Archive Page 2

12
May
14

Kale, Kale, Kale


In a comment to our post of January 21 of this year, our good friend Lévana Kirschenbaum suggested that we discuss the different types of kale available on the American market. While it’s more easily found in autumn and winter, you can still find it even now.

The most commonly found is the Curly Kale sometimes known as Scottish Kale

Kale, Curly Kale, or Scottish Kale

Kale, Curly Kale, or Scottish Kale

For a delightful vegetarian recipe made with this version of kale and a meat variation of it check out our Caldo Verde.

Another fairly common variety is Russian or Red Kale…

Russian or Red Kale

Russian or Red Kale

Red or Russian Kale has a softer texture, is slightly sweeter than Curly Kale and has a somewhat buttery taste. When used together with the more common variety it produces a nice color combination while adding a subtle sweetness to the dish.

For tomorrow’s breakfast I will use Red Kale to make this delicious sounding recipe which I just found (on Kalyn’s Kitchen

Photo from: Kalyn's Kitchen

Photo from: Kalyn’s Kitchen

The most delicious kind of kale, however is Tuscan Kale or Cavalo Nero

Tuscan Kale or Cavalo Nero

Tuscan Kale or Cavalo Nero

Used mostly in Tuscan dishes, it’s hard to go back to any other kind of kale after savoring this tender and nicely flavored variety.

Kale is descended from the wild cabbages of southern Europe. It thrives in cold weather but grows successfully all over the world. The addition of some baby kale juice will spruce up any raw carrot juice drink. Kale is an excellent source of beta carotene and vitamin C; it is a good source of folate, calcium iron and potassium; it contains bioflavonoids and other substances that protect against cancer. It’s only known drawback is that it may produce gas in some people.

When you make a salad, a soup, a fritata, don’t forget to use kale for a superbly delicious and healthy addition.

CS

28
Apr
14

Yom HaSho’a – Holocaust Remembrance Day


I am the son of Holocaust survivors. Prior to WWII, my parents were a successful young middle class couple with a seemingly bright future ahead in Lodz (Poland). My father was a department manager at the Ettingon Brothers textile dye manufacturing plant in town and my mother was a nurse at the Jewish hospital. In 1939, as the Nazi troops marched into town, their world was plunged into darkness and horror. The Germans tore my then 3 year old brother Yitzchok ben Yaakov (alav haShalom), from my mother’s arms and I never got to know him.

By courtesy of the same murderers – and their collaborators – I never was held by any of my grandparents, nor any of my uncles, nor any of my aunts, for neither was I to see them alive. The blood of innocent Jews has not fully dried up on European soil, yet – for the last seven decades since the war ended – there are those those who vehemently deny the stark historical truth, while survivors are still around, while Germany’s own archives record the persecution, enslavement and murders…

Yesterday, the 27th of April, was the sad anniversary of the massacre of those whose only crime was to have been born Jewish in a Europe that thirsted for a hated scapegoat, in a Europe where – in spite of a number of courageous gentiles who endangered themselves and their families to hide and save Jews – prejudice, ignorance and greed melded into one simple cause: Annihilate the Jew!

At around noontime, this past Sunday, the annual Holocaust Observance Day was held in front of the Iranian Mission to the UN on 3rd Avenue in Manhattan’s East Side.

Jeffrey S. Weisenfeld, opened the proceedings, as he introduced the various speakers…

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Malcolm Hoenlein

Jeffrey S. Weisenfeld

Speakers included, members of a Russian Jewish organization of survivors, elected politicians, community leaders, rabbis and more. While almost everyone spoke eloquently and from the heart, two of them really stood out:

Rabbi Avi Weiss

Rabbi Avi Weiss

Rabbi Weiss (with whose religious hashkafot I hardly agree), spoke eloquently and forcefully about the existential danger to Israel (and Jews in general!) that Iran’s current regime represents. He reminded us that in 1994, Hezbollah (Iran’s Lebanese puppet) was directly responsible for blowing up the Buenos Aires Jewish Center (AMIA), killing 87 and wounding 100, two years after Islamic Jihad claimed credit for bombing the Israeli Embassy (in the same city) killing 29 and wounding 250.

For the record, in October 2006 Argentinian prosecutors Alberto Nisman and Marcelo Martínez Burgos formally accused top officials within the government of Iran with orchestrating the bombing and Hezbollah for carrying it out. Their indictment stated that the decision to approve the bombing was ultimately made by Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, but other senior government members were also part of the discussion, including then-President Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati, Intelligence Minister Ali Fallahijan and National Security Council Secretary Hassan Rouhani (Iran’s current charming, smooth-talking-terrorist President!).

Meanwhile, diagonally across the street, Iran’s supporters had their own counter rally… A small group comprised of individuals dressed like ultra-Orthodox learned Rabbis (some were even holding talmud tractates, which they – at times – would glance into), a group – who – in reality, is nothing more than the erev rav – a fifth column; a group made up of individuals who long ago forfeited their Jewish souls as they sold themselves to that putrid Iranian little maggot – Mahmoud Ahmedinajad – in exchange for funding for their organization (Neturei Karta). There are many videos, many photos online of these guys hugging, kissing, and cavorting with the Iranian murderer of his own people (did we forget already?!?). Yes, Ahmedinajad, the very one who – as a university student – was part of the mob that stormed the American Embassy in Teheran and held American diplomats captive while humiliating them daily for 444 days (i.e. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-r04SQ97_Q). Notice, in the video, who sits directly to the right of Ahmedinajad and see the photo below…

Rabbi Beck, leader of Neturei Karta USA, and part of his group with one of them proudly waving the Iranian flag...

Rabbi Beck, leader of Neturei Karta USA, and part of his group as one of them proudly waves the Iranian flag…

As I crossed the street to photograph their infamy, one of them screamed out at me: “The Zionists killed 6 million Germans and 6 million Jews.” I’ll let you, gentle reader, draw your own conclusions about such a statement and the one who uttered it…

Rabbi Weiss compared the Neturei Karta to the Jewish kappos (Jews who – in order to save their own lives, in the concentration camps – collaborated with the Nazis, sometimes ruthlessly), for their support of Iran, their support of Hamas and Yasser Arafat (while he was alive) and the prayers on behalf of the arch terrorist as he lay dying of AIDS in a sanatorium in France. He concluded his speech by leading the audience in stirring renditions of Shlomo Carlebach‘s (Z”L) Am Yisroel Chai and Od Avinu Chai.

He was followed by an even more electrifying speaker…

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach

Rabbi Boteach just came back from a week in Rwanda, where he was a guest of President Paul Kagame during the commemorations of the bloody massacre that took place there during the infamous Rwandan civil war. He too spoke of the existential danger to Israel, the Jews and the US, if the Ayatollahs are allowed to build a nuclear arsenal. He disagreed however with Rabbi Weiss‘ equating the kappos with Neturei Karta. However ruthless the kappos‘ behaviour may have been, they had no choice, Rabbi Boteach said, for they feared for their lives! The Neturei Karta who claim to be devout Jews, who claim strict adherence to the Torah and Hakodosh Boruch Hu‘s everlasting law, do have a choice yet they openly and proudly collaborate with our enemies for the sake of a handout…

CS

20
Mar
14

A Conversation with Rachelle Kassai


rachelle-portraitThis evening at 10:00 pm (Eastern Time) on BlogTakRadio.com, we will be talking with owner/founder of Finchi’s by Aunt Rashi, Rachelle Kassai. Finchi’s offers a scrumptious variety of gluten, nut, sugar and dairy-free desserts, using only the finest European ingredients. Tonight, Mrs. Kassai will tell us what made her leave a successful path in the corporate world and pursue what she loves best.

Having tasted Finchi’s products over the last couple of years, I can attest to their truly being delicious and worthy of being offered at the finest banquets as well as at any family table.

Meanwhile in case you missed it, why not listen to last eve’s two-part broadcast with Chef Sara Black and Weight Management Counselor Vicki Rothschild.

Don’t forget to tune us in this evening at 10:00 pm (Eastern Time) on BlogTakRadio.com, when we will be talking with owner/founder of Finchi’s by Aunt RashiRachelle Kassai, for what promises to be an interesting conversation. We will be waiting for you.

CS

18
Mar
14

A Conversation with Sara Black and Vicki Rothschild


Sara-Black1abcTomorrow evening (March 19th) at 9:30pm (Eastern Time) we will be talking to Chef extraordinaire Sara Black, on BlogTalkRadio.com. Ms. Black hails from Israel and has a business here as well in her native land. Later this week we will post 6 Passover recipes which I’ve had the privilege to film and taste at a private demo given by Chef Sara. I can assure you they were all incredibly delicious in spite of the fact they were very quick and easy to prepare.

Chef Sara runs a catering company – Asparagus Catering – and is also a Private Chef here in the US as well Israel. In the past she was Executive Chef at various Israeli hotels and restaurants, as well as restaurants in France and other parts of Europe. Ms. Black consults on restaurants and more, and is ready to share her expertise with our listeners tomorrow evening at 9:30pm (Eastern Time) on our BlogTalkRadio.com show. The broadcast was pre-taped on Sunday February 23rd at Chagall Bistro, in Brooklyn’s Park Slope area, at brunch time. The recording has some background noise but even so, it makes for an interesting and entertainting listen.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, please listen to our show with ancient Hebrew book and manuscript collector, dealer and personal buyer Hersh Eidlisz.

Don’t forget to tune us in tomorrow evening at 9:30pm (Eastern Time) we will be talking to Chef extraordinaire Sara Black, on BlogTalkRadio.com. We’ll be waiting for you!

 *** UPDATE ****

VickiThe Second part of tonight’s show, on BlogTalkRadio.com, will be a live interview with Vicki Rothschild, a Weight Management Counselor. Vicki managed to shed more than half her weight, eight years ago (after 20 years of struggle with Super Morbid Obesity) and tonight she will share her path to weight loss.

Her weight management program, includes:
* Unwavering support and guidance.
* Motivation, Inspiration and Insight.
* Accountability.
* An endless array of strategies and tips to get you through all situations and every obstacle you face.
* Learning new skills and behaviors to halt mindless & emotional eating.
* A satisfying, delicious plan that you will want to continue forever.
* Hundreds of scrumptious, satiating, recipes for Shabbos, Yom Tov or every day to wow you, your guests.

Don’t forget to tune us in this evening at 9:30pm (Eastern Time) we will be talking to Chef extraordinaire Sara Black, followed by successful Weight Management Counselor, Vicki Rothschild, on BlogTalkRadio.com.

CS

17
Mar
14

Purim in Providence, RI


I spent the weekend visiting family and friends in Providence, Rhode Island, in anticipation of Sunday’s Purim Parade. In spite of the cold, a fair number of families showed up for the yearly event.

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ProvPur1

The crowd gathering…

ProvPur6

Children and adults alike dressed up for the occasion in very distinctive costumes, such as the Alice in Wonderland‘s Mad Hatter accompanied by Hulk Hogan (as bodyguard?).

ProvPur2

Pluto and the Cookie Monster…

ProvPur3

Garfield the Cat…

ProvPur5

…a cute little kitten (one of my granddaughters)

ProvPur4ab

The parade got under way with a uniformed marching band, under the asuperb direction of musical phenomenon Fishl Bressler (atop a truck), leading. Among the participants were the town’s Rabbonim, Rosh Yeshivos and the Rosh Kollel.  A non-Jewish Scotsman, with kilt and all, proudly played the bagpipes.

Though it barely lasted an hour, due to the brutal cold, the parade brought out the comraderie and the mirth of Providence’s frum community. It was my first attending the parade and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

CS

10
Mar
14

Fifth Avenue Synagogue – A morning of Learning


Yesterday, the 7th of Adar – Sunday the 9th, I attended a Full Morning of Learning, at Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue Synagogue. What could be more appropriate on Moshe Rabbeinu‘s yohrtzeit than to honor him with communal learning?

There were fifteen lectures mostly (though not exclusively) dealing with Purim and Megillas Esther divided into three one hour sessions. There was plenty of choice for all levels, for all tastes.  For the first period I attended a lecture by Rabbi Eli Mansour from the Edmond J. Safra Synagogue in Brooklyn

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Fifth-ElMan

Rabbi Mansour’s topic The Secret of Megillat Esther concerned the mistake Haman made when he thought the month of Adar would be a perfect time to annihilate the Jewish people. Rav Mansour quoted sources from R. Yonatan Eybischutz‘s writings, the Zohar and the Talmud, which aptly described Haman’s misunderstanding of the lots he cast before deciding which month would be best for the success of his nefarious intent.

Next I listened to Rabbi Shaya Karlinsky, from Shapell’s Darche Noam Yeshiva in Eretz Yisrael.

Fifth-ShayKar

His spoke about Jewish Humor: Not a Laughing Matter. What makes a joke uniquely Jewish? Why is it, if you substitute another ethnic or religious group for the Jews the joke – at best – has diminished its impact or becomes totally unfunny? He also brought down various sources from the Talmud, Midrash and more. An example of a joke that only works fully if you understand the Jewish psyche and would barely cause a smile if the characters were not Jewish, goes as follows:

On the day of the Eastern Seaboard blackout in 2003, Max changes a light bulb. Sally, his wife is looking out the window and as soon he screws in the new bulb, she’s is appalled to see all the lights in the neighborhood go off; in dismay she cries out:

Max, what you done?!?!?

My last session was with Rabbi Yissocher Frand, Rosh Yeshiva at Baltimore’s Ner Yisroel Yeshiva.

Fifth-YisFran

He spoke on Favorite Lessons from Megillat Esther. Rav Frand stressed the importance of Megillat Esther in our time and in our values, the importance of an individual reaching out of his/her comfort zone to achieve one’s full potential.

All in all, it was a very interesting morning filled with inspiring and thought provoking lectures.

CS

05
Mar
14

Le Marais, Revisited


Earlier today, Meyer Haroch (from The New York Jewish Guide) and I were at a business lunch in Le Marais (150 46th Street, between 6th and 7th Avenue, in Manhattan; Tel:212.869.0900). When we first reviewed the restaurant on these pages we wrote:

Le Marais has been the yardstick by which all other kosher restaurants are measured.

That still is the case, the portions are generous and cooked to perfection; the flavors, the ambiance are uniquely Parisian. Meyer ordered the Lunch Special (Steak, Frites and Salade)…

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LesMarais1

The aroma wafted throughout the area, as it bespoke of intense flavors that would have made even the most exacting gastronomes of old, salivate in anticipation. Meyer said the steak was very juicy and indeed very flavorful… as expected.

I ordered their triple layer Hamburger

LesMarais2

Though I was warned it would take 20 minutes to prepare, when it came it was obvious the wait had been more than worthwhile. Full of flavor, filled with red beats, and just the right amount of juiciness. As delightful to the palate, as it was to the eyes, it also came with salade and frites that were just crisp enough without sacrificing taste. I washed it down with a beer from Spain, Estrella Galicia. It poured a golden yellow with a fizzy white head, moderate to high carbonation with a very faint malt aroma. Its bland taste neither overpowered, nor detracted from the scrumptious hamburger which I had trouble finishing. Rather, this beer subtly complemented and enhanced the rich flavors of the meat.

Yes, it was a delightful lunch but one expects that from Le Marais!

CS

25
Feb
14

Chagall Bistro


This past Sunday, a Belgian couple we just met at the Museum of the Jewish Heritage concert, SYR and I, went to Chagall Bistro in Brooklyn’s Park Slope section (330 5th Avenue – on the corner of 5th Street – Brooklyn, NY 11215; Tel: 718.832.9777) for dinner. Walking into Chagall immediately took us to another time, another world, from Brooklyn’s Park Slope straight to old Paris. The ambiance was truly très authentique - a nice surprise – and the first of many more the evening had in store for us.

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Chag1

We started our repast with the Duck Pastilla

Chag2

It came with crispy duck cigars with saffron, almond and date coulis. Full of flavor and seasoned just right!

We segued with Chef’s Terrines and Pâté, a rich assortment of duck rillette, chicken liver mousse, veal country pâté, cornichon jelly and basket of greens. The rich taste of these delights brought back memories of my travels through France, memories long forgotten.

But we were not done with the surprises… we followed with two orders of Chagall Duck, for the ladies, and two Specials for the men…

Chag3

The Special consisted roasted rack of lamb, grilled basil focccaccia, parsnip mousseline, artickokes, tomato confit, thyme, sauteed natural jus. The lamb was tender, juicy and full of flavor, the foccaccia still warm from the oven – full of aroma and taste – the jus was better than any I ever tasted. The ladies couldn’t stop talking about the Chagall Duck, it became obvious we would have to taste it… Frankly, duck had never been a favorite of mine, but I’ll confess the Chagall Duck just became one.

We washed it down with a delicious 2013 Rashbi Malbec, from Argentina’s Mendoza region. Artgentina, it seems, is almost incapable of producing a bad Malbec, even in the case of an inexpensive one like this bottle. With plum and black currant on the palate, a hint of smokiness it left with a long finish, this young wine proved a perfect pairing for an exceptional dinner.

Chag4

We crowned the meal with a Chocolate Mousse for my friend, two Capuccinos for the ladies, and a Crème Brûlée for me. My Belgian friend pronounced his mousse the best he ever had, my Crème Brûlée (I’m addicted to them!) certainly was the best I’ve ever had.

As the Belgian said when we were leaving, “After eating in great kosher restaurants all over France, who would have thought I’d get my best French meal in Brooklyn?” A great evening to be sure, nonetheless there was something that marred it for me… looking around the nearby tables and seeing other diners’ choices, made me wish I could have eaten more. Chef Jean Claude Teulade and his stuff have developed the art of French kosher cuisine to heretofore unparalleled levels, which leaves us with little choice but to go back again and again and again.

CS

24
Feb
14

The Big Picture – David Krakauer at the Museum of The Jewish Heritage


Any great musician can play a piece of music and transport the listener to higher realms, but very few can make their instrument talk, cry, laugh, scream, whisper, all the while dancing up to the highest peaks of feelings, totally enwrapping the audience. David Krakauer is one of these incredibly few. The Museum of The Jewish Heritage presented, this past Sunday afternoon, a concert featuring clarinetist David Krakauer, violinist Sara Caswell, Sheryl Bailey and her electric guitar, Rob Schwimmer on keyboards, Mark Helias on contrabasss, and John Hadfield on drums and percussion, with special guest Alicia Krakauer – David’s daughter – giving a nice rendition of Funny Girl‘s People.

The program, The Big Picture, consisted of new arrangements of themes from movies portraying Jewish slices of life, such as: Fiddler on the RoofSophie’s ChoiceLife is BeautifulCabaretThe Producers, Funny GirlChariots of FireLenny and more. The visuals by Light of Day, enhanced the experience as they danced and reacted to the music.

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Krakau1wb

David Krakauer has played every genre of music, in all the greatest stages here in the US and in Europe, leading his listeners to expect a lot; this performance was just one more testament to his mastery of and passion for the clarinet.

Krakau7wb

As a now amateur violinist (who 55 years ago – as a young boy – soloed with the orchestra of the OSSODRE in Montevideo, Uruguay), I was listening raptly to Sara Caswell, while her bow alternated from gentle to furious up and downs, as I was moved by her unquestioned virtuosity. I especially enjoyed the dialogues between her violin and David’s clarinet.

Krakau2wb

Sheryl Bailey‘s electric guitar moved seamlessly from elegant subtlety to furious attack, all coming together for a beautifully coherent weave of glorious sound, as in her rendition of Honeycomb, from Lenny.

Every member of the band managed to shine on his or her own, but… after the fourteen pieces on the program were done, David Krakauer played an incredible solo that showed his full understanding of the subtlest nuances of the clarinet’s sound; then, the whole band joined in for a superb piece that explored every facet of their artistry. Somehow, now at the end the cohesiveness of the group, their collective artistic soul shone through in all its beauty, in all its depth.

Kabbalists and Chassidic Masters wrote that the human soul does not speak with words, for words are limited and unable to express the full range of feelings in the totality of their power, instead the soul speaks with music – a niggun. The niggun may be sad or happy leaving the individual happy or sad, yet at the end one always feels differently about him/herself and the world around, one always feels cleansed. Being in the audience for this concert left my soul absolutely uplifted and cleansed.

CS

26
Jan
14

Two Paintings


Over the last month and a half I’ve become the proud owner of two Igal Fedida abstract paintings. But as I’ve said before, on these pages, about the artist:

He is a modern painter with a message that extends beyond time. His colors are bold, Hebrew letters appear almost invariably, his brush strokes reveal a lot more about the subject matter than do the works of far more photo realistic artists. In short, though he paints Jewish art, his paintings speak to Jew and non-Jew alike, his works stir up emotions far beyond what the eyes can perceive. While looking at his works, you see the colors dance, you see the colors explode; no definable shape is discernible, yet everything that exists or ever existed is in them.”

The first one I acquired, is 12″x 12″ painted on paper…

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IgaFedpaint2

…”Between heavens and earth” represents – to me – the light breaking through the chaos as Creation starts to take shape and life though not fully defined, is just emerging. On the lower right corner the Hebrew letter “Bet,” the first letter of the book of Genesis is fully and beautifully shaped, it shows that though the elements were not yet recognizable, even through the Chaos everything was there and followed a very definite Divine plan.

The second work, which I got a few weeks later is a 40″ x 40″ mixed media on canvas…

IgaFedpaint

…”Explosion of Bereshit” happens shortly after the first depiction of Creation above. The Hebrew calligraphy quotes the first four verses of Genesis:

(1:1) In the beginning of God‘s creating the heavens and the earth — (1:2) when the earth was astonishingly empty, with darkness upon the surface of the deep, and the Divine Presence hovered upon the surface of the waters — (1:3) God said, “Let there be light, and there was light. (1:4) God saw that the light was good and God separated between the light and the darkness.
(The Stone Edition Artscroll Tanach translation)

That early supernal light, as it acquires strength, become a beautiful combination of colors, a pleasing canvas on which the Almighty’s creations will find a home. But… what about the viewer who heretofore denied the involvement, denied the very existence of a Divine Entity? To him/her the painting pointedly poses the question: can such an event as Creation be the result of random cataclysmic happenings that just resulted in life as we know it? 

Fedida‘s paintings may not solve philosophical dilemmas of faith, but they certainly present a clarification and a realistic interpretation – based on his kabalistic studies – of how Creation might have happened… Because, gentle reader, while looking at his works, you see the colors dance, you see the colors explode. While no definable shape is easily discernible, if you look carefully at the small details – the sudden turn of the painter’s brush, the shapes hinted – you soon realize that everything that exists or ever existed is represented here.

CS




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