Archive for January, 2011



18
Jan
11

Salt… Part 2 – Types of Sea Salt


Last week we discussed salt’s role in cooking, this time we will focus on the various types of salt. I found quite a few sites offering excellent information on salt types. Quite a few salts have risen to gourmet status because of their rarity and corresponding prices.

Among the most thorough sites explaining the many types, I found SaltWorks to be among the most informative (yes, they sell the salts themselves) for sea salts. They explain, in a simple manner, the differences among the various types. [We are NOT discussing or endorsing the kashrus of any single item listed. You have to check with the respective manufacturer whether any item is at all kosher and if  it has a reliable hechsher. CS]

French Sea Salt and Grey Salt. Photos by: http://www.saltworks.us

French Sea Salt

French sea salts are hand-harvested from pristine Atlantic seawater. Unlike most American sea salts, they are usually unrefined so they retain more of the trace minerals that naturally occur in seawater. These minerals include natural iodine. French grey sea salt, or Sel Gris, is harvested using the traditional Celtic methods. This prized process is done entirely by hand, using only wooden tools. This preserves the pure taste of the French salt, and produces a very special moist crystalline texture. Sel Gris by Le Tresor is also lower in sodium chloride content than average sea salts, generally containing anywhere from 83–87% sodium chloride. French sea salts are ideal for use on salads, cooked fresh vegetables and grilled meat. They are available in coarse grains – ideal for pinching or salt cellars, stone ground fine – an ideal replacement for processed table salts, and extra fine grain – the perfect popcorn salt (or other salty snacks).

Grey Salt

Other Names: Sel Gris

Grey salt is a “moist” unrefined sea salt, usually found in the Brittany region of France’s Atlantic coast. Its natural light grey color comes from the minerals absorbed from the clay lining the salt ponds. The salt is collected by hand using traditional Celtic methods and wooden tools. Grey salt has gained great fame in the mainstream culinary world in the last few years, and is considered by many to be the best quality salt available. It is available in coarse grain – which is the perfect finishing or pinching size, stone ground fine – ideally used at the table instead of processed salts, and extra fine (Velvet) grain – perfect for sprinkling over nuts or popcorn.

Hawaiian Sea Salt

Other Names: Alaea, Alae, Hawaiian Red Salt, Hiwa Kai, Black Hawaiian Salt

Alaea Sea Salt is a traditional Hawaiian table salt used to season and preserve. A natural mineral called “Alae” (volcanic baked red clay) is added to enrich the salt with iron oxide. This natural additive is what gives the salt its distinctive red (pink) color. The clay imparts a subtle flavor that is said to be mellower and more earthy than regular sea salt. It is the traditional and authentic seasoning for native Hawaiian dishes such as Kalua pig, poke and Hawaiian jerky. It is also delicious on prime rib and pork loin. Alaea Red Hawaiian Sea Salt is available in fine and coarse grain.

Black Hawaiian sea salt, or Hiwa Kai, has a stunning black color. Activated charcoal is added to the salt for its stunning visual presentation, and flavor enhancing properties. Charcoal has also become popular for use in detox diets. Though not in large enough quantities to take as a detox supplement here, the activated charcoal in Hiwa Kai Black Hawaiian Sea Salt adds a pop of color and tasty flavor to your dishes. Available in coarse grain—great for tableside presentation and grinders.

Italian Sea Salt

Other Names: Sicilian Sea Salt, Sale Marino

Italian sea salt is produced from the low waters of the Mediterranean Sea along the coast of Sicily. It is a natural salt rich in minerals, such as iodine, fluorine, magnesium and potassium, with a slightly lower percentage of sodium chloride than regular table salt. The salt pans are filled with the seawater in the spring and left to evaporate, relying on the heat of the Sicilian sun and strong African winds. Harvesting takes place once the water has evaporated and the salt is crushed and ground without any further refining. These salts have a delicate taste and plenty of flavor, without being too strong or salty. Italian sea salts are wonderful on salads or used to finish roasts and sauces. Great as a garnish on bruschetta. Available in coarse and fine grain.

Sea Salt

Other Names: Sal Del Mar, Sel De Mer, Sale Marino

Sea salt is a broad term that generally refers to unrefined salt derived directly from a living ocean or sea. It is harvested through channeling ocean water into large clay trays and allowing the sun and wind to evaporate it naturally. Manufacturers of sea salt typically do not refine sea salt as much as other kinds of processed salt, so it still contains natural traces of other minerals, including iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, manganese, zinc and iodine. Proponents of sea salt rave about its bright, pure, clean flavor, and about the subtleties lent to it by these other trace minerals. Some of the most common sources for sea salt include the Mediterranean Sea, the North Sea, and the Atlantic Ocean (particularly in France, on the coast of Brittany). Sea salt is thought to be healthier and more flavorful than traditional table salt. Available in coarse, fine & extra fine grain size, and many sizes in between!

Hawaiian Sea salt and Smoked Sea Salt - Photo by: http://www.saltworks.us

Smoked Sea Salt

Smoked sea salts are a relatively new and exciting gourmet salt in the U.S.! When you are considering a smoked sea salt, make sure that it is a naturally smoked salt, and hasn’t just had liquid smoke flavoring added—this can create a bitter taste. The salts that are smoked naturally in cold smokers are slow-smoked over real wood fires to infuse the salt crystals with 100% natural smoke flavor. Smoked sea salts add a unique flavor to a wide range of dishes including roasts, chicken, salads and sandwiches.

Unlike artificially infused smoke flavored salts, quality smoked sea salts are created using natural smoking methods. These salts are delicious to use when grilling or oven roasting, and are a must when cooking salmon. Also adds an authentic smokehouse flavor to soups, salads, pasta and sandwiches. Available in fine, coarse and flake grain sizes.

We will discuss more types of salt in the third installment of this series. Please remember, whether you find the type you wish online or in a specialty store, ALWAYS check to make sure it has a reputable hechsher you feel comfortable relying upon. Be warned, these salts are rather expensive.

CS

17
Jan
11

For Your Superbowl Party…


If you are hosting a Superbowl Party, you can either have the wife or yourself slave away preparing a meal, or you can save the aggravation and get a great price on delicious Indian fare:

If you are already watching the games and are hosting a party, why not do so with minimum patchke, with delicious Indian cuisine and with maximum enjoyment?

17
Jan
11

Matzel Toff – Dark Chocolate with Sea Salt


Just when I thought nothing could top the taste of Matzel Toff‘s Milk Chocolate covered matzah, I found out how grievously wrong I was. Matzel Toff‘s Dark Chocolate With Salt covered matzah is even better yet! Sea salt and chocolate?!?!? Sounds strange, right?  Try it, you’ll love it.

I just came across this delicacy and couldn’t wait to taste it.

Matzel Toff's Dark Chocolate with Sea Salt

I wasn’t disappointed, an amalgam of contrasting and complimenting flavors, this was a great exotic treat. Covered with toffee (which immediately sets this bar miles ahead of other plain chocolate covered matzah), followed by a thick layer of dark chocolate sprinkled with sea salt, it combines the complex mineral taste of sea salt with dark chocolate (less sweet than its full milk sibling) and a rich toffee that gives it that extra crunch.

This is truly a gourmet treat. Like the last bars we tried, this one also barely lasted a few minutes. Neither SYR nor I could resist it! Phillip Guttman and Abigail Levy, Matzel Toff‘s owners/partners, have done it again!

