Archive for the 'Les Marais' Category

07
Jan
11

The World of Kosher Cheese – part 2a


Back in ’70s when I lived in Tel Aviv, we would often travel to Europe – mostly to Paris – on any excuse we could master. Why Paris? On one one of our early jaunts we had discovered a small kosher fromagerie – cheese-maker shop (whose name I’ve long forgotten) in Les Marais, the city’s Jewish quarter. There, not only could we admire the creativity and beauty of their artisanal products, we could taste them and hear each cheese’s story and what gave it it’s particular character. Some were made with wine, some combined fruits or vegetables, some appeared as if plucked out of some colorful still life canvass. All delighted us with their looks and tastes…

Yesterday, on the second leg of my expedition in search of kosher cheeses, cheeses far superior to the old almost tasteless American kosher types of yore, Elizabeth Bland (cheese maven extraordinaire!) and I stopped over at Pomegranate (1507 Coney Island Avenue – corner of Avenue L – Brooklyn, New York 11230; Tel: 718.951.7112) and the memories of that little shop in Paris suddenly came back to me…

Pomegranate, at 1507 Coney Island Avenue in Brooklyn

As we looked on at Pomegranate‘s own cheese creations – they have a state of the art cheese making facility on their second floor – as we looked at their selections of foreign cheeses, whether prepackaged on foreign soils or packaged on premises we felt like little kids in a quaint little toy shop filled with the most  unusual gadgets and toys. Ms. Bland proceeded to explain about various European cheeses, how to eat them, what their origins were. She especially delighted in talking about the Raclette from Ermitage. Gabe Boxer, the store manager (who explained the store’s philosophy of bringing and creating the best to suit the emerging gourmet kosher palate), told us that shortly they would be carrying the pans where one warms up the Raclette before consuming it. As I looked through the shelves I suddenly spotted the last piece of their Argentinian Reggianito Parmesan, which reminded me of my youth in Uruguay and a favorite cheese of those days… I also found what looked like a delightful Manchego

Small detail of a shelf in the specialty cheese section

They had quite a few unusual cheeses of their own creation or created specifically for them…

Munstarella with Olives, Cranberry with Port Wine, Burcin Pepper, Halloumi, Brie Filled with Fruits, Goat Cheese Rolled in Toasted Nuts and many more!!!

Elizabeth Bland and Pomegranate's Gabe Boxer

So many superb selections I can’t possibly cover them all on this short post, gentle reader, you’ll just have to go in and see for yourself. I’ll have to do another post on their wide selection of pre-packaged cheeses from various American manufacturers, including artisanal cheeses.

CS

Elizabeth Bland’s post on her blog

RELATED POSTS

The World of Kosher Cheese – Part 1

05
Feb
10

Le Marais


For the last 15 years, Le Marais has been the yardstick by which all other kosher restaurants are measured, I’ve been there a few times over the years but this time I was determined to speak with José Mireilles. I wanted to understand what makes a good successful restaurateur.

The restaurant has its own full service butcher shop on premises, where the meat is always fresh and the cuts European in style. As a confirmed carnivore I find it hard to pass by without looking over the meat showcase. It affords me a glimpse of the superb dishes to come.

Monsieur Mireilles is Portuguese, he came to this country at the age of 24 to travel for a couple of years before going back to Portugal. Instead he stayed on, graduated from the famed French Culinary Institute and opened various successful restaurants.

I started lunch with Belgian Duvel draft beer, served European style – at room temperature and with over a half inch of head, So unlike the standard American way of no head and chilled. The differences in flavor are appreciable. This beer clings to the glass in almost a marbleized pattern. Outstanding flavor!

For my first dish, I had a Salade de Bettraves.

Salade de Bettraves

It consists of marinated beets with range salad. While I’ve never been a huge fan of beets, these were deliciously juicy and interplayed nicely with the orange pieces for a perfect combination of flavors.

I followed this with Les Rillettes du Boucher.

Les Rillettes de Boucher

Homemade duck and veal spread are cooked together for a long time, then shredded and mashed to a paste, delicately flavored, delightful to the taste! Simple but elegant presentation, designed not to dazzle you visually but merely to enhance the taste experience.

For the main course I had La Surprise.

La Surprise

The cut came from the deckel of the ribeye. This is the steak that every kosher meat restaurant tries to imitate, so far I found the original’s the best! The steak was tender and juicy, the frites crispy, flavorful and lacked the greasiness so characteristic of some other establishments. The salad had a subtle but delightful vinaigrette dressing.

I finished the meal with a delightful dessert, Ananas Caramélisée.

Ananas Caramélisée

Caramelized pineapple with coconut mousse. W hat an amazingly delicious combination!

When I’m at a restaurant, I write down my taste impressions as I eat. There was so much to write about each dish here, about the restaurant itself…  Both José Mireilles and Chef Mark Hennessey’s, passion for food perfection is all too obvious.

The meal amidst an elegant French décor was a memorable one, it’s easy to understand why Le Marais is the standard everyone else is measured by.

CS

Le Marais on Urbanspoon




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 7,650 other followers

Calendar of Posts

July 2014
S M T W T F S
« May    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Archives

Visit our friends at the Kosher Wine Society

Noach: Stranded and Branded

Buy the book…

Category Cloud

18 Restaurant baking baking recipe baking recipes BlogTalkRadio cheese Chef David Kolotkin Chef Jeff Nathan Chef Lévana Chef Lévana Kirschenbaum chicken chicken recipes cookbook authors cookbooks dairy cuisine dairy recipes Esti Berkowitz fine dining fine kosher dining fine kosher dining in Manhattan fine kosher restaurants fine restaurants fish fish recipes Geila Hocherman Gotham Wines & Liquors Internet Radio Irving Schild Jack's Gourmet Jewish history kosher kosher baking kosher baking recipe kosher baking recipes kosher beef kosher beef recipes kosher cheese kosher chefs kosher chicken dishes kosher chicken recipes kosher cookbook authors kosher cookbooks kosher cookery Kosher cooking kosher cooking classes kosher cooking demos kosher cuisine kosher dairy kosher dairy cuisine kosher dairy recipes kosher desserts kosher dining kosher dining in Brooklyn kosher dining in Manhattan kosher dining in NY kosher fine dining kosher fine wines kosher fish kosher fish recipes Kosher food kosher Israeli wine kosher Italian cuisine kosher meat dishes kosher meat recipes kosher meat restaurants kosher meat restaurants in Manhattan kosher Mediterranean cuisine kosher parve recipes kosher poultry dishes kosher poultry recipes kosher recipes kosher restaurant review Kosher restaurants kosher restaurants in Brooklyn kosher restaurants in Manhattan kosher restaurants in New York City kosher restaurants in NY Kosher Revolution Kosher Scene kosher soup recipes kosher wine kosher wines Lévana Lévana Kirschenbaum meat recipes parve recipes Passover Pomegranate Supermarket poultry poultry recipes Prime Grill Royal Wine Corporation Shavuos Shavuos recipes Susie Fishbein The Kosher Scene The Kosher Scene Radio Show Uncategorized Wine

BlogTopSites


<a href="//www.blogtopsites.com/food-drink/" title="Food & Drink Blogs" target="_blank"><img style="border:none" src="//www.blogtopsites.com/v_158881.gif" alt="Food & Drink Blogs" />
<a target="_blank" href="//www.blogtopsites.com" style="font-size:10px;">blog sites


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,650 other followers

%d bloggers like this: