Archive for the 'kosher meat' Category

25
Dec
12

Stuffed Lamb Shoulder


[A few Shabbatot ago, I had lunch at some Sephardic friends' home; I asked for the recipe of the delicious Lamb Shoulder we had and Mrs. Alma Ohayon emailed me this one. CS]

Stuffed Lamb Shoulder

Serves 6

Photo by: Alma Ohayon

Photo by: Alma Ohayon

Ingredients

  • 1 shoulder of lamb, weighing about 5 lb 8 o, boned and trimmed
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 tbsp flour, blended with 1 tbsp water
  • 1 cup beef or chicken stock

Stuffing

  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 cup lean ground lamb
  • 1/2 cup long grain rice
  • 1/2 cup water
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 cup chopped almonds
  • 1/4 cup raisins
  • 12 no-soak dried apricots, chopped
  • 1 egg, slightly beaten

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F.  Prepare the stuffing. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-heat. Add the onion and cook for 3 to 5 minutes or until it begins to soften. Add the garlic and ground lamb and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring to break up the meat. Stir in the rice and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, or until translucent, stirring frequently.
  2. Stir in the water, salt and pepper, and cumin. Cook covered over medium-low heat for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the liquid is absorbed and the rice is just tender. Remove the from the heat. Add the remaining stuffing ingredients.
  3. Open the meat out flat, skin side down. Spread over the stuffing roll. Roll up tightly and secure with string. Brush with oil. Place on a rack in a roasting pan. Roast for 50 minutes for medium. Brush with honey 15 minutes before the end. Transfer to a serving plate to rest, tented with foil for 15 minutes.
  4. Pour of all except 2 tablespoons of the fat. Set the pan over medium-high heat. Whisk in the flour mixture, stock and vinegar. Bring to a boil while stirring; simmer for 8 minutes, or until thickened. Serve with the lamb.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

16
Aug
11

Boeuf Bourguignon – “One of the Most Delicious Beef Dishes…”


Originating among France’s Burgundy peasantry, this dish was elevated to the status of haute cuisine by none other than the King of Chefs and the Chef of Kings (as the French press and Kaiser Wilhelm II referred to him) – Auguste EscoffierJulia Child in her Mastering the Art of French Cooking, refers to Boeuf Bourguignon as ”certainly one of the most delicious beef dishes concocted by man.”

While looking for a kosher version that might do justice to Ms. Child’s praises, I came across this scrumptious recipe in Lévana Kirschenbaum‘s latest book, The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen, page 164:

Detail of photo by: Meir Pliskin on page 165 of The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen

Boeuf Bourguignon

Spend a wonderful evening with a few French classics and some wine to go with dinner! By the way, my bourguignon has been included in Joan Schwartz’s charming book, deceptively innocent, called Meat and Potatoes. My secret ingredient is crème de cassis, the wonderful black currant liqueur.

This dish reheats very well and improves with age, so go ahead and make it a day or two ahead.

  • 4 pounds beef or bison shoulder, cut into 2 inch cubes for stew
  • 6 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 2 cups dry wine
  • 1/4 cup crème de cassis
  • 2 large tomatoes, diced small
  • 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • 6 bay leaves, or 1 teaspoon ground
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only(or throw in the sprigs in whole, but don’t forget to discard them at the end of cooking)
  •  2 pounds very thin long carrots, peeled (about 20)
  • 20 very small organic potatoes, scrubbed (only organic potatoes are safe with skins on)
  • 2 dozen tiny onions, peeled and left whole (frozen OK: they are already peeled)
On a stove top: Place beef, water, and oil in a heavy, wide-bottom pot. Bring to a boil. Reduce to medium and cook covered for 2 hours. Add the garlic, wine, creme de cassis, tomatoes, pepper, and bay leaves and cook for 30 more minutes. Add thyme, carrots, potatoes, and onions and cook for 30 minutes. The meat should be fork tender, Transfer meat and all vegetables on platter with a slotted spoon. If the liquid left in the pot is too thin, reduce it on a high flame until it is thickened, the consistency of maple syrup. Pour the reduced liquid over the whole dish and serve hot. Will make 8 to 10 servings.
With a Crock-Pot: Layer all the ingredients except the water (no water) in a 6-quart Crock-Pot, in the order they were given. Set the Crock-Pot on low in the morning. It will be ready for dinner (10 to 12 hours total cooking time).
Variation: Try the dish using dark stout beer instead of wine, as my daughter in law Ruthie does.
As you taste this you’ll certainly agree with Julia Child’s assessment. So… enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS
15
Jun
11

Perfect Jewish


Published by Parragon Publishing, UK; 2008

From the dust cover:

The unique flavors of Jewish Regional cooking are brought to life in this fascinating new cookbook. It features an enticing range of 120 recipes from Jewish communities all around the world.

Perfect Jewish is a delightful cookbook by Elizabeth Wolf-Cohen features both Ashkenazic and Sephardic dishes divided into 5 sections:

  • Soups, aalads & appetizers
  • Main dishes
  • Light dishes and accompaniments
  • Desserts, cakes & cookies
  • Breads & pastries
The featured recipes cover Central, Eastern Europe and Russia, Spain, Portugal, the Middle East and North Africa. The selections and the beautiful photos paint a rich picture of our culture adapting itself to the various regions around the world that were graced with a Jewish presence.
The easy to follow, detailed recipes, and the mouth watering photos make this a must have book for every kitchen. It was hard to choose just one recipe out the many succulent selections but I finally decided upon something uniquely American, so we adapted (the original deli recipe calls for Gruyere cheese) the following from the book:

Detail from photo on page 142...

The Reubens Sandwich

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp margarine softened
  • 4 slices “deli” rye bread
  • 4 – 6 oz cooked roast beef, or corned beef, or pastrami, [or a combination of any of these] thinly sliced
  • 1/3 cup sauerkraut, well drained
  • vegetable oil or margarine for frying
  • Pickled cucumbers to serve [yes, there is recipe for these on page 41, if you are truly ambitious!]
Thousand Island Dressing
  • 1 cup bottled or home made mayonnaise
  • 2 tbsp ketchup or chili sauce
  • 2 tbsp seeded and finely chopped green bell pepper
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped pimento
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped sweet and sour pickled cucumber
Following the great emigration of the 1880s, by the 1920s more than 2 million Jews were working in sweatshops. They bought kosher foods from Jewish neighbors and a great Jewish-American institution, the Jewish deli, was born. It served some fantastic sandwiches.
  1. Dressing: Mix the dressing ingredients together in a bowl until well blended. Store, refrigerated, in an air tight container for up to one week.
  2. Spread margarine on to one side of each bread slice. Lay margarine- side down. Spread the center with 1 tbsp each of the dressing.
  3. Divide the roast beef between 2 bread slices tucking in the slices to fit. Divide the sauerkraut and make an even layer over the roast beef. Top with the remaining bread slices, margarine side out, and press firmly to compress the layers.
  4. Heat a non-stick skillet or ridged griddle pan over medium-high heat. Carefully slide the sandwiches into the pan. Press down on on the tops of the sandwiches. Cook for 3 minutes or until the undersides are crisp and golden.
  5. Carefully turn, press down again and cook for 2 minutes, or until golden and the beef is hot. Transfer to a cutting board Cut in half and serve with pickles.
Serves 2
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS
05
Apr
11

An Unusually Delicious Brisket


Growing up in Uruguay, brisket (pecho) was a staple at every major festive occasion in my parents’ home and my mother’s brisket was served at least once, usually twice, during the sedorim. Aah, my mother’s brisket filled the house with its aroma, I remember the anticipation with which I waited to have itagain and again… Over the years I tried to find different versions of this old favorite and found many succulent variations, but last night’s version served at Lévana’s cooking demo far outshines most! Here she adapted her famous brisket to Passover by changing her deservedly famous recipe. She used honey instead of the usual molasses and brandy instead of bourbon Lévana has graciously agreed to share her recipe, notice the unusual ingredients:

Brisket in Coffee Brandy Sauce

Ingredients

  • 2 large onions, sliced very thin
  • 1 brisket. 6 to 7 pounds, first cut. Rinsed and patted thoroughly dry
  • 3 tablespoons instant coffee powder, decaf OK, mixed with 2 cups warm water
  • 1/3 cup brandy
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • ¼ cup vinegar
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon ground pepper

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Scatter the onions in a pan just large enough to fit the meat.
  3. Place the brisket on top of the onions.
  4. Combine all remaining ingredients in a bowl, and pour the mixture evenly over the meat. Cover tightly with foil, and bake 2 hours.
  5. Turn the brisket over, and bake uncovered 1 more hour.
  6. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board and wait about 10 minutes before slicing.
  7. Meanwhile strain the cooking liquids into a small sauce pan, pressing hard on the solids (and discarding them), and reduce on a high flame to about 2 ½ cups. Let the brisket cool slightly.
  8. Slice thin against the grain. In places where the brisket is very long, cut across first before slicing. Pour the gravy on top.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy! I most certainly did and will again.

CS

27
Feb
11

Boerewors And Biltong


Boerewors is a South African sausage, the name is made up of two Afrikaans words: boer (farmer) and wors (sausage). Biltong, is a cured meat, also of South African origin. This past week I got to taste both, after I found them on an expatriate’s website. Joburg Kosher, makes them both and is certified Kosher Glatt by the OU

David Libesman, arrived in the US in 1989 from Johannesburg (“Joburg”). Unable to find either Boerewors or Biltong, with the taste and texture he was used to, he finally decided to make his own. With the recipes given him by his father, perfected over forty years as a butcher, he finally produced these delicacies. His family and friends loved them and Joburg Kosher Foods, LLC came to be.

Nice texture, very tasty

These Boerewors are marinated and seasoned, made from beef (including the edible casing!). The package includes four sausages, I grilled them in the oven and found them superbly delicious and very juicy. With a beer they were a perfect meal. I ordered their Traditional flavor, next time I’ll try the Peri-Peri and the Garlic flavors.

Next I tried their Black Pepper Biltong. Biltong‘s look is reminiscent of beef jerky; it is typically made from raw fillets of meat and unlike beef jerky it is never sweet, the seasoning also differs. Biltong is made up of two Dutch words: bil (rump) and tong (tongue).

Great as a snack, great in salads.

I had the Biltong by itself and liked it, I also tried it in a salad where it gave it a little kick that greatly enhanced the overall taste. I found both Joburg Kosher products very tasty and will order them again and again.

CS

04
Feb
11

More Superbowl Specials…


SYR and I spent such a wonderful evening last night with Sidney and Tammy Cohen at 18 Restaurant (240 E 81st St, New York NY10065; Tel: 212.517.2400). It was worth braving the cold and ice to have the opportunity to shmooze with them.  The restaurant was hopping with the evening crowd, who also ignored the weather to get a consistently great meal at 18. Tammi and her husband are so friendly and have such good business and food sense, it was great to see their restaurant thriving.

I had to have the Yemenite Meat Soup again, aside from the perfect weather conditions it’s just too good to pass up (this is winter comfort food at its best!). I’ve tasted this soup at a few well known establishments and I can assure you none came even close.

18‘s got a new sushi chef from NOBO.  I dont know what magic this guy puts int0 his sushi and sauces, but they were extraordinary. We  had his sushi roll and a  shredded fish salad, they tasted sensational. Considering that until 14 months ago I did not even touch anything remotely resembling a fish, you can believe this is very high praise!

If, unlike me, you are not into Indian food, 18 Restaurant is having their own Superbowl Special:

Colorful and delicious

  • 10 ASSORTED OVERSTUFFED DELI SANDWICHES
  • 10 ASSORTED SUSHI ROLLS
  • COLESLAW, PICKLES, POTATO SALAD
  • 30 ASSORTED MINI POTATO KNISHES, HOT DOGS IN BLANKET, MUSHROOMS IN PUFF DOUGH

$199

Now that they have their Liquor License,  18 Restaurant will – every motzey Shabbat (open from 8:00 pm to midnight) – give you a free glass of wine with dinner.

Warm and friendly

We raved about 18 Restaurant‘s food before, having revisited this eatery, we still rave about it. The sushi is superb, the soup is delicious and will warm your bones on any cold winter day, their hamburgers are in a class of their own. Why not give them a try? If this isn’t one of your favorite kosher restaurants already, it soon will be!

CS

30
Jan
11

Horseradish Crusted Standing Beef Roast


When I first moved to the US, as a teenager in 1962, I discovered that American Jews – except for Passover – only ate horseradish with gefilte fish. Back in Uruguay, where I lived prior to immigrating to these shores, we would have horseradish with meat at almost any time we ate meat (daily!). In America that suddenly wasn’t cool… Arguing with Americans on this was futile… ahh, the American Jewish palate seemed so uneducated at that time. Fast forward 49 years… and we caught up with the rest of the world, we adapted all their seemingly strange foods and often improved them. When I came across this recipe, by Laura Frankel, it brought back some great memories and I knew i’d have to try it tonight.

Detail of photo from: theheritagecook.com

Horseradish Crusted Standing Beef Roast

Serves 6-8

Something wonderful happens to horseradish when it is cooked. The pungent root vegetable so tearfully familiar during Pesach becomes sweet and savory once cooked and slathered all over gorgeous beef. The king of all meat cuts is a perfect celebratory gorgeous hunk of meat. It looks intimidating-but is actually really easy and can be done ahead of time and kept warm.

Ingredients

  • 1 4-rib roast (about 9 pounds), cut from the small end or first cut with the chine bone cut off (ask your butcher to tie the bones on to the roast)
  • 2 onions, coarsely chopped
  • 2 red peppers, coarsely chopped
  • 2 carrots, coarsely chopped
  • 3 plum tomatoes, cut in half
  • 4 tablespoons fresh cracked black pepper
  • 6 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 cup prepared white horseradish
  • 2 bulbs of garlic, roasted and the soft garlic squeezed out
  • 1 750 ml bottle dry red wine (I prefer Cabernet Sauvignon)

Directions

Preheat oven to 450 degrees

  1. Lay the rib roast, bone side down, in a large heavy duty roasting pan. Scatter the vegetables around the roast. These will be the base for wine sauce later.
  2. Season the roast with salt and fresh cracked pepper. Mix the horseradish and roasted garlic together.
  3. Generously smear the mixture over the rib roast. Place the prepared roast in the pre-heated oven and roast for 20 minutes. Lower the temperature of the oven to 325 and roast for an additional 60 minutes.
  4. Insert a meat thermometer into the the thickest part of the roast and when the temperature registers 115 (for rare-medium rare)-remove the roast. Loosely tent the meat with foil and allow to rest for 20 minutes. This will allow the final temperature to be around 125-130. The internal temperature will continue to rise in a process called carry-over cooking.
  5. Remove the meat and place the roasting pan over a burner at medium heat. Add the wine and gently scrape up any brown bits with a wooden spoon. Continue cooking until the wine has reduced by ½. Strain out the vegetables and discard. Adjust seasoning with salt and fresh cracked pepper.
  6. Remove the bones and slice the meat. Serve on a platter with wine sauce and sautéed mushrooms if desired.
  7. To hold the meat for Shabbat-once the meat has reached the desired temperature, turn off the oven and remove the meat as in step 4. After the meat has rested and any carry over cooking is finished-return the meat back to the warm oven-allow the door to stand slightly open and the meat will stay warm for another 30 minutes or more.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

09
Dec
10

Jack’s Gourmet – Part 2


What I like about Jack’s Gourmet sausages most, specifically and because of their superb taste, is the many dishes they can be used in. This past Tuesday I made a Sausage Pizza using both their Sweet Italian and the Hot Italian sausages and I used SYR‘s simple recipe.

SYR's Sausage Pizza, "delicious" hardly does it justice...

SYR’s Sausage Pizza

Ingredients

  • 9” pizza crust (I used a crust from Tradition, made with honey, with raised edges to avoid spillage)
  • Pizza Sauce (enough to fill the crust)
  • 1 cup shitake mushrooms, chopped (you may use any other kind of mushrooms as well)
  • 6 Pearl onions, chopped (little, sweet, Vidalia onions might even work better)
  • 1 elephant garlic clove, chopped
  • 2 cups fresh spinach, chopped
  • 1 cup fresh basil
  • 10 grape tomatoes, sliced (you may use any other kind, including sun-dried tomatoes)
  • 1 Jack’s Gourmet Sweet Italian sausage, sliced
  • 1 Jack’s Gourmet Hot Italian sausage, sliced
  • Oregano
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 450 F.
  2. Put crust in oven for 7 minutes to make it crisp.
  3. Take out crust and pour in pizza sauce, thin and evenly.
  4. Suatee the chopped mushrooms, onions, and garlic, lay them out on the sauce.
  5. Sautee the spinach and the basil, add on the sauce.
  6. Add the sausage slices, alternating each time between the Sweet Italian and the Hot Italian.
  7. Sprinkle the whole with the oregano. salt and pepper.
  8. Put in oven for 15-20 minutes or until sausage slices look slightly brown.

I washed it down with a glass of well chilled Bartenura Asti Spumante. Scrumptious and delightful pairing I would have enjoyed it tremendously even if I had ordered it in a restaurant!

As for tonight, I’ll be getting a little more adventurous by making this salad:

Radicchio, Mango and Pomegranate Salad with Sausage

Ingredients

  • 2 medium shallots, sliced 1/8 inch thick (about 1 cup)
  • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon NatraZyle Xylitol (you may use granulated sugar, if you wish)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed mango juice
  • 2 teaspoons whole-grain mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1pound radicchio and curly endives mixed, washed, dried, and torn into bite-size pieces
  • 1 cup cubed mango
  • 1/2 cup pomegranate seeds (from 1 small pomegranate)
  • 1 Jack’s Gourmet Boereworks sausage, sliced
  • 1 Jack’s Gourmet Mexican Style Chorizo sausage, sliced

Directions

  1. Prepare an ice water bath by filling a bowl halfway with ice and water; set aside. Bring a small saucepan of well-salted water to a boil over high heat. Add shallots and blanch until tender, about 30 seconds. Drain shallots and place in the ice water bath until cool. Drain and set aside.
  2. Combine vinegar, NatraZyle, and 1 teaspoon of the salt in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring until the Xylitol, or sugar, has dissolved. Pour the boiling liquid over the reserved shallots and pickle until the shallots are slightly wilted and have lost any sharp taste, about 5 minutes.
  3. Drain the shallots into a strainer set over a large, heatproof salad bowl, collecting any pickling liquid in the bowl; set the shallots aside.
  4. Whisk the mango juice, mustard, remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, and pepper into the pickling liquid. Slowly drizzle in the olive oil while whisking until the vinaigrette is emulsified. Taste and adjust the seasoning as needed.
  5. Heat the sausages in a sautee pan with a small amount of oil until golden brown on all sides, approximately 4-6 minutes.
  6. Add the sausage slices to the salad.
  7. Add the radicchio, curly endives and mango slices and toss well to combine. Top with pomegranate seeds, pickled shallots and serve.

The contrast between the mild Boereworks and hot Mexican Style Chorizo combined with the rest of the salad should be very interesting. I can’t wait!

CS

RELATED POSTS

Jack’s Gourmet – Part 1

Sausage Pizza (Kosher)

Radicchio, Mango and Pomegranate Salad With Sausage (Kosher)

06
Dec
10

Jack’s Gourmet – Part 1


Of the delicious products (new and old) I got to taste at this year’s Kosherfest, Jack’s Gourmet sausages rank among the best. With no fillers, no by-products and no artificial flavors their natural goodness makes them a superb choice for a cold winter eve… or any other occasion.

Jack’s Gourmet, the company is the brainchild of two partners. Chef Jack Silberstein and Dr. Alan Broner.

Chef Jack Silberstein, Dr. Alan Broner

Chef Jack graduated  from the Culinary Institute of America (America’s foremost culinary school) in Hyde Park, NY, in 2007. He worked as a private chef aboard a yacht and is a respected consultant with the meat industry. Dr. Broner is a dentist with a popular private practice as well as a professor of dentistry. Dr. Broner has a long time interest in cooking and fine cuisine having attended many courses and cooking demos both in Manhattan (many at the De Gustibus School School of Good Taste) and in Brooklyn. It was, in fact, at one such course given in Brooklyn (by Chef Jack) that the two partners met.

Noting the lack of anything resembling good tasting sausages in the kosher world, they set out to produce them. I can attest they’ve succeeded and deliciously so!!! Not only were they the most popular stop at Kosherfest 2010, but every time I stopped by by I saw most of the celebrity chefs standing in line waiting to get another bite.

Their sausages come in 5 varieties:

  • Mexican Style Chorizo
  • Boereworks (South African style)
  • Sweet Italian
  • Hot Italian
  • Cured Bratwurst

They also produce the best tasting, most aromatic, 1st Cut Pastrami and 1st Cut Corned Beef Brisket, I ever had.

Jack's Gourmet mouthwatering selections

I picked up all these selections last Thursday. After tasting the superb pastrami and corned beef I started that evening’s dinner with rolls made with corned beef, pastrami and bratwurst…

truly succulent!

On Shabbos, I used the Cured Bratwurst as one of the three types of meat (pastrami deckel and cheek were the other two) I put in cholent. The taste, the aroma, were incredibly enhanced. It was one of my most successful experiments and probably the best cholent I ever made.

Well, gentle reader, I guess I’ll have to come back and tell you about the rest of the flavors…

CS




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