We’ve received quite a few inquiries as to where it’s available, having contacted the company I was assured that their products will be available at a number of places in the five boroughs and in various states in March, with various products being introduced specifically for Pesach. Meanwhile, starting in March also, you may order from their current stock or pre-order the Passover products at their website.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

RELATED POSTS

Matzel Toff

16
Jan
11

Mushroom Stuffed Chicken Breasts


On a recent visit to Irene Saiger’s Bamitbach blog, I came across an easy to make but delicious sounding recipe. While she did not list exact quantities, here’s the version I made:

Mushroom Stuffed Chicken Breasts

(adapted)

Directions
  • 4 boneless chicken breasts cut in half and weighing about 6 ounces each.
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 cup bread crumbs
  • 1/ tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 12 shitake mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 1/2 tbs parsley
  • 3-4 tbs olive Oil
Directions
  1. Slice shiitake mushrooms and sauté in olive oil along with minced garlic and chopped parsley.
  2. Add salt and pepper to taste and cook till mushrooms are tender.
  3. Remove from heat.  Fill each flattened chicken breast with some of the mixture and roll up.
  4. Dip in beaten egg and then seasoned bread crumbs.
  5. Return to hot frying pan to which you have added some extra olive oil. Fry till golden on both sides.
  6. Place frying pan in a 350 degree oven for about 20 minutes till chicken is cooked through.
  7. Slice on the diagonal and serve..

I made it last evening, motzey Shabbos, since I had some friends over; we all thought it was very good. Thank you Irene for this delectable recipe!!!

For side dishes I made some mashed potato with margarine, minced garlic, basil (for a great aroma), and a dash of tarragon; the second side dish was a simple honey-dijon salad. We paired it with a Benyamina 2007 Chardonnay, a very nice combination. Thank you Irene, for this delectable recipe!!!

You’ll find more photos on Irene’s blog, giving quite a detailed visual description.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

14
Jan
11

Jachnun


Ever since I first tasted it at a Shabbat kidush in shull, I can barely eat cholent without it anymore. Looking to make my own  jachnun, rather than buy it, I found the following on Astray Recipes:

Making jachnun - Photo from: travelpod.com

Jachnun

Ingredients

  • 3¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1½ teaspoon Salt
  • 1 large egg
  • 1¼ cup water
  • ¾ cup margarine; cut into 6 pieces

Directions

  1. Combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in food processor and process to blend. Add egg and 1 cup water and process with on/off turns to mix. With motor running, gradually add remaining water, about 1/4 cup, adding enough so mixture comes together to a smooth, fairly stiff dough. It will be sticky. Remove from processor.
  2. Knead dough well by slapping vigorously on the work surface. Divide into 6 pieces and knead each one with a slapping motion until smooth. Roll each in your palm to a ball.
  3. Put on an oiled plate or tray, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.
  4. Oil working surface and rolling pin. Let margarine stand at room temperature until very soft.
  5. Roll out 1 ball of dough on oiled surface to a very thin 12-inch square. To help stretch dough, pull it gently from time to time by hand, until very thin. If dough tears, simply press it together. Spread with a piece of soft margarine. Fold in half, then in half again to make a long strip. Roll up strip from a short side in a tight cylinder. Repeat with 5 remaining pieces of dough.
  6. Put in greased, shallow 8-inch square baking dish. Cover with foil and a lid and refrigerate at least 2 or up to 8 hours. Preheat oven to 200 F. Bake pastries 13-14 hours or until golden brown. Serve hot.

Source: “International Jewish Cookbook“, by Faye Levy, Warner Books 1991. Found on the Internet.

Personally, I’ll skip the sixth step. I’ll take one serving put it in the cholent and freeze the others to be used on subsequent weeks. I also add some hardboiled eggs (Yemenite custom) which by lunch time, on Shabbos, taste superb having cooked for so many hours on low heat.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

12
Jan
11

Darkness, Jewelry, and the Brit Beyn HaBetarim


[Rafi Farber, a friend and faithful blog reader, is a director at zoara.com. In this, his third post on these pages, he continues to expound on the connection between the TaNa"CH and jewelry. CS]

There are always previously un-thought of connections to be made and the map of the Torah never ceases to reveal new patterns as one generation builds upon the preceding one. So here is the connection between the plague of darkness, Egyptian jewelry, and Hashem‘s covenant with Abraham 430 years before the Exodus took place.

The plague of darkness was rather setting the ground for the death of the firstborn and the imminent Exodus from Egypt than it was a plague in and of itself. It was one day before the darkness – the tenth of Nissan – when Moses relayed the Divine command to tie a sheep to the bedpost, in preparation for its sacrifice and the death of the Egyptian first born. The Israelites were commanded to tie up the sheep before the darkness set in, so that the Egyptians could clearly see what they were doing.

Further, our sages say that during the plague of darkness, four fifths of the Jewish people actually died – those that did not intend on leaving. They couldn’t be allowed to simply stay behind and cause a desecration of the Almighty’s name, nor could they be allowed to die in sight of the Egyptians and lead to the same. Hakadosh Baruch Hu had other plans in bringing the darkness upon Egypt – to prepare the ground and to take care of some back-issues, so to speak, with Israel.

Ancient Egyptian jewelry - rings, earrings, bracelets pendants and more

But there was one other thing the darkness was made to do, as emphasized by Rabbi S.R. Hirsch in the 19th century. During the plague of darkness, no Egyptian moved an inch. The darkness was so thick it was tangible. If a front door was open, it stayed open. If a gate was unlocked, it stayed unlocked. Everything – every Egyptian possession, treasure, valuable, was available for the taking. And yet, when the darkness cleared and the light of night began to “shine,” relatively speaking (the darkness ended at night), nothing had moved. All valuables were still there, nothing was stolen, and everything was where it should have been. The Israelites didn’t steal a single Egyptian penny.

This, more than anything else, showed the moral superiority of the Israelites. The Egyptians suddenly realized who they had been enslaving, who they had been brutally murdering for the past 210 years. A decent, moral people who wouldn’t steal even from their enemies.

At that point, God makes a request of Moses. He actually says please. “Please,” says God, “Tell the Israelites to ask their neighbors for their possessions, their riches, their jewelry, their clothing, please take it all.

No wonder the Egyptians immediately shoved everything they owned at the Jews. They didn’t take anything during the darkness, but now they were asking nicely? Take it! Take it all!

But why did God say “please?”

RaSH”I explains that Hashem said “please” because He didn’t want Abraham coming to Him accusing Him of reneging on the promise of the Brit Beyn HaBetarim – that the Jews would leave Egypt with great wealth. Therefore, He asked us to cover His back and finish the redemption process.

It’s the same with any redemption. We always have to take the last step. Otherwise nothing works. Without us completing the process, nothing even makes any sense. Ultimately, we’ll finish it, just like we did with the Paschal Lamb and the blood on the doorpost so God would pass over our houses; just like we did at the Red Sea when Nachshon ben Aminadav jumped in; just like we did with the Egyptians’ jewelry and just like we will do, eventually, in the State of Israel.

Rafi Farber

RELATED POSTS

Taba’at and Tov, The Meaning of a Good Ring

Food, Jewelry and the Torah

11
Jan
11

Salt… – Part 1


As we are on the verge of a blizzard again (starting sometime this afternoon) and since salt will be used to melt the snow, it reminded me that we should look at its various types and their role in cooking. Salt is the oldest known spice, its flavor is versatile, it is a staple of cooks and bakers.

What’s Cooking America describes its uses:

Enhancing almost every dish, salt is added to breads, meats, fruits and vegetables to sauces and desserts.

Additionally, salt aids foods in a variety of ways like:

Preservation – helps protect against microorganisms, bacteria through dehydration and preventing growth of bacteria, which slows or prevents spoilage.

Texture Aid – in bread making, allows the dough to rise by giving helping the gluten hold more water and carbon dioxide. In meats it improves tenderness and in cheeses it aids in consistency of the cheese and the hardness of the rind.

Binder – in processed meats it helps retain water which reduces the loss of meat when cooking.

Color Developer – in processed meats it helps obtain the desired color. It also helps create a golden crust for breads.

Fermentation Control – slows and controls the fermentation process in:

  • Pickling
  • Cheese production
  • Sauerkraut production
  • Summer sausage production

The Food Network, talks about the three main types:

Photo from: virtualweberbullet.com

What is the difference between kosher salt, sea salt, and table salt?

For the cook’s purposes, the main difference between salts is in their texture. Table salt’s fine granules dissolve quickly, making it the preferred salt of bakers. Sea salt and kosher salt possess larger, irregular grains that add a delightful crunch and hit of briny flavor when sprinkled on food at the last minute. Generally, savvy cooks prefer kosher salt when cooking, since its coarse texture is easier to take a pinch of when seasoning savory dishes.

Chemically there is little difference between kitchen salts. All are at least 97 1/2 percent sodium chloride. But there are significant differences in the provenance and processing of these salts.

Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits, and includes a small portion of calcium silicate, an anti-caking agent added to prevent clumping. It possesses very fine crystals and a sharp taste. Because of its fine grain a single teaspoon of table salt contains more salt than a tablespoon of kosher or sea salt.

Sea salt is harvested from evaporated seawater and receives little or no processing, leaving intact the minerals from the water it came from. These minerals flavor and color the salt slightly. However, because these salts are usually expensive, it is worth keeping in mind that they lose their unique flavor when cooked or dissolved.

Kosher salt takes its name from its use in the koshering process. It contains no preservatives and can be derived from either seawater or underground sources. Aside from being a great salt to keep within arm’s reach when you are cooking, it is particularly useful in preserving, because its large crystals draw moisture out of meats and other foods more effectively than other salts.

Since lately we’ve talking about cheese, I thought I should post here one of my favorite adapted Foodista pasta recipes, Potato Gnocchi with Walnut Sauce:

Potato Gnocchi with Walnut Sauce (Photo from: foodista.com)

Gnocchi Di Patate Con Salsa Di Noci (adapted)

Ingredients

  • 7 ozs walnuts
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 handful parsley leaves
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch cracked black pepper
  • 1 dinner roll or slice of bread, crust removed
  • 1 cup milk
  • olive oil
  • grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon unflavored yogurt
  • cream or half and half

Directions

  1. Put 7 ozs of walnuts, a clove of garlic a handful of parsley, a pinch of salt and freshly ground pepper in a food processor. Process until you have a rough paste. Then add a dinner roll or thick slice of bread, with the crust removed, soaked in milk and squeezed dry, olive oil, grated parmesan cheese and tablespoon of unflavored yogurt. Start processing and, as the you process, add either milk, cream or ‘half-and-half’ through the funnel until the mixture forms a fairly smooth sauce.
  2. Take your gnocchi and boil them in well salted water until they come to the surface of the water. Transfer them from the water with a slotted spoon into a large bowl, add a generous dollop of the walnut sauce, some more grated cheese and, if you like–although some sources call it heresy–a nut of butter. Mix gently with a spatula, adding a bit of the pasta water to thin out the sauce if need be. Serve immediately with additional grated cheese for those who want it.

I’ve made this a few times and I can assure you it is absolutely delicious!

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

10
Jan
11

And Our Upcoming Wednesday’s Internet Radio Show Guest Will Be…


Gil Marks

We had a great show this past Wednesday with Gil Marks whose knowledge of all things food is truly encyclopedic. If you missed the show you can hear it here. It was fascinating to delve into the traditions of food, what’s behind a name, it was/it is well worth a listen.

This upcoming Wednesday’s show will feature another fascinating guest, Nina Shapir, a Brooklyn restaurateur with a difference. Who is Nina Shapir? I’ve spoken to her when The Kosher scene reviewed her Natural Village Cafe and this were my impressions:

Nina Shapir, who presides over this eatery is truly a fascinating personality, the personal journey that changed her life and motivated her to open this establishment is full of commitment and dedication.

Fourteen years ago, Mrs. Shapir – a very young mother of three – found herself sick and unable to move, unable to cope. It was not a question of being financially overwhelmed, any such concerns were well taken care of. Medical tests and treatments produced no positive results, on the contrary things inexplicably kept getting worse. She met Harav Chay Azoulay, from Herzliya, who told her the real malady was not physical but rather one that affected her neshama. After some thought, trying to make sense of Rav Azulay’s words, she went on a detox diet with the help of healthfood stores, intent on ridding herself of all negative energies. This decision was followed by six very hard weeks before she saw any measurable improvements but soon after she was her old active, curious, intelligent, enterprising self again.

At this stage, Nina decided to help others who, though similarly afflicted, may not be aware of the real source of their health troubles. She went on to study Healing Arts at The School of Natural Healing in Utah from which she graduated. Seven years ago her first organic restaurant opened its doors. Her partner, however, was not frum and it proved frustrating, eventually Nina bought her out. In 2008 she moved to the present location which combines her personal philosophy, her exquisite sense of aesthetics and the true love of a foodie for superb fare. She also has an an office adjacent to the restaurant where she treats the many in search of natural healing.

Please listen in on our show on Wednesday at 8:00pm on Jewish Radio Network. Click on the red “here” under the white “Radio,” then wait about 90 to 180 seconds for the application to start streaming.

CS

09
Jan
11

The World of Kosher Cheese – part 2b


Aside from Pomegranate‘s great selection of specialty cheeses, they have the biggest display of prepackaged cheeses I’ve seen anywhere.

Lots of choices!

From such small producers as Karen’s Bracha’s Cheese Co’s, Twisted Mozzarella with Zahatar; or Susan Gourmet’s selections of foreign styled cheeses to major producers such as Anderson International Foods cholov Yisroel Natural and Kosher line, their non-cholov Yisroel Les Petites Fermières to Fresh and Healthy, to Tnuva, you’ll find them all here.

Closeup of various cheese shelves

Sugar River Cheese Co.’s choices are among SYR’s favorite American made cheeses, Les Petites Fermières’ imported Camembert and Brie are her favorite imports. I’ve tried some of Fresh and Healthy‘s Capriccio collection and liked them all. The Cheese Guy also has some delicious cheeses but the company’s hechsherim vary by the cheese, be sure to check to make sure the individual hechsher is acceptable to you. Cholov is another company that produces an all time favorite like the Chevrai line of goat milk cheeses.

As a foodie, and expanding on Elizabeth Bland’s own blog, I could spend a whole day going and admiring the cheese choices with the same fervor, with the same passion, with the same delight with which I could through a museum filled with masterpieces! But… if you are a regular reader of this blog you already know that, of course.

Whether you are new to the world of cheese, whether you are connoisseur, whether you like raw milk, cow’s milk, or goat’s milk cheese, Pomegranate‘s got them all.

CS

07
Jan
11

The World of Kosher Cheese – part 2a


Back in ’70s when I lived in Tel Aviv, we would often travel to Europe – mostly to Paris – on any excuse we could master. Why Paris? On one one of our early jaunts we had discovered a small kosher fromagerie – cheese-maker shop (whose name I’ve long forgotten) in Les Marais, the city’s Jewish quarter. There, not only could we admire the creativity and beauty of their artisanal products, we could taste them and hear each cheese’s story and what gave it it’s particular character. Some were made with wine, some combined fruits or vegetables, some appeared as if plucked out of some colorful still life canvass. All delighted us with their looks and tastes…

Yesterday, on the second leg of my expedition in search of kosher cheeses, cheeses far superior to the old almost tasteless American kosher types of yore, Elizabeth Bland (cheese maven extraordinaire!) and I stopped over at Pomegranate (1507 Coney Island Avenue – corner of Avenue L – Brooklyn, New York 11230; Tel: 718.951.7112) and the memories of that little shop in Paris suddenly came back to me…

Pomegranate, at 1507 Coney Island Avenue in Brooklyn

As we looked on at Pomegranate‘s own cheese creations – they have a state of the art cheese making facility on their second floor – as we looked at their selections of foreign cheeses, whether prepackaged on foreign soils or packaged on premises we felt like little kids in a quaint little toy shop filled with the most  unusual gadgets and toys. Ms. Bland proceeded to explain about various European cheeses, how to eat them, what their origins were. She especially delighted in talking about the Raclette from Ermitage. Gabe Boxer, the store manager (who explained the store’s philosophy of bringing and creating the best to suit the emerging gourmet kosher palate), told us that shortly they would be carrying the pans where one warms up the Raclette before consuming it. As I looked through the shelves I suddenly spotted the last piece of their Argentinian Reggianito Parmesan, which reminded me of my youth in Uruguay and a favorite cheese of those days… I also found what looked like a delightful Manchego

Small detail of a shelf in the specialty cheese section

They had quite a few unusual cheeses of their own creation or created specifically for them…

Munstarella with Olives, Cranberry with Port Wine, Burcin Pepper, Halloumi, Brie Filled with Fruits, Goat Cheese Rolled in Toasted Nuts and many more!!!

Elizabeth Bland and Pomegranate's Gabe Boxer

So many superb selections I can’t possibly cover them all on this short post, gentle reader, you’ll just have to go in and see for yourself. I’ll have to do another post on their wide selection of pre-packaged cheeses from various American manufacturers, including artisanal cheeses.

CS

Elizabeth Bland’s post on her blog

RELATED POSTS

The World of Kosher Cheese – Part 1




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 7,608 other followers

Calendar of Posts

January 2011
S M T W T F S
« Dec   Feb »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Archives

Visit our friends at the Kosher Wine Society

Noach: Stranded and Branded

Buy the book…

Category Cloud

18 Restaurant baking baking recipe baking recipes BlogTalkRadio cheese Chef David Kolotkin Chef Jeff Nathan Chef Lévana Chef Lévana Kirschenbaum chicken chicken recipes cookbook authors cookbooks dairy cuisine dairy recipes Esti Berkowitz fine dining fine kosher dining fine kosher dining in Manhattan fine kosher restaurants fine restaurants fish fish recipes Geila Hocherman Gotham Wines & Liquors Internet Radio Irving Schild Jack's Gourmet Jewish history kosher kosher baking kosher baking recipe kosher baking recipes kosher beef kosher beef recipes kosher cheese kosher chefs kosher chicken dishes kosher chicken recipes kosher cookbook authors kosher cookbooks kosher cookery Kosher cooking kosher cooking classes kosher cooking demos kosher cuisine kosher dairy kosher dairy cuisine kosher dairy recipes kosher desserts kosher dining kosher dining in Brooklyn kosher dining in Manhattan kosher dining in NY kosher fine dining kosher fine wines kosher fish kosher fish recipes Kosher food kosher Israeli wine kosher Italian cuisine kosher meat dishes kosher meat recipes kosher meat restaurants kosher meat restaurants in Manhattan kosher Mediterranean cuisine kosher parve recipes kosher poultry dishes kosher poultry recipes kosher recipes kosher restaurant review Kosher restaurants kosher restaurants in Brooklyn kosher restaurants in Manhattan kosher restaurants in New York City kosher restaurants in NY Kosher Revolution Kosher Scene kosher soup recipes kosher wine kosher wines Lévana Lévana Kirschenbaum meat recipes parve recipes Passover Pomegranate Supermarket poultry poultry recipes Prime Grill Royal Wine Corporation Shavuos Shavuos recipes Susie Fishbein The Kosher Scene The Kosher Scene Radio Show Uncategorized Wine

BlogTopSites


<a href="//www.blogtopsites.com/food-drink/" title="Food & Drink Blogs" target="_blank"><img style="border:none" src="//www.blogtopsites.com/v_158881.gif" alt="Food & Drink Blogs" />
<a target="_blank" href="//www.blogtopsites.com" style="font-size:10px;">blog sites


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,608 other followers

%d bloggers like this: