Archive for the 'kosher pasta recipes' Category

16
Jul
12

Spaghetti with Ricotta


Anyone who’s been following this blog knows that I am a hardcore carnivore, but I also like pasta with cheese. With the Nine Days fast approaching, it’s time to look for some succulent dairy recipes, here’s one that is easy to make and delicious.

Spaghetti with Ricotta

(Adapted from The Big Book Of Pasta)

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 12 oz dried spaghetti
  • 3 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh-flat  leaf parsley
  • 1 1/2 cups freshly ground almonds
  • 1/2 cup ricotta cheese
  • pinch of grated  nutmeg
  • pinch of ground cinnamon
  • 2/3 cup sour cream
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 cup pareve broth*
  • 1 tbsp pine nuts
  • salt and pepper
  • fresh flat-leaf parsley sprigs, to garnish

Directions

  1. Bring a large, heavy bottom pan of lightly salted water to a boil. Add the spaghetti, return to a boil, and cook for 8-10 minutes, or until tender but still firm to the bite.
  2. Drain the pasta, return to the pan, and toss with the butter and chopped parsley. Keep warm.
  3. To make the sauce, mix the ground almonds, ricotta cheese, nutmeg, cinnamon, and sour cream together in a small pan  over low heat to form a thick paste. Gradually stir in the olive oil. When the oil has been fully incorporated, gradually stir in the stock, until sauce is smooth. Season to taste with pepper.
  4. Transfer the spaghetti to a warmed serving dish, pour over the sauce, and toss together well. Sprinkle over the pine nuts, garnish with the parsley sprigs, and serve warm.

* Parve Chicken Free Broth

Ingredients

  • 4 cups water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 parsnip (8 – 12 inches)
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1/2 large red onion
  • 1/2 medium sweet onion
  • 1/2 clove garlic
  • 1 stalk celery
  • 4 oz mushrooms
  • 1/4 tsp tumeric
  • Seasonings to taste

Directions

  1. Take out a pot large pot. This will allow room for boiling, stirring and simmering without making a spill on the stove top. Chunk up the parsnips, carrots, and onions. Coarsely chop the garlic, mushrooms and celery. Pour the water into the pan. Turn heat on to medium high flame.
  2. Add all vegetables. (You can run everything through the food processor using the shredding blade. This goes a lot faster and reduces the simmer time as it increases the surface area of the veggies). When the water becomes warm stir in the turmeric. Bring to boil and boil for 2 – 3 minutes. Reduce heat to simmer. (If you are using an electric stove top you can bring everything to a boil and immediately reduce heat to simmer as it will take 2-3 minutes for the temperature to fall to a simmer)
  3. After about 15 minutes begin to add your seasonings – pepper, rosemary, ginger – whatever you like but IN SMALL AMOUNTS as you can always add more but cannot take it out. Be sure to get your seasonings set within the first 45 minutes. This will allow the seasonings to blend and incorporate into the soup. Let simmer for a total of 2 – 3 hours.
  4. Strain through a professional kitchen sieve or use a colander lined with coffee filters. Use the broth just like you would chicken broth.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

06
Jun
12

Penne with Creamy Mushrooms


Last evening I had pasta, it was absolutely delicious! I like to cook with wine and this was just a perfect experiment that succeeded fully.

Penne With Creamy Mushroom

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons butter (or margarine if you prefer to keep it pareve or will use use during a meat meal)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 6 shallots, sliced
  • 1 pound cremini mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 teaspoon all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup Velouté sauce (or MimiCreme if you prefer to keep it pareve)
  • 2 tablespoons Port wine
  • 4 ounces sun-dried tomatoes in oil, drained and chopped
  • pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 12 ounces dried penne
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley, for garnishing

Directions

  1. Melt the butter with the olive oil in a large, heavy bottom skillet. Add the shallots  and cook over a low heat, stirring occasionally , for 4 to 5 minutes, or until softened. Add the mushrooms and cook over low heat for an additional 2 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper, sprinkle in the flour, and cook, stirring for 1 minute.
  2. Remove skillet from heat and gradually stir in the Velouté sauce (or MimiCreme) and Port wine. Return to the heat, add the sun-dried tomatoes and grated nutmeg, and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, bring a large bottom pan of lightly salted water to a boil. Add the pasta, return to a boil, and cook for 8 to 10 minutes, or until tender but still firm to the bite. Drain the pasta well and add the mushroom sauce, cook for 3 minutes, then transfer to a warmed serving dish. Sprinkle with the chopped parsley and serve immediately.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy; I did!

CS

27
Jan
12

Homemade Lokshen


Pasta was a staple in our home as I was growing up, whether it was the influence of the Italian neighbors or something my mother learned back in Poland in her mother’s kitchen I’ll never know. The freshly made noodles, in a good old fashioned hot chicken or beef soup, were just the right food for winter days, or she’d just use them for her delicious loskshen mit rozhinkes (raisins) kugel.

Of course you can buy ready made noodles but… they’ll NEVER taste the same!!! This recipe is very simple, easy, to make:

Home Made Lokshen

Yields: 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups all purpose flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1/2 cup salt, plus extra for cooking
  • 2-3 eggs, beaten

Directions

  1. Put the flour and salt into a food processor, with the machine running add two-thirds of the beaten eggs. If the dough is too firm, add more egg, slowly and process again until a soft dough forms (the dough should be flexible, not sticky). Turn it onto a floured surface and need for about 12 minutes, or until smooth and elastic. Cover it with an inverted bowl for about 30 minutes.
  2. Cut the dough in half. Starting with one of the halves, roll out – on a lightly floured work surface – as thinly as possible into a 14 inch square. Transfer to a large floured baking sheet and repeat all the steps with the second piece of dough. Leave to dry for 25 minutes.
  3. When the dough surface looks dry, fold the dough loosely in half then in half again and repeat until you have a loosely folded strip of dough about 2 inches wide.. With a sharp knife, slice crosswise, straight down on one movement without dragging the knife into 1/8 to 1/2 inch wide.
  4. Unroll the noodles, gently shaking to separate. Leave to rest for 1 minute. If not using immediately, hang the noodles over a wooden rack to dry.
  5. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add all the noodles at once, cover and return to a boil. Cook for 2 minutes for the wider noodles slighly less for the thinner ones. As soon as the noodles rise to the surface they are cooked. Drain into a colander and serve in soup, toss with butter and cheese, or refresh under cold water to use in other recipes.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

23
Jan
12

Tomato Broth and Angel Hair Pasta


I always liked tomato, I always liked pasta, I always liked soup in winter. When I came across a simple, easy to prepare, recipe that combined all three, it was obvious I had to try it. When I made it last eve, I knew it would become an instant favorite. From The Big Book of Pasta:

Tomato Broth and Angel Hair Soup

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 lb 2 oz ripe tomatoes, peeled and halved.
  • 8 garlic cloves, peeled but left whole
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon saffron threads, slightly crushed
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 bouquet garni
  • 2 inch strip thinly paired lemon rind
  • 2 1/2 cups vegetable or chicken stock
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 10 oz angel hair pasta
  • salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Put the tomatoes, garlic cloves, onion, saffron, sugar, bouquet garni, and lemon rind into a large, heavy bottom pan. Pour in the stock and bring the to a boil, lower the heat, cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 25-30 minutes, until the tomatoes have disintegrated.
  2. Remove the pan from the heat and let cool slightly. Remove and discard the garlic cloves, bouquet garni and lemon rind. Ladle the tomato mixture into a food processor or blender and process to a purée.
  3. Return the purée to the rinsed out pan and season to taste with salt and pepper. Stir in the olive oi, add the pasta and bring to a boil. Cook for 2-4 minutes, until tender but still firm to the bite.
  4. Taste and adjust the seasoning, if necessary. Ladle the broth and pasta into warmed soup bowl and serve immediately.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

04
Aug
11

A Simple Favorite Pasta Dish


A recipe need not be elaborate to make a tasty dish, especially in these hot days, there is no need to spend a long time in the kitchen. Here’s One of my favorite ways to prepare a simple but delicious pasta and it’s great for the Nine Days or anytime.

Spaghetti with Oil and Garlic

Ingredients

  • 1 lb spaghetti
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons fresh, chopped, parsley
  • Salt and pepper
  • chilli pepper flakes (optional)
Directions
  1. In a large pan boil some lightly salted water. Add the spaghetti and boil again, cook for 8 – 9 minutes or until tender but still a bit resistant to the bite (al dente).
  2. In the meantime, while the spaghetti is cooking, heat the oil in a skillet, add the garlic and a pinch of salt cooking over low heat. Stir constantly for 3 – 4 minutes or until golden brown. Do not let the garlic become brown for it will adversely affect the taste. Remove from heat
  3. Drain the spaghetti and put on a large, warmed, serving dish. Pour in the olive oil, add the
  4. For a bit more color and an extra kick in taste, sprinkle sparingly with chili pepper flakes.
Yields 4 Servings
Easy to make and truly delectable. Sometimes, when the mood strikes me, I’ll add some finely grated parmeggiano and will then skip the chili pepper flakes.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS
28
Jan
11

Shabbat Comfort Food


Last Friday we posted Oyfn Pripetchik… – In the Fireplace… with an unusual but interesting kugel recipe. Today we follow up with a very easy recipe for a great Yerushami Kugel. Truth is, I’ve never been a fan of this type of kugel, the idea of sweet pasta just doesn’t do it for me, but, last Monday at Chef Lévana‘s cooking demo I tasted this and was forced to change my mind:

Yerushalmi Kugel

Ingredients

  • 1 pound thin noodles, any noodles (gluten-free will work too!)
  • ⅔ cup vegetable oil
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 teaspoon ground pepper, or a little more to taste
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 4 eggs
  • 3/4 cup sugar or Sucanat
  • 1/4 cup agave syrup
  • 1/2 cup water

An individual portion of Chef Lévanas' Yerushalmi Kugel

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Boil the noodles until just barely tender. If you started with long noodles, cut through the whole pile with scissors until you get smaller pieces.
  3. Place in a mixing bowl, and mix in the oil, pepper, cinnamon, vanilla, and eggs. Combine thoroughly.
  4. Meanwhile, heat the sugar, agave and water in a small saucepan.
  5. Reduce the flame to low and cook about 5 minutes, until the mixture turns a nice amber color (watch the cooking, don’t let the mixture burn).
  6. Immediately add to the noodle mixture and stir to combine.
  7. Pour the mixture into a greased 9 x 13-inch pan or a greased tube pan.
  8. Bake about 1 hour, or a little longer, until the top looks set.

Delicious warm or at room temperature.

Enjoy, gentle reader, and have a gutten Shabbos, Shabbat shalom umevorach!

CS

11
Jan
11

Salt… – Part 1


As we are on the verge of a blizzard again (starting sometime this afternoon) and since salt will be used to melt the snow, it reminded me that we should look at its various types and their role in cooking. Salt is the oldest known spice, its flavor is versatile, it is a staple of cooks and bakers.

What’s Cooking America describes its uses:

Enhancing almost every dish, salt is added to breads, meats, fruits and vegetables to sauces and desserts.

Additionally, salt aids foods in a variety of ways like:

Preservation – helps protect against microorganisms, bacteria through dehydration and preventing growth of bacteria, which slows or prevents spoilage.

Texture Aid – in bread making, allows the dough to rise by giving helping the gluten hold more water and carbon dioxide. In meats it improves tenderness and in cheeses it aids in consistency of the cheese and the hardness of the rind.

Binder – in processed meats it helps retain water which reduces the loss of meat when cooking.

Color Developer – in processed meats it helps obtain the desired color. It also helps create a golden crust for breads.

Fermentation Control – slows and controls the fermentation process in:

  • Pickling
  • Cheese production
  • Sauerkraut production
  • Summer sausage production

The Food Network, talks about the three main types:

Photo from: virtualweberbullet.com

What is the difference between kosher salt, sea salt, and table salt?

For the cook’s purposes, the main difference between salts is in their texture. Table salt’s fine granules dissolve quickly, making it the preferred salt of bakers. Sea salt and kosher salt possess larger, irregular grains that add a delightful crunch and hit of briny flavor when sprinkled on food at the last minute. Generally, savvy cooks prefer kosher salt when cooking, since its coarse texture is easier to take a pinch of when seasoning savory dishes.

Chemically there is little difference between kitchen salts. All are at least 97 1/2 percent sodium chloride. But there are significant differences in the provenance and processing of these salts.

Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits, and includes a small portion of calcium silicate, an anti-caking agent added to prevent clumping. It possesses very fine crystals and a sharp taste. Because of its fine grain a single teaspoon of table salt contains more salt than a tablespoon of kosher or sea salt.

Sea salt is harvested from evaporated seawater and receives little or no processing, leaving intact the minerals from the water it came from. These minerals flavor and color the salt slightly. However, because these salts are usually expensive, it is worth keeping in mind that they lose their unique flavor when cooked or dissolved.

Kosher salt takes its name from its use in the koshering process. It contains no preservatives and can be derived from either seawater or underground sources. Aside from being a great salt to keep within arm’s reach when you are cooking, it is particularly useful in preserving, because its large crystals draw moisture out of meats and other foods more effectively than other salts.

Since lately we’ve talking about cheese, I thought I should post here one of my favorite adapted Foodista pasta recipes, Potato Gnocchi with Walnut Sauce:

Potato Gnocchi with Walnut Sauce (Photo from: foodista.com)

Gnocchi Di Patate Con Salsa Di Noci (adapted)

Ingredients

  • 7 ozs walnuts
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 handful parsley leaves
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch cracked black pepper
  • 1 dinner roll or slice of bread, crust removed
  • 1 cup milk
  • olive oil
  • grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon unflavored yogurt
  • cream or half and half

Directions

  1. Put 7 ozs of walnuts, a clove of garlic a handful of parsley, a pinch of salt and freshly ground pepper in a food processor. Process until you have a rough paste. Then add a dinner roll or thick slice of bread, with the crust removed, soaked in milk and squeezed dry, olive oil, grated parmesan cheese and tablespoon of unflavored yogurt. Start processing and, as the you process, add either milk, cream or ‘half-and-half’ through the funnel until the mixture forms a fairly smooth sauce.
  2. Take your gnocchi and boil them in well salted water until they come to the surface of the water. Transfer them from the water with a slotted spoon into a large bowl, add a generous dollop of the walnut sauce, some more grated cheese and, if you like–although some sources call it heresy–a nut of butter. Mix gently with a spatula, adding a bit of the pasta water to thin out the sauce if need be. Serve immediately with additional grated cheese for those who want it.

I’ve made this a few times and I can assure you it is absolutely delicious!

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

16
Dec
10

Cooking Pasta: Debunking the Myth


Part of coming of age and the endless struggle for self is the establishment and ascendance of individual truth, honing mind and temperament, discriminating fact from fancy, empirical evidence from legend and myth.

I thought I had arrived in so many ways and then reality hit me like a flung wet noodle against the wall of my existence. We’ll save for another venue all the charming folktales of my youth soberly and maturedly dispensed with. But there I was, sitting pretty on the comfy wine colored couch, reaching for a bleached white conch shell that sits atop a wicker woven basket poised for reminiscence, aside other brilliant priceless colored stones, crystals, odd shaped rocks and shells randomly picked for their momentary significance and tangible recall. As I held the conch to my ear, I heard the voice of my nine year old neighbor and friend – Batya – herself clearly establishing her own unique truth sets, say:

- You know, that’s not the sound of the ocean you’re hearing, that’s just the echo of the air in the shell.

- What??? That can’t possibly be true, I know it’s the ocean, the waves of the very ocean that the shell came from.

I was not going to let this cute but clearly misinformed enfant terrible wreck my personal objects de time machine recall. Of course, we did what sensible people  do in such circumstances, we checked Wikipedia online.

I shouldn’t have, I know it now….. there are certain life mysteries that are best left alone… but there it was, the total deflation of spirit and romance and everything that’s right with the world….”What you are actually hearing is the sound around you vibrating as an echo in the air within the shell.” Who the heck needed to hear that, to know that? Great! Take the technicolor out of my universe… Hey, absolute reality is not all it’s cracked up to be. I know a butterfly flitting it’s wings impacts the climate at  the opposite end of the globe, and I know with the ten percent of my brain operational part of my brain that yawning is contagious, chicken soup cures a cold and that the five second rule applies. So maybe being primordial isn’t such a bad thing… No such thing as fairy dust?!?!?!? P’shaaaaaawww! What a world, What a world!!!

So talking about cooking pasta. Here I was thinking I had reached maximum maturity when I learned that al dente is très chic, that the “if it sticks” rule really does work and that salt in boiling water is a good thing along with a few drops of oil, so that the pasta doesn’t stick. When I really pay attention, I even cover the pot after its come to a boil and let it stay on low simmer.

Anyway, here are a few things I’ve learned since. Feel free to write in and further debunk my myths.

  1. Use a one to four ratio of water to pasta – four parts water to one part of pasta. Pasta needs room to cook.
  2. Add 1-2 tablespoons of salt for each gallon of water.
  3. Bring it to mighty bubbling boil, and then let it simmer for a minute or two till done.
  4. Don’t add oil… get this: oil makes the pasta slick and then all the wonderful sauces can’t adhere to it.
  5. Furthermore, after you drain the pasta, don’t rinse it. The starchiness too is a binder for whatever you will be adding to your pasta dish. The only exception is when you are making a cold pasta salad, then it is preferable to rinse the pasta first.

See? Some things are worth knowing after all. By the way, that gum I swallowed approaching the shiva house… seven years until it dissolves. Well what you can’t see can’t hurt you, right? Right?

Stir Fry Beef on Penne Pasta (adpated from 6ix Passions)

Ingredients

  • 1 lb penne pasta
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 red onion, cut into strips
  • 1 lb beef, cubed
  • 1 red pepper, cut into strips
  • 1 cup mushrooms, chopped
  • 8 broccoli florettes
  • Mango Salsa
  • 1/2 cup fresh basil
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Cook the penne pasta al dente (cooked through, tender, but still offering some resistance to the bite).
  2. Stir fry beef with Spanish red onion, mushrooms, red peppers and broccoli
  3. Toss on the pasta with mango salsa.
  4. Sprinkle with fresh parsley

Enjoy!

SYR

Stir-Fry Beef on Penne Past

31
Oct
10

Sugar River Cheese Co.


Europeans have long laughed at the pretentiousness of American cheeses (especially kosher ones), but, judging by the latest entries into the field, that situation will soon change. I’ve seen quite a few interesting cheeses at the Pomegranate isles, among them some intriguing flavored ones from the Sugar River Cheese Co. Having tasted these delicious cheeses we just had to contact them and interview Mark Rosen, the company’s President.

I found Mr. Rosen very personable, witty and a true foodie. Besides being a fountain of information on cheese making processes, he also told us some amusing stories about himself, stories that gave us a glimpse into the make up of his love of food and pursuit of quality. That carefully nurtured quest for the best led him to start this company in 2002 with the aim of bringing “natural, terrific tasting, unique, kosher Wisconsin Cheeses to the kosher consumer.” Judging by what we tasted, he certainly succeeded.

The superb tasting Sugar River cheeses we've sampled...

The Sugar River cheeses we’ve sampled were: Parmesan (aged 18 months, my personal favorite), White Cheddar (aged 18 months), White Cheddar with Roasted Garlic and Green Onion, White Cheddar with Chipotle, Prairie Jack with Parsley and ChivePrairie Jack with Green Peppercorns, Monterrey Jack with Jalapeno and Cilantro, Monterrey Jack With Roasted Garlic And Basil (second place award in the Flavored Monterey Jack judging category at the 23rd Annual Competition and Judging by the American Cheese Society‘s (ACS) held July 22, 2006 in Portland, Oregon. The first time Sugar River cheeses ever entered a competition and the first time a kosher cheese ever won!) and Monterey Jack With Tomato And Olive.

SYR, thought this cheeses would go perfectly with some of her favorite pasta recipes. Here’s one she tried which turned out terrific:

SYR‘s Easy Penne Alla Romana

YIELD: 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 package of penne
  • water to fully cover the pasta
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 chopped garlic
  • 6 chopped pearl onions
  • 1/4 cup chopped sun dried tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup zucchini, cubed
  • 10 shitake mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup oyster mushrooms
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 10-15 chopped leaves of fresh basil
  • 2 sprigs of fresh parsley
  • 1/2 package Sugar River White Cheddar with Roasted Garlic and Green Onion
  • Sugar River Parmesan

Aaahh... the aroma, the taste!

Pasta

  1. In a medium size pot pour in water to two thirds height (enough to cover the pasta).
  2. Add the penne and cook until it is al dente (still firm, not hard).

Vegetables

  1. Pour the oil into a medium shallow pan.
  2. Sauté the chopped garlic and onions.
  3. Add the tomatoes when the above show some golden brown.
  4. After 30 seconds add the zucchini and mushrooms.
  5. Let it all cook for 1 minute and add basil and parsley.
  6. take off fire after 2 more minutes.
  7. Add mixture to drained penne

Cheese

  1. Cut the Sugar River White Cheddar with Roasted Garlic and Green Onion into small cubes.
  2. Add the cubes into the mixed penne and vegetable. Continue mixing until cheese is mostly melted.
  3. Sprinkle with shavings of Sugar River Parmesan.
  4. Serve while still hot.

Please remember, by using the 18 month aged Parmesan you have to wait six hours before you can eat meat.

Enjoy, gentle reader, Enjoy!

CS

17
Oct
10

From the Heart of Dixie


Even when I lived outside of the US, whether in Uruguay, Israel, etc., I’d hear about Southern cooking. When I first came to the States in 1962 and moved to Richmond, VA (the capital of the Confederacy), I actually got to taste a few superb kosher variations on the Southern theme.

Recently, I came across Simply Southern – With a Dash of Kosher Soul, a cookbook published by the Margolin Hebrew Academy/Feinstone Yeshiva of the South of Memphis, TN. I couldn’t wait to try out some of the book’s delicacies, I wasn’t disappointed! The recipes are a easy to make, short-cutting more complex directions with readily available ingredients that make preparation a snap. This ain’t no diet cookbook, so if you’ve been watching your waist after yom tov feasting save this for the times when you want to cook quick tasty dishes with that special touch of true Americana.  The recipes are clear, the assortment fun, pretty to look at and absolutely delicious.

For the last week we made quite a few of them and each proved delectable. The recipes are divided into ten sections running from

  • Appetizers and Starters
  • Soups and Sandwiches
  • Salads
  • Brunch & Dairy
  • Pasta, grains & Rice
  • Meats
  • Poultry
  • Fish
  • Vegetables & Side Dishes
  • Desserts

As you can see, it covers the gamut of the most common cooking types. It is hard to chose just one recipe to share, in fact it’s hard to chose, two, three or even four favorites from those we tried. But here are two very Southern selections:

Real Fried Chicken

True Southerners make enough for leftovers. Nothing beats cold fried chicken for lunch the day after. Do not skip the salt! salt is an especially important ingredient to the authentic taste of this signature dish of Dixie!

MARINADE

1 quart water
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons cayenne pepper
2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 1/2 teaspoons white pepper
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

MARINADE

Whisk together water, salt, cayenne, garlic powder, white pepper, soy sauce, and Worcestershire sauce.

CHICKEN

4 cut up chickens
12 cups vegetable oil
Self rising flour
2 eggs, beaten
2 tablespoons water
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon white pepper

CHICKEN

Add chicken pieces to marinade. Toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate for 24 hours.

Heat oil in a deep fryer to 360-375 degrees. Drain marinade from chicken on paper towels and pat dry. Sprinkle chicken on both sides with self-rising flour. Blend eggs and water. Combine all-purpose flour, salt, garlic powder, cayenne and white pepper. Dip chicken in egg wash. Dredge in flour mixture. Place chicken on a large baking sheet. Let sand for 10 minutes. Fry chicken in hot oil turning a few times for 20-25 minutes or until golden browned. Drain on a rack over paper towels.

YIELD: 6 – 8 SERVINGS

For dessert I loved the Chess Pie, I also liked the humor in the intro to this dish.

Chocolate Chess Pie

Chess pie is one of the South’s great contributions to the culinary arts. One folk story asserts that it was originally called “just pie,” which was drawled as “jus’ pie,” eventually rolling off the tongue as “chess pie.” This is always a favorite!

1 1/4 cups sugar
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
4 tablespoons margarine, melted
2 eggs
10 tablespoons soymilk
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 (9-inch) pie shell, unbaked
1 (8-ounce) container frozen whipped topping, thawed
Chocolate syrup

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine sugar, cocoa, and margarine in a bowl. Add eggs and beat until smooth. Blend in soymilk, vanilla and salt. Pour filling into pie shell. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes until tester comes out clean. Cool top with whipped topping. Pie freezes well. Drizzle chocolate syrup across the top!

YIELDS: 8 SERVINGS

Each section starts out with a few short paragraphs detailing the transition of Southern cooking into Kosher cooking or an occasional anecdote to bring the Memphis community a little closer to wherever you are. Liberally sprinkled with humor and folksy story tellin’  Simply Southern – With a Dash of Kosher Soul is sure to change your view of classic American cooking.

Enjoy it, gentle reader, enjoy it in all its finger lickin’ goodness!

CS




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