Archive for the 'kosher recipes' Category



17
Aug
11

Lamb Soup


I like lamb, it is one of my favorite meats. Whether in a soup or in any other form, if a dish has lamb in it I just have to try it. Whether it’s those superb  Slow Roasted Lamb Chops at Mike’s Bistro or the Lamb Soup at Yummy Grill, SYR and I – hardcore carnivores both – are in total agreement that lamb is in a class of its own, we love it!

Recently, while going over some old papers I found cooking notes by my long departed mother in them the following recipe:

Lamb Soup

Yields 4

Ingredients

  • 5 1/2 ounces lean tender lamb
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 5 cups chicken soup
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2 inch piece lemongrass, sliced into very thin rounds
  • 1/4 teaspoon chili paste (I make my own from a recipe I found online, here)
  • 8 cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • 4 scallions, finely sliced
  • 1 3/4 ounces bean sprouts snapped in half
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves
  • 1 tablespoonolive oil.

 Directions
  1. Trim away all the fat from the lamb and slice it thinly. Cut slices into bite sized pieces. Put the meat in a layer on a plate and sprinkle with the garlic and 1 tablespoon soy sauce. Cover it and let marinate for one hour.
  2. In a saucepan bring the chicken stock, ginger, lemongrass, remaining soy sauce and the chili paste. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
  3. When ready to serve the soup, drop the tomatoes, scallions, bean sprouts and cilantro leaves into the stock.
  4. Heat oil in a skillet, add the lamb and marinade. Strir fry the meat until is no longer red and divide among the 4 bowls.
  5. Add the hot soup to each bowl and serve immediately.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy. I did!
CS
16
Aug
11

Boeuf Bourguignon – “One of the Most Delicious Beef Dishes…”


Originating among France’s Burgundy peasantry, this dish was elevated to the status of haute cuisine by none other than the King of Chefs and the Chef of Kings (as the French press and Kaiser Wilhelm II referred to him) – Auguste EscoffierJulia Child in her Mastering the Art of French Cooking, refers to Boeuf Bourguignon as ”certainly one of the most delicious beef dishes concocted by man.”

While looking for a kosher version that might do justice to Ms. Child’s praises, I came across this scrumptious recipe in Lévana Kirschenbaum‘s latest book, The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen, page 164:

Detail of photo by: Meir Pliskin on page 165 of The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen

Boeuf Bourguignon

Spend a wonderful evening with a few French classics and some wine to go with dinner! By the way, my bourguignon has been included in Joan Schwartz’s charming book, deceptively innocent, called Meat and Potatoes. My secret ingredient is crème de cassis, the wonderful black currant liqueur.

This dish reheats very well and improves with age, so go ahead and make it a day or two ahead.

  • 4 pounds beef or bison shoulder, cut into 2 inch cubes for stew
  • 6 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 2 cups dry wine
  • 1/4 cup crème de cassis
  • 2 large tomatoes, diced small
  • 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • 6 bay leaves, or 1 teaspoon ground
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only(or throw in the sprigs in whole, but don’t forget to discard them at the end of cooking)
  •  2 pounds very thin long carrots, peeled (about 20)
  • 20 very small organic potatoes, scrubbed (only organic potatoes are safe with skins on)
  • 2 dozen tiny onions, peeled and left whole (frozen OK: they are already peeled)
On a stove top: Place beef, water, and oil in a heavy, wide-bottom pot. Bring to a boil. Reduce to medium and cook covered for 2 hours. Add the garlic, wine, creme de cassis, tomatoes, pepper, and bay leaves and cook for 30 more minutes. Add thyme, carrots, potatoes, and onions and cook for 30 minutes. The meat should be fork tender, Transfer meat and all vegetables on platter with a slotted spoon. If the liquid left in the pot is too thin, reduce it on a high flame until it is thickened, the consistency of maple syrup. Pour the reduced liquid over the whole dish and serve hot. Will make 8 to 10 servings.
With a Crock-Pot: Layer all the ingredients except the water (no water) in a 6-quart Crock-Pot, in the order they were given. Set the Crock-Pot on low in the morning. It will be ready for dinner (10 to 12 hours total cooking time).
Variation: Try the dish using dark stout beer instead of wine, as my daughter in law Ruthie does.
As you taste this you’ll certainly agree with Julia Child’s assessment. So… enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS
15
Aug
11

Salmon in Lemon Sauce


It’s hard to believe that until about 21 months ago I had never eaten fish, other than a small piece of gefilte on Friday evenings (and even then, none too willingly!). Having learned how to enjoy them, thanks to Orchideä and the defunct Avenue Plaza Dining (both in Boro Park), I now savor the taste and appreciate the nutritional value of that which for decades I’d considered untouchable, inedible, food.

Since, I’ve made this recipe a few times because it tastes great and it’s easy:

Salmon in Lemon Sauce

Ingredients

  • 4 tbsp. margarine
  • 1 lb. salmon filets
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 tsp tarragon
  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • 1 tsp. fresh chopped parsley
  • 1 pinch oregano
  • 3 oz. dry white wine
  • 2 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tsp. capers
  • 1 tbsp. cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup cream
  • 1/2 cup milk

Directions

  1. Melt 2 tbsp butter in a skillet. Lightly salt and pepper the fish. Cook the fish over medium-high heat for about 4 to 5 minutes on each side.
  2. Add the tarragon, garlic, parsley, oregano. When garlic browns add capers, white wine and lemon juice. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Remove fish from fire to a plate keeping it warm as you make the sauce. Melt the remaining butter in the same skillet. Whisk in the cornstarch; when smooth, add the cream and milk, whisking until smooth, cook until it thickens.
  4. Simmer for one minute, return the fish to the pan, and reheat for another minute. Top fish with sauce and serve with rice.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS
31
Jul
11

Wellness Wednesday at JCC in Deal Park, NJ


Summertime in Deal is a swell of activity. CS and I stopped by the Deal Park JCC for the Kick-Off Event of their annual Jersey Shore Summer Film Festival. The ‘thought-provoking’ short and full length films feature filmmakers from around the world including Israel, Italy, Canada, Argentina, Australia and, of course, the US. The shorts include selections from the Ma’aleh School of Television, Film and the Arts dealing with issues ranging from the conflicts of love, war and religion in Israel to an insider’s look in to the life of a vegetable retailer in the souk to a survivor who lives to dance. Feature films include exciting titles like The Last Marranos, Only a Number and The Quarrel. The festival kicked off on July 27th and will continue until August 7th. For tickets and more info call 732 531 9106.

Stevie Doueck, the Festival’s Founding Director, graciously hosted us for part of the day; it was Wellness Wednesday featuring fitness classes, nutrition advice, the inspirational film Forks over Knives with a health discussion led by Sari Dan and a keynote address by
Dr. Frank Sabatino, a nutrition and wellness lifestyle counselor who incorporates chiropractic alignment, auriculotherapy and nutritional supplements in his private practice (whose work will be featured on the Kosher Scene’s Radio Show, time to be announced).

Jonny Zemmol, led a Laughter Therapy group, judging by the participants reactions during and after it was obviously fun, educational and a true release

We got to sample Fortune Debbah’s healthy salad dressings, which were simple to prepare and simply delicious. I’ve included one of her salad dressing recipes and a variation. The day’s festivities also included a healthy vegan lunch and dinner.

Fortune Debbah shared a recipe and a variation with the audience:


Garlic Basil Salad Dressing

Ingredients

  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 cup basil
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • Equal amount of water as juice yield
  • 2 teaspoons flax seed
  • 1 small piece of onion (optional)
  • 5 nuts (walnuts)
  • Sea salt or braggs to taste
Directions
Mix all ingredients in blender and use immediately
Variation
1 cup mint instead of basil, skip the cumin
We hope to bring you an interview with Fortune Debbah very soon, meanwhile, enjoy the salad dressing. Marlene Mamiye from The Jewish Hostess alerted us to this festival and we are glad she did!
SYR
25
Jul
11

Aromas of Aleppo


Poopa Dweck‘s magnum opus is far more than just an ethnic cookbook. In its pages, the author lovingly brings us the history, the culture, the flavors and aromas of over 2500 years of Syrian Jewry.

As the author tells us in the Preface, the book…

…features dishes that are both disarmingly familiar, exotic, and, above all, healthful.

My community represents a link to a forgotten past. It is one of the few Jewish communities to live through the rise and fall of Moorish Spain and the Ottoman Empire and survive as a modern people in the West while maintaining its venerable traditions. Our soulful culture, with its fervid, tuneful songs and communal celebratory feasts, is at its most vibrant during the Sabbath, holidays, and life cycle events. One of the most artful representations of Aleppian Jewish culture is our food, whose story I have yearned to tell.

By coincidence (is there really such a thing?!?) I was playing Rabbi Moshe Tessone‘s CD Odeh La’El!, as I became engrossed in this coffee table sized, art-book quality tome. The writing is informative and fun, the evocative photography (the colors, the settings, the lighting, the angles, bespeak of a certain rusticity and a sedate elegance at the same time) and the recipes truly introduced me to a world which – as an Ashkenazic Jew – I barely knew. Between this beautiful book and the music I felt transported to another time, to an enchanted region, far from the hustle and bustle of New York and – at least for the moment – life seemed beautiful, simple and far more pure…

Looking through the old photographs, looking at the author’s family, looking at the recipes pictured, almost made me feel as if I was partaking of a holiday meal at her table.

While loeafing though the book I just had to immediately try a recipe. On page 162 I found one that called for some of my leftover matzah meal and tamarind concentrate, which I’d picked up in the nearby Sephardic neighborhood in Brooklyn.

Keftes

Tamarind-Stewed Meatballs

Meatball dishes such as keftes are a tradition all over the Middle East. Some regions use turmeric and others use sumac or lemon and mintas flavoring accents for similar meatballs. Aleppian Jews like to use a combination of tomato sauce and tamarind, the proportions of which can vary according to a family’s preference.

Meatballs:

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 3 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons matzah meal
  • 1 tablespoon Aleppo pepper or 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
Sauce:
  • One 6 ounce can tomato paste, or two 8 ounce cans tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon ou (tamarind concentrate, page 41), homemade or store bought
  • Juice of 1 lemon (about 3 tablespoons)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar (optional)
  • 2 tablespoon vegetable oil
  1. To make the meatballs, combine the the beef, eggs, matzah meal, salt and Aleppo pepper. Mix well by hand. The mixture should be loose and moist so that it can best absorb the sauce and retain a velvety texture. Shape the meat mixture into walnut-size balls.
  2. To make the sauce, combine the tomato paste, ou, lemon juice, salt, 1 cup of water, and, if desired, sugar, mix well.
  3. In a large ovenproof saucepan, brown the meatballs, one batch at a time, in the oil over medium-high heat for about 3 minutes per batch.
  4. Return all the meatballs to the saucepan. Pour the sauce over the meatballs and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes to thicken sauce and allow the flavors to integrate thoroughly.

Variation

For a tangier sauce, increase the ou by 1 1/2 teaspoons and increase the water by 1/2 cup. Or omit the ou altogether for a lighter, more refreshing sauce, especially if you are serving another dish with ou.

Yield: 8 to 10 servings

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy! Sifrah daimeh – “May your table always be plentiful”

CS

18
Jul
11

A Cookbook For All Seasons


When I’m doing some serious cooking for a group of family or friends, with a limited amount of time to get the job done, I take a pass on my more fluff-and-glitz cookbooks and gravitate towards the ones that I can rely on to provide me with clear concise foolproof instructions, guaranteed reliable delicious results delivered with relative ease.

And that’s precisely what you can expect from Lévana Kirschenbaum’s new cookbook The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen – Glorious Meals Pure and Simple.

Though aesthetically the book’s layout is rather ordinary looking, the content is superb. It’s jam-packed with healthy mains, soups, salads, pastas, beads and desserts; aside from the general index, the cookbook includes a Passover index and a gluten-free index, with recipe notations indicating gluten free or gluten free adaptable. The recipes and text reflect a seasoned master chef who poured her culinary heart and soul into this cookbook. All content is meticulously organized and the format though visually lackluster nonetheless delivers the author’s usual witty humor and éclat in a most lively entertaining way.

Truly a hitchhiker’s guide to all things good-for-you and delicious, you’ll get never-ending use out of this comprehensive culinary work. The variations that accompany the recipes are awesome as are the tips and running commentary that weave through the pages. It’s like having a master chef or super balabusta mom right there with you preparing your best. Meir Pliskin’s photographs are tastefully done though the publisher’s cropping and cheap printing is somewhat disappointing. Lisa Young’s nutritional info though not revolutionary in content, serves as a useful reminder of healthy choices.

From the book, on page 171:

Roasted Vegetables GF P

Everyone likes a plate of grilled veggies, to eat as is or to use as a filling for sandwiches. I have chosen to share the most ridiculously simple way. First of all, my “grilled” vegies are roasted, requiring no turning over and no maintenance. Second, the trick is endives, radishes, brussel sprouts and fennel; but you will roast carrots, sweet potatoes, parsnips, potatoes separately because they have a longer cooking time. Roast beets all by themselves so they don’t bleed into your other veggies, or use the wonderful golden beets now available at all good produce stores. For all roasting, remember, one layer, no piling! Lining the baking sheet with foil reduces, or sometimes eliminates, cleaning.

When the vegetables are roasted, go ahead and get a little fancier, if you wish, toss in a little olive oil, chopped fresh basil, a few drops of balsamic vinegar and a little ground pepper. Most often I add nothing at all!

2 large zucchini, cut in sticks
2 large red onions, sliced thick
3 large red peppers, cut in large sections
1 large eggplant, cut in sticks
2 large portobello mushrooms, cups and stems separated, stems cut in half
Sea salt to taste

Preheat the oven to 450 F. Line a large cookie sheet (you might need 2) with foil. Spray heavily with vegetable spray. Place the vegetables snuggly and in one layer on the cookie sheet.

Spray heavily again with vegetable spray. Sprinkle with sea salt to taste. Bake for about 30 minutes, or until the vegetables look slightly charred. The mushrooms (or string beans or asparagus) might be ready first. Slice the mushrooms on a bias when they are cool enough to handle.

The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen cookbook is all about eating right without missing out on taste or style. The key is using healthy, wholesome, fresh ingredients combining flavors with such mastery your palate will think there is magic at play. It’s really the years of trial and error honing skills that have truly reached their apex of expertise. Lévana epitomizes her own quoting of Antoine de Saint Exupery’s words (at the bottom of page 17): “Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

Don’t miss this essential kitchen tool!

SYR

17
Jul
11

Events of the Week


Just because it’s summer and Brooklyn’s Jewish neighborhoods’ street are half empty doesn’t mean that New York has become a ghost town. Kosher events abound and our favorites for this coming week are:

Monday, July 18th at 7:00pm (Eastern Time)

Lévana’s Moroccan Feast Part 2: Salad Buffet

Please make certain to register to the demo, as the venue has moved to my apartment!

We grew up eating no end of salads at almost every meal: Is it any wonder we loved our veggies and ate them without any prompting? I am even including a dessert salad. True to form, we will bake an authentic Moroccan bread to go with the feast so we don’t leave a drop of sauce behind (this bread is the only item on the menu that will not be gluten-free).

I’ll be demonstrating:

  • Matbookha
  • Grated carrot salad
  • Roasted pepper salad
  • Spicy lettuce and chick pea salad with salmon
  • Tomato salad
  • Eggplant salad
  • Minted orange, endive and romaine salad
  • Moroccan Bread

Click Here to Register!

Registrations: A gentle reminder – Please register at least two days before any cooking class demo so A) We know for sure we have a demo going, and B) We have ample servings!

P.S. Throw in a C) – It makes my life easier :-) P.P.S. Throw in a D) I’ll give you a free signed copy of my new cookbook if you bring a new friend!

Also starting tomorrow you can take advantage of a great, reasonably priced menu at 18 Restaurant:

240 East 81st Street, New York – (212) 517-2400

THE KOSHER SCENE SPECIAL DINNER PRIX FIXE MENU

$32.00 per person, tax and gratuities not included. All wine, beer and alcohol billed separately.
Any item ordered, not on the Prefix will be billed separately

May not be used in conjunction with ANY other special

APPETIZER

Combination Platters:

Humus, Babaganuosh, Turkish Salad, Tahini

Mixed Green Salads

Assorted Breads

Photo by: seamlessweb.com

ENTREE

Eighteen Mixed Grill Kebob Special Combo Platter:

Chicken

Beef

Side Dishes: Choice of 2

grilled vegetables

french fries

mashed potatoes

basmati rice

DESSERT

Coffee/tea

Assorted Rugelach or Slice of Cake

Cold beverage (non alcohol) included

The food’s delicious, the price is very reasonable, the portions are generous, the ambiance is elegantly casual, a perfect eatery to take your wife, your date or the family. Go ahead, treat yourself! All of you deserve it. (For this Prix Fixe, please print out the following  .pdf)

18 Restaurant
240 East 81st. Street (map)
New York, NY
Telephone 212.517.2400
www.eighteenrestaurant.com

CS

27
Jun
11

Internet Radio Broadcast and a Recipe


Last week we were plagued by some faulty equipment and technical problems during our live broadcast from Nargila Grill (1599 York Avenue – between 84 and 85th Streets on Manahattan’s Upper East Side). Today I did a makeup broadcast where I summarized what everyone said during the discussion we had on the Jewish cuisine, as a record of our history, dispersion and culture.

Our group consisted of Alessandra Rovati (dinnerinvenice.com), Geila Hocherman (kosherrevolution.com), Kim Amzallag (Kosher Inspired/Mishpacha Magazine) Levana Kirschenbaum (levanacooks.com), Marlene Mamiye (thejewishhostess.com) and Suzannah Raff (koshershopaholic.wordpress.com/)

Palov - Photo by: Kim Amzallag

After some mild and spicy salads, hummus, and more we were served palov – a Bukharian rice and beef dish. It was delicious but I couldn’t get the restaurant to share its recipe, so I was forced to go online to search for it. Here’s what I found on about.com:

Bukharian Rice – Plov

My 12-year-old son, who is by far our family’s pickiest eater, came home from his friend’s house singing praises about this amazing rice dish. The song went something like this, “It was the most delicious dinner I have ever eaten in my whole life!” Of course I immediately called Ilanit for the recipe. I was happy to discover he was talking about a rice, chicken, vegetable combination prepared in one pot. Without further ado, enjoy Ilanit’s Bukharian Rice recipe.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 3 onions, chopped
  • 6 carrots, grated thick
  • 5 Tablespoons oil (enough to cover bottom of pot)
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 2-3 pounds (1-1.5 kilo) boneless chicken breast, cut into small bite-size squares
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 1/2 cups rice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt rice
  • 3 1/2 cups boiling water (enough to cover the rice by 1/2 inch or 1 cm)

Preparation:

1. Heat oil in a pot. Add onions, and then carrots. Stir in the sugar. Cook until the onions are translucent.
2. Lay the chicken on top of the onions and carrots. Don’t stir in order to maintain a layer of vegetables and a distinct layer of meat. Sprinkle salt and pepper on the chicken. Cook the chicken, gently turning the pieces over in the middle, until the chicken turns white.
3. Add rice on top of the chicken. Don’t stir because the layers of vegetables and chicken should remain undisturbed, but distribute the rice evenly over the chicken. Sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Add boiling water. Turn the heat down to low and cover.
4. After about 15 minutes, scrap down the sides and poke a few holes through the rice to the bottom of the pot with the handle of a wooden spoon. Cover and cook for another 15-25 minutes, until the water has been absorbed and the rice is tender.
5. Serve in reverse order of the layers. Put the rice, then the chicken, then the vegetables onto the plates.Yields: 6-8 servings.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy. We did!
CS
23
Jun
11

The Winning Recipe Is…


On May 12th, we announced this year’s Shavuos Contest, as a result we received 26 entries. Some were great, others mediocre. We agonized over which deserved to win, but in the end SYR and I agreed that Pessy Haskelevich‘s entry was the best.

Here is her prize:

The prize basket consisted of all cholov Yisroel N&K cheeses: Slices of Cheddar, Pepper Jack, Swiss, Horseradish Cheddar, Smoked Provolone, Part skim Mozzarella, Muenster, 8 oz chunks of Cheddar, Muenster, Pepper Jack and Mozzarella, 2 tubes each of Fresh Plain Goat cheese and Cranberry Pecan Goat cheese, shredded Pizza, Part Skim Mozzarella and Mexican Blend; sticks of Mozzarella Sticks and Variety Pack and 12 slice packs of White American and Yellow American (Photo by: Anderson International Foods)

Who is Ms. Haskelevich? She’s a food and wine specialist and private chef. She’s catered numerous wine pairing dinners, done Shabatot at hotels, she also does cooking demos for adults and cooking clubs for kids. While talking to Pessy through email I found her very creative, witty and knowledgeable about wine and the delicate nuances of food. You may contact her at: anatomyof taste@gmail.com.

Beet and Asparagus Crostatta

Whether sweet or savory a crostatta is less fussy than a traditional tart and offers a more crisp crust. Use your imagination to change it up throughout the year; butternut squash and red onions in winter, tomatoes and corn in summer and this can easily be dessert if you add ¼ cup sugar to the dough and fill it with fresh fruit.

Photo by: Pessy Haskelevich

Ingredients

Pastry:

  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 stick cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 4-6 tablespoons ice-cold water
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten

Filling:

  • 2 pounds beets, cut in half and thinly sliced
  •  1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  •  3 tablespoons olive oil
  •  20 mint leaves chopped
  •  salt and pepper to taste
  •  4 stalks asparagus cut into 3 inch pieces
  •  4 oz ricotta or soft goat cheese (optional)
  •  ¼ cup walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped

Directions

Dough

  1. Pulse flour and salt in the food processor. Add the butter and pulse 10 times or until mixture resembles a coarse meal. 
  2. Drizzle ice water evenly over mixture and pulse until it just forms a ball. (Do not overwork dough, or pastry will be tough.) 
  3. Gently press dough into a 5-inch disk and chill, wrapped in plastic wrap, until firm, at least 1 hour.
Filling
  1. Preheat oven to 400°F with rack in middle.
  2. Toss beets with vinegar, olive oil, salt, pepper and mint.  Set aside
Crostatta
  1. Roll out dough into a 13-inch round on a lightly floured surface with a lightly floured rolling pin. 
  2. Transfer to a baking sheet lined with slightly greased parchment paper.
Final Instructions
  1. Distribute the chopped walnuts in the center of the dough leaving a 2-3 inch border.  
  2. Leaving the juices behind arrange the beets with the asparagus on top of the walnuts.  If using cheese, dot the top of the crostatta with small pieces of ricotta or goat cheese.  
  3. Fold dough in on itself to cover outer rim of filling, pleating dough as necessary. 
  4. Drizzle a tiny bit of olive oil and freshly ground pepper all over top of the crostata.  
  5. Brush pastry with beaten egg and bake galette until crust is cooked through and golden on edges, 40-45 minutes. 
  6. Cool on baking sheet on a rack 10 minutes before serving.
Well, gentle folks, this recipe is more than just award winning delicious. So… enjoy!
(On the coming week, we  will feature the two runner up recipes)
CS
12
May
11

Date and Nut Bread


I had some dates from Israel and decided to use them in a recipe, I was intrigued by the following one from Elizabeth Wolfe-Cohen‘s Perfect Jewish 


Delicious!!!

Date & Nut Bread

Yields: 12 slices

Directions

  • 1 1/2 cups self rising flour, plus a little more for dusting
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 – 1 tsp ground ginger [SYR used 1 tsp]
  • 1 1/3 cups chopped dried dates [SYR did not use dried ones]
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda [baking soda]
  • 2/3 cup boiling water
  • 1 egg lightly beaten
  • 1 tsp butter or margarine, softened [SYR used margarine to keep it pareve]
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts, pecans or almonds [SYR used walnuts]
Directions
Preheat the oven to 325 F. Grease a 4″x8″ loaf pan. Line the base and and sides with nonstick baking parchment paper to come to 1″ above the sides. Grease again and dust with flour. Sift the flour, salt and ginger into a bowl.
Put the dates into a large bowl with bicarbonate of soda. Pour over the boiling water and leave to stand for 5 minutes.
Stir the egg and butter [or margarine if you prefer it pareve] and flour mixture into the date mixture and beat with a wooden spoon until well blended. Stir in the nuts. Pour the mixture into the loaf pan, smoothing the top. Tap the pan gently on a surface to expel any air bubbles.
Bake in the center of the oven for 1 hour or until set and well colored and the bread begins to pull away from the sides of the pan; a knife inserted in the center should come out clean.
Transfer to a wire rack to cool for 5 minutes , then leave to cool completely Using the paper as a guide, carefully remove the bread from the pan. If not serving the same day keep in the paper to prevent drying out.To serve, remove the paper from the base and sides, slice thinly.
Prep time: 20 minutes – Bake Time – 1 hour

The bread came out very aromatic, it tasted subtly sweet, we had it with some cholov Yisroel Mascarpone cheese made at Pomegranate Supermarket‘s kitchen and recommended by their resident cheese expert, none other than our good friend Elizabeth Bland. We washed it down with a Herzog Selection Chateneuf 2009, a white semi dry with a fresh, fruity bouquet. The bread was delicious, the Mascarpone just right, and the wine proved a perfect pairing!

CS




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