Archive for the 'kosher cuisine' Category



17
Jan
11

For Your Superbowl Party…


If you are hosting a Superbowl Party, you can either have the wife or yourself slave away preparing a meal, or you can save the aggravation and get a great price on delicious Indian fare:

If you are already watching the games and are hosting a party, why not do so with minimum patchke, with delicious Indian cuisine and with maximum enjoyment?

03
Jan
11

This Week’s Upcoming Internet Radio Show


Elizabeth Bland, photo from her website (cheesemistress.com/)

Last Wednesday we had a very interesting discussion on cheese and kosher cheese in particular with Elizabeth Bland (we will soon post, on these very pages, a supermarket trip with Mrs. Bland where we will look at various kosher cheeses. Meanwhile you can hear an .mp3 file of our radio show here.

This coming Wednesday – January 5, 2011 – our guest will be Gill Marks. Gill recently published the Encyclopedia of Jewish Food. What are Gill Marks credentials? What qualifies him to talk or write about food? As his website states:

Gill Marks, at The James Beard Foundation. Photo from gilmarks.com

An author, rabbi, historian, chef, and social worker, Gil Marks is a leading authority on culinary subjects in general and Jewish cuisine in particular. Among his published books are Encyclopedia of Jewish Food (Wiley: 2010), James Beard Award-winning Olive Trees and Honey: A Treasury of Vegetarian Recipes from Jewish Communities Around the World (Wiley 2004), and James Beard Award finalist The World of Jewish Cooking (Simon & Schuster, 1996). Marks was included in the Jewish Forward’s annual “Forward 50,” a list of the fifty most influential Jewish-Americans in the year 2010. http://www.forward.com/forward-50/

A self-taught chef, Marks entertained at his New York City home, earning a reputation as a gourmet cook. He began moonlighting for several caterers before branching out on his own. Some of his early jobs involved baking 150 apple pies for a cooking spray promotion, an all-dessert bat mitzvah, and a health food wedding. In 1986, Marks combined his interests in food, history, Judaism, and writing to become founding editor of Kosher Gourmet magazine, a position he held for six years. After leaving Kosher Gourmet, Marks turned his attention to writing fiction and biblical research as well as continuing his work on culinary subjects. His efforts include two plays, Therapist, and, in collaboration with Stanley Allan Sherman, The Golem of Gavah. His other books are The World of Jewish Desserts (Simon & Schuster, September 2000) and The World of Jewish Entertaining (Simon & Schuster, 1998) and he was also among the international team of contributors to the prestigious Meals in Science and Practice: Interdisciplinary Research and Business Applications (Woodhead Publishing, 2009).

Marks has also written articles for numerous magazines; served as a guest lecturer at the Culinary Institute of America,HazonKosherfest, and Drisha Institute; acted as consultant for various companies and organizations; and given presentations throughout the world, including the 92nd Street Y, Macy’s DeGustibus Cooking SchoolThe Learning Annex, the Kislak Adult Center, and the Fresh Start Program at New York’s Rikers Island. Marks continues to write, research, lecture, and perform cooking demonstrations for groups across the country and make appearances on various television and radio programs.

When I first contacted Mr. Marks to arrange the radio interview I thought it would be a short call, instead I was totally fascinated listening to his stories and the call was rather a long one. He is a captivating repository of anecdotes and history, this upcoming show promises to be a very interesting one!

Please, listen in on Wednesday at 8:00pm on Jewish Radio Network. Click on the red “here” under the white “Radio,” then wait about 90 to 180 seconds for the application to start streaming.

CS

27
Dec
10

Last Week’s Broadcast and This Week’s Upcoming One


Last Thursday we had literally a last minute postponement by our scheduled guest. Rather than panic (mere minutes before taping!!) I had as guest the famed restaurateur (formerly of Lévana’s, in Manhattan; currently a partner at NoBo in Teaneck, NJ), kosher tour operator (partner at Presidential Tours),  Israel wine expert and all around nice guy, Sol Kirschenbaum. In spite of the fact I gave him no time to prepare, we had an interesting and fun show which you can listen to here.

Elizabeth Bland, Ph.D

This week we will be back to our to our regular spot on Wednesday at 8:00pm. Our guest will be Elizabeth Bland, who will discuss kosher cheeses from around the world. Who is Elizabeth Bland, whence her interest on cheese? As she explains on her own website:

 

My passion for cheese started in France where I first tasted raw millk. I continued my language studies and travels to Europe, and tried many cheeses along the way. I earned a Ph.D. in Romance Linguistics from the University of Texas at Austin and speak French, Italian, and German.

I abandoned academia and worked in the cheese department at Central Market in Austin, Texas, and taught cheese classes at UT Informal Classes. Along the way, I became enamored with wine as well, and incorporated the “fruit of the vine” into my tastings. For years I catered cheese/wine parties and led tastings for groups.

She has written extensively on the subject of cheese for such publications as Cheese Connoisseur, Deli BusinessMY FOODSERVICE NEWS, Metropolitan Restaurant Times and others.

Ms. Bland is informative, she presents her subject with passion and wit. Please, listen in on Wednesday at 8:00pm on Jewish Radio Network. Click on the red “here” under the white “Radio,” then wait about 90 to 180 seconds for the application to start streaming.

CS

21
Dec
10

Soups as Comfort Food – Part 3


There are myriad types of soups, while I never intended an exhaustive listing when we started this series, while I realize there are far more types than I’m ever likely to try, this series only deals with some of my favorites from among those I’ve tasted. In this, the final installment of the series we will again feature two soups.

We chose all these recipes both because of their taste and the ease of preparation.

Last evening, at a cooking demo by Chef Lévana Kirschenbaum, I tasted her incredibly flavorful and very simple to prepare…

Aduki Bean Burdock Soup

Ingredients

  • 12 cups water
  • 2 teaspoons turmeric
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 6 bay leaves, or 1 teaspoon ground bay leaf
  • 2 cups aduki beans
  • Salt to taste
  • 4 large cloves garlic
  • 1 large sweet potato, peeled and cut in large chunks
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and cut in large chunks
  • 1 celery root, peeled and cut in large chunks
  • 1 large parsnip, peeled and cut in large chunks
  • 1 large zucchini, cut in large chunks
  • 1 large red onion, quartered
  • 1 large piece burdock, peeled and cut in large chunks

Directions

  1. Bring all ingredients to boil in a wide heavy pot.
  2. Reduce to medium and cook covered for 1 hour.
  3. Cream the soup with an immersion blender.
  4. Adjust texture and seasonings.

If you do not have, if you cannot find burdock, you can substitute almost anything else. In spite of her recipe calling for burdock, Lévana – just to demonstrate the versatility of her recipe – used kale stalk instead

If you are like me you probably never heard of burdock before…What is burdock? For its culinary and medicinal properties look it up in the Wikipedia. Meanwhile, as the article says:

the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy wrote in his journal, in 1896, about a tiny shoot of burdock he saw in a ploughed field, “black from dust but still alive and red in the center … It makes me want to write. It asserts life to the end, and alone in the midst of the whole field, somehow or other had asserted it.”

For another of Chef Lévana’s superb soup recipes check out Quick Black Bean Chocolate Soup

To end this series I chose to adapt an Emeril Lagasse variation of the classic French Onion Soup on the Food Network :

Gratinee Lyonnaise (Lyon-style Onion Soup)

[adapted to conform with kashrus]

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 pounds yellow onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/3 cup cognac
  • 8 cupspareve soup stock
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme, tied into a bundle with kitchen string
  • 1/2 loaf French bread, cut into 1/2-inch thick slices
  • 1 pound Gruyere cheese, coarsely grated
  • 2 egg yolks (optional)
  • 1/2 cup Port wine (optional)
  • Finely chopped parsley, garnish

Directions

In a Dutch oven or other large, heavy pot, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook, stirring, until golden brown, 15 to 18 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and carefully add the cognac. Return the pan to the heat and cook until the alcohol has evaporated. Be careful as the cognac may ignite.

Add the soup stock and thyme sprigs and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook the soup for 45 minutes.

While the soup is simmering, toast the bread slices until light golden brown. Remove from the oven.

Preheat the broiler.

When the soup is ready, divide 1/2 of the toasted bread slices between 6 individual ovenproof serving bowls or crocks and top with 1/2 of the grated cheese. Ladle some of the soup among the bowls and top with the remaining toasts. Ladle the remaining soup among the bowls and top with the remaining cheese. Place the bowls on a baking sheet and place under the broiler until the cheese is melted, golden brown and bubbly, about 5 minutes. Remove from the oven.

Optional topping:

In a small bowl combine the egg yolks and Port and whisk to thoroughly combine. Pour some of the mixture evenly among the soup bowls, stirring in around the edges so that it is incorporated into the soup. (The heat of the soup will cook the egg yolk and this will thicken and enrich the soup.)

Garnish the top with chopped parsley and serve hot.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

RELATED POSTS

Soups as Comfort Food – Part 2

Soups as Comfort Food

17
Dec
10

Shakshuka


When I lived in Israel, I discovered the Sephardic cuisine. Growing up in Uruguay, I had occasional eaten over by some of my Sefaradi friends but never encountered most of the delicacies I found in the Holy Land. One of this discoveries was Shakshouka, therefore I felt compelled to scour the web in search of easy recipes for it.

What is Shakshouka, you ask? Wikipedia describes it as:

Photo from: Wikipedia

Shakshouka (Arabic: شكشوكة‎; Hebrew: שקשוקה‎) (also shakshukashaqshuqa) is a dish from Maghreb consisting of eggs cooked in a sauce of tomatoes, peppers, onions, and spices (often including cumin, turmeric, and chillies), and usually served with white bread.

[..] Shakshouka is now a staple of Tunisian, Algerian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Somali, and Yemeni cuisines, and is also popular in Israel, where it was introduced by Tunisian Jews.

And here is the Wikibooks recipe for Shakshouka:

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons of frying olive oil
  • One tablespoon of sweet paprika
  • 6 cloves of garlic finely chopped
  • One large sweet red pepper diced
  • One Chili pepper (red or green) diced
  • 6 ripe tomatoes diced
  • Ground fresh black pepper
  • Salt to taste
  • 6 eggs

Procedure

  1. On a high flame, heat the oil for about half a minute.
  2. Add the paprika and blend well.
  3. Add the garlic and peppers, and turn to low flame. Cook for about ten minutes – until the peppers have slightly softened.
  4. Add the tomatoes and spice it with salt and pepper and then blend it.
  5. Bring it to a boil, taste it and if necessary – add spices to get the taste refined.
  6. Makes six dents in the mixture. Into each dent put an egg yolk, and spread the egg whites around.
  7. Continue to cook on low until the egg whites have coagulated.
  8. Serve the Shakshouka with black bread and fresh parsley.

From the Spanish language blog: Absolut Marruecos, we bring you this authentic Morrocan recipe:

Photo by: Absolut Marruecos

shakshuka con huevos

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 grated onion
  • 7 ounces water
  • 36 ounces tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons rice
  • 1 tablespoon parsley
  • 1 tablespoon green pepper, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 5 eggs

Directions

  1. Sauté onion in very hot oil until just golden.
  2. In a pot add the water, tomatoes, let it boil for 5 minutes.
  3. In a separate pot cook the rice.
  4. Add the parsley, salt, pepper and green pepper.
  5. Carefully break the eggs one at a time and drop on the tomato pot.
  6. Cook for about 40 minutes on medium flame.

When Mia Cooks, adds an interesting variation:

Shakshuka

Ingredients

  • 1 small red onion, chopped
  • 2 tbsp chopped bell pepper
  • 4 to 5 large ripe tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 cup veg broth
  • 1/4 cup peas
  • 1/4 cup corn
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 tsp chilli powder
  • salt to taste
  • coriander/cilantro leaves
  • Vegetable oil

Actually, it’d be better if you boil the tomatoes and then peel and chop them. But I forgot….heck, ok, I was too lazy.

  1. In a pan, heat a tbsp of vegetable oil.
  2. Add the chopped onions and bell pepper and saute for a few minutes.
  3. Add the tomato paste, chopped tomatoes and veg broth.
  4. Add the peas and corn as well. Season with salt and chilli powder.
  5. Simmer and allow to cook till the corn and peas are cooked and there’s some liquid left.
  6. Break the eggs into the base.
  7. Break the yolks with a spoon, cover and simmer. If you like your eggs runny, remove it well under a minute. I don’t, so i let it cook for 2 minutes till it firmed up. Add chopped cilantro and serve with bread.

Enjoy gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

16
Dec
10

Cooking Pasta: Debunking the Myth


Part of coming of age and the endless struggle for self is the establishment and ascendance of individual truth, honing mind and temperament, discriminating fact from fancy, empirical evidence from legend and myth.

I thought I had arrived in so many ways and then reality hit me like a flung wet noodle against the wall of my existence. We’ll save for another venue all the charming folktales of my youth soberly and maturedly dispensed with. But there I was, sitting pretty on the comfy wine colored couch, reaching for a bleached white conch shell that sits atop a wicker woven basket poised for reminiscence, aside other brilliant priceless colored stones, crystals, odd shaped rocks and shells randomly picked for their momentary significance and tangible recall. As I held the conch to my ear, I heard the voice of my nine year old neighbor and friend – Batya – herself clearly establishing her own unique truth sets, say:

- You know, that’s not the sound of the ocean you’re hearing, that’s just the echo of the air in the shell.

- What??? That can’t possibly be true, I know it’s the ocean, the waves of the very ocean that the shell came from.

I was not going to let this cute but clearly misinformed enfant terrible wreck my personal objects de time machine recall. Of course, we did what sensible people  do in such circumstances, we checked Wikipedia online.

I shouldn’t have, I know it now….. there are certain life mysteries that are best left alone… but there it was, the total deflation of spirit and romance and everything that’s right with the world….”What you are actually hearing is the sound around you vibrating as an echo in the air within the shell.” Who the heck needed to hear that, to know that? Great! Take the technicolor out of my universe… Hey, absolute reality is not all it’s cracked up to be. I know a butterfly flitting it’s wings impacts the climate at  the opposite end of the globe, and I know with the ten percent of my brain operational part of my brain that yawning is contagious, chicken soup cures a cold and that the five second rule applies. So maybe being primordial isn’t such a bad thing… No such thing as fairy dust?!?!?!? P’shaaaaaawww! What a world, What a world!!!

So talking about cooking pasta. Here I was thinking I had reached maximum maturity when I learned that al dente is très chic, that the “if it sticks” rule really does work and that salt in boiling water is a good thing along with a few drops of oil, so that the pasta doesn’t stick. When I really pay attention, I even cover the pot after its come to a boil and let it stay on low simmer.

Anyway, here are a few things I’ve learned since. Feel free to write in and further debunk my myths.

  1. Use a one to four ratio of water to pasta – four parts water to one part of pasta. Pasta needs room to cook.
  2. Add 1-2 tablespoons of salt for each gallon of water.
  3. Bring it to mighty bubbling boil, and then let it simmer for a minute or two till done.
  4. Don’t add oil… get this: oil makes the pasta slick and then all the wonderful sauces can’t adhere to it.
  5. Furthermore, after you drain the pasta, don’t rinse it. The starchiness too is a binder for whatever you will be adding to your pasta dish. The only exception is when you are making a cold pasta salad, then it is preferable to rinse the pasta first.

See? Some things are worth knowing after all. By the way, that gum I swallowed approaching the shiva house… seven years until it dissolves. Well what you can’t see can’t hurt you, right? Right?

Stir Fry Beef on Penne Pasta (adpated from 6ix Passions)

Ingredients

  • 1 lb penne pasta
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 red onion, cut into strips
  • 1 lb beef, cubed
  • 1 red pepper, cut into strips
  • 1 cup mushrooms, chopped
  • 8 broccoli florettes
  • Mango Salsa
  • 1/2 cup fresh basil
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Cook the penne pasta al dente (cooked through, tender, but still offering some resistance to the bite).
  2. Stir fry beef with Spanish red onion, mushrooms, red peppers and broccoli
  3. Toss on the pasta with mango salsa.
  4. Sprinkle with fresh parsley

Enjoy!

SYR

Stir-Fry Beef on Penne Past

15
Dec
10

Soups as Comfort Food – Part 2


Yesterday we posted the first part of our soup posts, but there so many great soups that it certainly merits a multi part series.

On 101 Cookbooks I found this great recipe adapted from The Essential New York Times Cookbook:

I had it last night... Mmmmmmmnnn! Photo from: 101 Cookbooks

Carrot and Fennel Soup

…it’s easy to make a meal of this by serving it topped with a poached egg. Alternately, you can make this soup vegan by omitting the Parmesan.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium fennel bulbs, trimmed fronds reserved, thinly sliced
  • 2 1/4 pounds / 36 ounces farmer market carrots, thickly sliced
  • 2 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 10 cups good-tasting vegetable broth or water
  • salt to taste
  • 3 cups / 12 oz cooked wild rice
  • 2 tablespoonsblood orange olive oil or 5 tablespoons fresh orange juice
  • lots of freshly grated Parmesan cheese (OPTIONAL)

Directions

  1. Heat the olive oil in your largest soup pot over medium-high heat.
  2. Add the fennel and cook for 3-4 minutes, until softened a bit.
  3. Stir in the carrots and cook another 10 minutes, just long enough for them to soften a touch and start taking on a bit of color.
  4. Stir in the garlic and cook another 30 seconds.
  5. Stir in the broth. Bring to a simmer and simmer, covered, until the carrots are very tender, another 15-20 minutes or so.
  6. Stir in the wild rice, bring back to a simmer, taste and add more salt if needed
  7. Remove from heat and stir in the blood orange olive oil or orange juice. Taste and add more if needed.
  8. (OPTIONAL) Serve dusted, generously, with freshly grated Parmesan, and a sprinkling of the reserved fennel fronds.

Serves about 6.

Inspired by the Carrot & Fennel Soup in The Essential New York Times Cookbook by Amanda Hesser.

Just remember, if you do use Parmesan Cheese YOU MUST wait 6 hours before you can eat any meat!

I like cream soups, especially if they include mushrooms, I found this delectable soup on the Better Recipes site and changed the butter to margarine and took out the whipping cream.

Photo from: Better Recipes

Creamy Leek Mushroom and Risotto Soup

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons margarine
  • 2 cups sliced leeks
  • 16 oz whole mushrooms, washed and cut into quarters, but not sliced
  • 1 package shiitake mushroom risotto mix
  • 30 oz chicken broth
  • 1 cup finely chopped tender roasted chicken
  • 1 sprig sage
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 2 cups whipped cream (Rich’s is what I use, but it needs to be whipped)
  • 3 tablespoon flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flake
  • Salt and cracked pepper to taste

Directions

  1. In a large soup pan or Dutch oven, saute leeks for 4 minutes over medium high heat.
  2. Add mushrooms and risotto rice, without the flavoring packet, then saute until leeks are almost tender, about 6 minutes.
  3. Pour in broth and add chicken and seasoning flavor packet.
  4. Reduce heat to medium. Tie together herbs and add to broth. Cover and simmer 20 minutes.
  5. Check occasionally and stir to make sure rice does not stick. Test the rice for tenderness. If not tender, cook another 3-4 minutes.
  6. Add the whipped cream and red pepper flakes, then heat through.
  7. Ladle 1 cup of broth into a medium bowl and whisk in flour until well blended.
  8. Gradually add mixture back to soup. Heat through, stirring frequently, until broth is creamy and thickened.
  9. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

RELATED POSTS

Soups as Comfort Food

14
Dec
10

Soups as Comfort Food


It’s winter, last evening we had our first snowfall of the year. It was not a heavy snow but it was followed by verrrry cold weather, is there a  better way to warm up than having some nice hot soup? Below is one of my favorites:

Creamy Potato Soup

Yields 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 8 medium potatoes, mashed
  • 1/4 cup margarine
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 6 cups soy milk
  • 2 teaspoons chicken bouillon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • Parsley and basil for garnish

Directions

  1. Peel, cube, boil, drain and mash.
  2. In separate pan, melt butter, add flour and cook while stirring for about a minute or so.
  3. Add half the milk and stir until lumps are out of flour mixture.
  4. Add remaining milk and on med-high heat, bring to a boil.
  5. Stir almost constantly or it will scorch.
  6. After boiling, turn heat off and add the mashed potatoes.
  7. Sprinkle some parsley and basil, serve.

Having scoured the web, we bring you a few easy to make recipes but are truly delicious.

At Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit I found the following recipe by Alisa Escanlar:

Vegetable Beef Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons cooking oil
  • 1/2 pound lean ground beef
  • 1 can (14 oz) whole tomatoes, broken up, with juice
  • 10 ounces frozen mixed vegetables
  • 1 cup onions, chopped
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon beef bouillon powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon thyme, ground

Directions

  1. Heat cooking oil over medium heat in large saucepan and add ground beef.
  2. Scramble fry until browned and crumbly.You can remove excess oil. Drain the hamburger and add back to pot.
  3. Add remaining ingredients and stir. Then, cover and simmer in medium to low heat.
  4. Simmer for about 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender but not too soft.
  5. Serve with crackers.

From South African cooking blog: KOEK! we bring you:

Photo by: Koek! blog

Pappa Al Pomodoro

Ingredients

  • 8.5 ounces olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 3 leeks, finely chopped
  • 34 ounces meat stock (made with beef and chicken)
  • 64 ounces puréed canned tomatoes
  • Half a loaf of bread, thickly sliced
  • Generous handful basil leaves, torn
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • Extra virgin olive oil to drizzle

Directions

  1. Warm the olive oil and garlic in a medium cooking pot. When the garlic has coloured slightly, add the leeks. Saute over a low heat for 20 minutes, adding water as necessary to keep the vegetables from turning brown.
  2. Stir in the stock and puréed tomatoes and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer gently for 20 minutes.
  3. Turn off the heat and add the bread, pushing it into the liquid with a wooden spoon. Stir in the torn basil leaves and season to taste with salt and pepper. Leave to rest for 30 minutes.
  4. Now whisk the soup energetically until it has a porridge-like consistency. Taste and adjust the seasoning.
  5. 5. Ladle into bowls, drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and serve.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

Vegetable Beef Soup

13
Dec
10

Cornish Hen Recipe


I always liked Cornish hens, since their small size usually provides about one portion of meat per hen, it’s easy to figure out how many to use for a family, or if you are entertaining. It usually weighs 2 pounds or less AND is almost all white meat because of its enlarged breast. I also find every excuse I can to cook with wine so today I’ll share my Cornish Hen recipe (my kids’ favorite, when they still lived at home at the time I’d use 7, instead of 2, hens).

Cornish hen, a miniature hen. Photo from: Wikipedia.com

CS’ Wine, Orange and Herb Cornish Hens

Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 Cornish hens

Marinade

  • 1 tbsp Italian seasoning
  • 3 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 Elephant garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1/2 cup of dry wine
  • Freshly squeezed juice of 1 large orange

Herbs

  • 1/4 cup fresh basil leaves
  • 1/4 cup fresh rosemary leaves
  • 1 small onion chopped
  • 2 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 small bunch fresh thyme
  • 1 tbsp kosher salt
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 1 tbsp fresh marjoram leaves
  • 1/4 stick margarine
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp sugar or Natrazyle Xylitol
  • 1 tsp red wine vinegar
  • Salt to taste

Directions

  1. Quarter the hens and place the pieces in a 9″ x 13″ baking tin
  2. In a blender combine all the marinade ingredients until thoroughly blended.
  3. Pour in over the hens, cover with plastic and marinade in fridge for 24 to 48 hours.
  4. After chicken has been marinated, combine the herb ingredients in a blender (or prepare ahead and store in a Ziploc bag) until thoroughly mixed.
  5. When done add salt to taste.
  6. Preheat oven to 450 F.
  7. Take marinated hens out and keep out of refrigerator for 15 to 20 minutes.
  8. Put hen pieces in a single layer (with the skin on top) in a roasting pan.
  9. Sprinkle herb mixture over the pieces
  10. Roast for 10 minutes
  11. Reduce heat to 350 F, and continue roasting for 15-20 minutes or until the juices run clear. Don’t forget to baste thoroughly at least a couple of times.
  12. Remove from oven, you may want to garnish pieces with fresh parsley leaves and serve.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

Wine, Orange and Herbs Cornish Hens (Kosher)

10
Dec
10

Chicken Tikka Masala


Chef Vijay Jagtiani has been an Executive Chef for over 26 years. He trained in India at the prestigious Bombay Catering College for 3 years and has worked all over the world in the finest Indian restaurants. He came to the United States in 1993 and quickly emerged as a chef known for getting the most out of a vast array of unique spices when developing his succulent sauces as well as a Tandoor oven guru. Chef Jagtiani was the executive chef at Jewel of India in NYC for many years and then took over the kitchen at the prestigious Shaan at Rockefeller Center. After opening up several successful non Kosher Indian restaurants on his own, Chef Jagtiani joined forces with the owners of Shalom Bombay to enter the world of Glatt Kosher Indian Cusine.

Chef Vijay has graciously shared this recipe with us:

Chicken Tikka Masala

Ingredients:
  • 5 Tablespoons Oil
  • 2 Medium Onions  (chopped)
  • 1 Tomato (chopped)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tablespoon Coriander Powder
  • 1 Tablespoon Red Chili Powder
  • 1 Tablespoon Paprika
  • 1 Tablespoon Fresh Ginger and Garlic paste (ground into a combined paste)
  • 1 Tablespoon of Egg Shade or Orange Color Food coloring
  • 3 boneless chicken breasts cubed
  • 3 Tablespoons of Non Dairy Creamer
  • 1 Cup Water

Directions

  1. Heat Oil in Large Skillet
  2. Sautee Onions until brown
  3. Add Tomato and simmer for 5 minutes
  4. Add Salt, coriander powder, red chile powder, paprika and garlic/ginger paste
  5. Simmer for 5 minutes
  6. Add 1 cup of water and food coloring
  7. Add Chicken pieces
  8. Cook for 10 minutes
  9. Add Non Dairy Creamer and cook for another 2-3 minutes

Serve with Basmati Rice
Yields 4 servings

Shalom Bombay has two locations:

Manhattan
344 Lexington Avenue – between 39th and 40th – New York, NY 10016; Tel: 212.922.0224 – Fax: 212.922.0124

Teaneck
166 Cedar Lane, Teaneck, NJ 07666; Tel: 201.357.8505

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

RELATED POSTS

Shalom Bombay

Chicken Tikka Masala (kosher)




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