life; though almost 5 centuries passed since the play was first written; horrible massacres were perpetrated since, for no reason other than ignorance and unbridled bigotry. The world learned little from the blood spilled, little from the devastation of war; the savagery of hatred is still alive and well as we look at events around the world…

CS

24
Apr
15

Roasted Potatoes with Horseradish Dressing


When I first moved to the US in 1962, I couldn’t understand why American Jews would limit their horseradish experience to something that is spread over gefilte fish. Growing up in Uruguay – and in keeping with my parents very European customs – we would have it with all types of meat – whether steak, roast, chicken, etc. I always loved the taste of horseradish whether red, white or in sauce form. Last eve I made this dish which I found in Earth to Table by Jeff Crump and Bettina Schorman:

Roasted Potatoes with Horseradish Dressing

Photo on page 77 in Food & Wine Best of the Best Cookbook Recipes, Volume 13, published in 2010

Photo on page 77 in Food & Wine’s Best of the Best Cookbook Recipes, Volume 13, published in 2010

Peeling fingerlings potatoes is time-consuming but well worth it – they get so crisp while roasting. A little secret: The warm potatoes soak up the creamy, tangy vinaigrette beautifully.

Serves 4

2 pounds fingerling potatoes, peeled
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive-oil
3 tablespoons dry white wine
1 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves
1 teaspoon salt
2 bunches watercress (about 10 ounces), trimmed

DRESSING
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon freshly grated
horseradish root
Salt and freshly cracked black pepper

Potatoes are something that I have planted in my garden at home. There is really something about digging a few potatoes from the cold earth with your hands. It is almost surprising to find them under the plant. Horseradish and potatoes have a real love for one another; try some horseradish on french fries.

Preheat oven to 450 F. In a medium bowl, toss potatoes, oil, wine, thyme and salt. Spread out in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake until tender, about 40 minutes.

Preparing the dressing

In a large bowl, whisk together oil, sour cream, vinegar and horseradish. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Add warm potatoes to dressing and toss to coat. Divide among 4 plates and top each with a handful of watercress.

MAKE AHEAD The dressing can be covered and refrigerated for up to 5 days.

Next time, I’ll try this with Yukon Gold potatoes, I think it’ll work well also. Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy; I certainly did!

CS

23
Apr
15

In Conversation with Brenda Laredo, Founder and CEO of Skinny Kosher Creations


BrendLarThis evening on The Kosher Scene Show, we will be talking to Brenda Laredo, Founder and CEO of Skinny Kosher Creations – at 10:00 pm (Eastern Time). Brenda has been involved in the weight loss industry for over 15 years. It all started when on a family trip to Disneyland she realized there were no healthy kosher snacks for her kids. Everything was very junky, sugary or too oily. Skinny Kosher was born.

She set out to make Mediterranean inspired shelf-stable meals with all natural products containing no chemicals or additives. These meals were produced in Israel with family recipes, a dietician, a weight loss component and with healthy in mind. The meals’ success was followed by the introduction of a line of energy bars in His and Hers versions.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, please listen to our archived show from last Thursday with Nutritionist/Dietician Beth Warren, MS, RDN, CDN. It was a fun and educational talk on nutrition and some of the myths surrounding it.

Please tune us in this evening at 10:00 pm when we will be talking to Brenda Laredo, Founder and CEO of Skinny Kosher Creations – at 10:00 pm (Eastern Time). We will be waiting for you!

CS

17
Apr
15

Chocolate Chip Cookies


We adapted this easy to make recipe from The Afternoon Tea Collection published by Metro Books in 2012:

Chocolate Chip Cookies

ChocChipCook

Makes 36 cookies

Ingredients

  • 8 oz margarine, softened
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup caster (superfine) sugar
  • 3/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 2 1/4 cups plain (all-purpose) flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 12 oz dark chocolate melts, chopped coarsely

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease oven trays. bowl.
  2. Beat margarine, extract, sugars, and egg in a small bowl with electric mixer until light and fluffy. Transfer mixture to large bowl; stir in sifted flour and soda, in two batches. Stir in chocolate.
  3. Roll tablespoons of mixture into balls, place about 2 inches apart on trays.
  4. Bake cookies about 15 minutes, cool on trays.

For dairy version you may use butter, milk chocolate or white chocolate.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

16
Apr
15

Barbara Bensoussan Makes Challah


This coming Shabbat is typically one when most people make “key or schlissel” challah. While some will bake it in a key shape, others put a key inside. I belong to the latter group, and for this Shabbat I plan to change the usual shape of my challah. This time, I will shape it as Barbara Bensoussan explains in the following video and in her book A Well Spiced Life:

Basic Challah Recipe

This is my best “Challah for Dummies” recipe. One of the biggest mistakes challah novices make is to work too much flour into the dough, since bread dough feels so sticky on the hands, but the result is a heavy loaf better employed as a doorstop. This recipe kneads the dough in a food processor, so you are less likely to make this mistake. The recipe makes one large challah, but since it goes so quickly, you can simply make one loaf, dump out the dough, and repeat the process as many times as you like. In the interests of sneaking some nutrition into my white-bread-loving children, I usually add a tablespoon of wheat germ to the dough.

2 ¼ teaspoons dry yeast (1 package) dissolved in ½ cup very warm water along with ½ teaspoon sugar
3 cups flour, preferably high-gluten
2-3 tablespoons sugar
1 ½ teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon wheat germ (optional)
1 egg
1/3 cup oil
1/3 cup water
1 beaten egg for glazing the challah; sesame or poppy seeds for garnishing, if desired
PAM spray and corn meal to grease the pans

Place flour, sugar, salt and wheat germ in the bowl of the food processor and pulse to blend.  Add the yeast-and-water mix (it should be foamy after five minutes) and process another 5-10 seconds.  Combine an egg and 1/3 cup oil and water into a small bowl; now dump this into the processor and continue processing until the mixture forms a ball around the blades of the machine—this make take 20-30 seconds (if you have a plastic dough knife for your machine, use it; if not, a regular steel blade will also do the trick).  Check the dough; if it seems tough and dry, add a couple of tablespoons of water; if it seems too wet and won’t come together, add more flour, ¼ cup at a time.

Let the dough process on a medium-low speed for one minute.  Voila!  The dough is done.  Place into an oiled bowl, turn it once, cover it with a plastic bag, and let it rise until doubled, about an hour and a half (may rise faster if your kitchen is hot).

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BarbBenssousChall

Punch it down and repeat the rising (it’s not absolutely necessary to do two risings, but I think it makes a smoother loaf).  The second rising may go faster than the first.  When doubled again, punch down the dough.  Shape into a loaf, either by braiding it or, as my mother-in-law does, by rolling it into a long rectangle from which you cut a fringe on one end and roll it up.  (I never managed to master braiding with six strands, but an easier, and also very nice, option is to divide the dough into four parts.  Braid three of them, then make a skinny braid with the fourth part.  Slice a little trough down the length of the big braid with a knife and nestle the smaller braid inside it—this will keep it from sliding off during baking, and makes a pretty double-braided shape.)  I like to use aluminum loaf pans to bake my challahs, as the high sides help them rise and maintain a more professional, uniform shape; spray them with Pam and dust with corn meal.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.  Let your shaped challahs rise at least another half hour, until almost doubled in size.  Brush with the beaten egg and top with seeds if desired.  Bake at 425 for five minutes, then reduce oven temperature to 375 and bake until golden brown, about another half hour.  For a crispier crust, take the challahs out of the pans (carefully!) for the last five minutes of baking.  When they’re done, the bottoms will sound hollow when tapped with your finger.

Variation:  Whole Wheat Challah

My husband decided he prefers whole wheat challahs, as they’re more nutritious and he finds them easier on the digestion.  It’s advisable to mix whole wheat flour with regular bread flour, as the whole wheat flour contains much less gluten and consequently will not rise very well all by itself.  You can simply use the recipe above, but substitute half to two-thirds of the white flour with whole wheat flour or even spelt flour.

A Note on Sephardic Shaping

When my mother-in-law visits us, she makes her challah in a shape I had never seen before.  Instead of braiding the dough, she manages to create a sort of striped loaf.  I soon saw how this was accomplished; she rolls out the dough into a long rectangle.  Then she cuts one of the narrow ends into a sort of long fringe.  Starting from the opposite, end, she rolls the dough rectangle into a loaf, ending with the “fringes” wrapped around the loaf decoratively.  When baked, the fringes puff into a striped pattern.

My husband was familiar with this Moroccan challah shape and immediately surmised that it must have some ancient mystical significance; perhaps there was even a specified number of stripes to cut, like those who have the custom to bake a dozen challah rolls for every Shabbat.  But when he asked his mother the reason behind this unusual shape, she merely shrugged.  “Who knows?” she said.  “I think it’s just a way of making the challah easier to slice.”  And indeed, when you bring the striped challahs to the table, the indentations between the stripes make perfect cutting guides!

Enjoy!

SYR

16
Apr
15

A Conversation with Beth Warren, MS, RDN, CDN


BethWarrThis evening at 10:00 pm (Eastern Time) we will be talking to Beth Warren, nutritionist and author of, Living a Real Life with Real Food: How to Get Healthy, Lose Weight and Stay Energized – The Kosher Way. 

Beth is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and a New York State Certified Dietitian-Nutritionist with a private practice in Brooklyn, New York. Beth holds a MS in Nutrition from Brooklyn College and a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Yeshiva University. She is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians in Integrative and Functional Medicine (DIFM) and Nutrition Entrepreneurs (NE) practice groups, New York State Dietetic Association (NYSDA) and the Society of Nutrition Education (SNE).

Beth conducts nutrition counseling in her private practice for both pediatric and adult clients. She is the nutritionist at the Morris I. Franco Community Cancer Center and the head sports nutritionist for the Sephardic Bikur Holim, a not-for-profit organization. She also works as a consultant for schools and businesses to help organize nutritious and delicious meals and snacks, perform workshops, health fairs and lectures for clients including The Macular Degeneration Association and the Sephardic Community Center.

Meanwhile, why not listen to last evening’s broadcast with book publicist extraordinaire, Trina Kaye?

Don’t forget to tune us in, this evening at 10:00 pm (Eastern Time) when we will be talking to Beth Warren MS, RDN, CDN. We will be waiting for you.

CS

15
Apr
15

Beef Brisket with Caramelized Onions


In our constant search for new recipes or variations from the traditional ones, we scour through books, magazines and the net. Here we present a brisket recipe from the Peppermill‘s The Culinary Connoisseur:

Beef Brisket with Caramelized Onions

Beef-Brisket

Ingredients

  • 1/23 cup plus 1 tablespoon oil
  • 2 1/2 pounds onions, thinly sliced, about 5
  • 1 5 pound brisket
  • 1 tablespoon paprika
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 5 stalks celery, sliced
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken stock
  • 12 ounce bottle of beer
  • 8 ounces barbecue sauce
  • 2 tablespoons of tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Heat 1/3 cup oil in a a large heavy pot over medium heat. Add onions and saute until caramelized, stirring occasionally, about 35 minutes. Slow cooking will bring out the flavor without browning too much. If they start too brown too fast, lower the heat.Transfer onions to a large roasting pan. Sprinkle brisket with paprika, salt and pepper. Place brisket on top of onions. Set aside.

In the same heavy pot heat the remaining tablespoon oil. Add celery and saute until brown, about 5 minutes. Add chicken stock to pot. Bring to a boil and scrape up any caramelized bits from bottom of the pan. Remove from heat. Add the beer, BBQ sauce, tomato paste and marjoram to pot, stirring to combine. Pour sauce over brisket. Cover tightly with foil and bake for 3 hours and 45 minutes until very tender. Uncover and let brisket stand 1 hour at room temperature.

The brisket can be prepared 3 days in advance. Cover and keep refrigerated. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Spoon off any fat from brisket and sauce. Slice meat thinly across the grain. Return to roasting pan. Transfer sauce to saucepan and bring to a boil. season with salt and pepper. Cover and rewarm until heated through. Serve brisket on a bed of onions and sauce generously spooned over it.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

15
Apr
15

The Sho’a Remembered


[Starting this evening and continuing through tomorrow at nightfall, we commemorate Yom Hasho’a, Holocaust Remembrance Day. most Holocaust survivors are gone and the remainder are dying fast, I thought I should re-post something I wrote in 2010. CS]

In a world where murderous Ayatollahs want to “wipe Israel off the map” and consider this desire as “not negotiable,” in a world where there are Holocaust deniers, where European cities (in deference to Muslims living there) have decided to do away with Holocaust commemorations, in a world where schools in the UK find it expedient (in the interest of a misguided, pernicious, “Political Correctness”) to ignore important historical facts (such as the Holocaust), I thought I should post a simple story today…

There are 6,000,000 stories of those that died, I cannot tell them all! Many of these are known, most – like their protagonists and their families – have totally vanished from the human mind, from any surviving record. Some are stories of unbelievable strength, others are more mundane but all unequivocally show an unconquerable spirit. A spirit that no Nazi power could break, no enemy before, no enemy after can destroy.

Nazi German extermination camps in occupied Poland (marked with black and white skulls)

This is the Story of Rabbi Zvi Michelson, one of Warsaw’s oldest rabbi’s who at the age of 79, became just another of the 700,000 Jews killed in the death camps of Treblinka.

Early in 1942 the Germans first began their systematic raids in the Warsaw ghetto, snatching Jewish men, women and children from the warrens in which they had been “resettled” and transporting them to the extermination camps.

In the very first of these raids, the Germans aided by Ukrainian soldiers surrounded the house in which Rabbi Michelson lived, shouting through the megaphones that all those inside were to come out into the courtyard. All the Jews in the building obeyed the German command – except for Rabbi Michelson, who refused to budge. Those who would remain in their rooms, he reasoned, would soon be routed out by the German soldiers. Their travail would not last long; they would be gunned down on the spot, and their bodies would be flung into the street. There, chances were that other Jews would find them, pile them upon the carts that creaked through the ghetto alleys to collect the dead and bury them in accordance with Jewish law. Those who would go to the Germans in the courtyard, on the other hand, would be loaded by the storm troopers onto trucks and taken to the death camps. There they would die, too, but not without suffering. Even worse, from what the rabbi had heard, they would not be buried at all but cremated, in violation of the Torah. And so Rabbi Michelson prepared himself to meet death as he felt befitted a man of age and tradition. He put on his phylacteries, draped his tallith (prayer shawl) around his spare body, bolted the door of his room and waited for the Germans to come.

But things did not happen the way the rabbi had expected. Yes, the Germans, accompanied by a Jewish ghetto policeman, kicked open the door and burst into Rabbi Michelson’s room. But when the storm troopers saw the old man with the long flowing white beard standing upright before them, stern of countenance and draped from shoulders to feet in his snowy-white, silver -bordered prayer robe, they were immobilized by awe, indeed by a fear, such as they probably never knew before. Years later, the ghetto policeman, who survived the war, was to tell the end of the story. “Why, it is Moses himself!” the policeman heard one of the Germans mutter. With that, the German silently turned and led the others out of the room, slamming the door and leaving Rabbi Michelson untouched.

Alone in his little room, the rabbi could hear the babble of the crowd in the courtyard below, mingled with the raucous shouts of the German soldiers. From his tiny window, he could see the others from his house being shoved into onto huge German army trucks. And a thought far more frightening than death came to Rabbi Michelson. True, he had been granted a a miraculous reprieve. But for how long? When the Germans would recover from their surprise, they would return and shoot him. That is how he would die, and he would die alone. In effect, by refusing to leave his room he had run away like a coward; he had deserted his brethren. Which, he asked himself, was the proper alternative – to die alone, with the chance that he alone might be found by some survivors outside and be given proper burial, or go out to his brethren and be with them on their last journey? Which was the proper way to die?

It did not take Rabbi Michelson more than a moment to make his decision. He turned from the window, adjusted his tallith, and strode from the room. With firm steps, he descended the stairs and marched out into the courtyard. There he joined the others on their way to the Umschlagplatz, the assembly point from where they all were to be taken to Treblinka. He remained a source of comfort and inspiration to his brethren, and when the end came, he shared their fate. He is among the millions who have no graves, but he has a lasting memorial in the annals of valor and uprightness.

(from The Unconquerable Spirit – by Simon Zucker and Gertrude Hirschler)

Being the son of Holocaust survivors (the younger sibling of a brother I never got to meet, killed at age 3 for the heinous crime of having been born a Jew), I’ve heard hundreds of stories of unbearable horrors and indescribable courage, stories that show the greatness and the baseness of the human heart, stories that reveal deep character flaws and hidden jewels but… neither can I retell them all here nor would you, gentle reader, bear to read them all. Therefore I chose one story to stand as a monument to all the known ones and all those that shall forever remain buried… like the people who lived them…

CS




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