Archive for the 'kosher cuisine' Category



18
Jul
11

A Cookbook For All Seasons


When I’m doing some serious cooking for a group of family or friends, with a limited amount of time to get the job done, I take a pass on my more fluff-and-glitz cookbooks and gravitate towards the ones that I can rely on to provide me with clear concise foolproof instructions, guaranteed reliable delicious results delivered with relative ease.

And that’s precisely what you can expect from Lévana Kirschenbaum’s new cookbook The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen – Glorious Meals Pure and Simple.

Though aesthetically the book’s layout is rather ordinary looking, the content is superb. It’s jam-packed with healthy mains, soups, salads, pastas, beads and desserts; aside from the general index, the cookbook includes a Passover index and a gluten-free index, with recipe notations indicating gluten free or gluten free adaptable. The recipes and text reflect a seasoned master chef who poured her culinary heart and soul into this cookbook. All content is meticulously organized and the format though visually lackluster nonetheless delivers the author’s usual witty humor and éclat in a most lively entertaining way.

Truly a hitchhiker’s guide to all things good-for-you and delicious, you’ll get never-ending use out of this comprehensive culinary work. The variations that accompany the recipes are awesome as are the tips and running commentary that weave through the pages. It’s like having a master chef or super balabusta mom right there with you preparing your best. Meir Pliskin’s photographs are tastefully done though the publisher’s cropping and cheap printing is somewhat disappointing. Lisa Young’s nutritional info though not revolutionary in content, serves as a useful reminder of healthy choices.

From the book, on page 171:

Roasted Vegetables GF P

Everyone likes a plate of grilled veggies, to eat as is or to use as a filling for sandwiches. I have chosen to share the most ridiculously simple way. First of all, my “grilled” vegies are roasted, requiring no turning over and no maintenance. Second, the trick is endives, radishes, brussel sprouts and fennel; but you will roast carrots, sweet potatoes, parsnips, potatoes separately because they have a longer cooking time. Roast beets all by themselves so they don’t bleed into your other veggies, or use the wonderful golden beets now available at all good produce stores. For all roasting, remember, one layer, no piling! Lining the baking sheet with foil reduces, or sometimes eliminates, cleaning.

When the vegetables are roasted, go ahead and get a little fancier, if you wish, toss in a little olive oil, chopped fresh basil, a few drops of balsamic vinegar and a little ground pepper. Most often I add nothing at all!

2 large zucchini, cut in sticks
2 large red onions, sliced thick
3 large red peppers, cut in large sections
1 large eggplant, cut in sticks
2 large portobello mushrooms, cups and stems separated, stems cut in half
Sea salt to taste

Preheat the oven to 450 F. Line a large cookie sheet (you might need 2) with foil. Spray heavily with vegetable spray. Place the vegetables snuggly and in one layer on the cookie sheet.

Spray heavily again with vegetable spray. Sprinkle with sea salt to taste. Bake for about 30 minutes, or until the vegetables look slightly charred. The mushrooms (or string beans or asparagus) might be ready first. Slice the mushrooms on a bias when they are cool enough to handle.

The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen cookbook is all about eating right without missing out on taste or style. The key is using healthy, wholesome, fresh ingredients combining flavors with such mastery your palate will think there is magic at play. It’s really the years of trial and error honing skills that have truly reached their apex of expertise. Lévana epitomizes her own quoting of Antoine de Saint Exupery’s words (at the bottom of page 17): “Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

Don’t miss this essential kitchen tool!

SYR

17
Jul
11

Events of the Week


Just because it’s summer and Brooklyn’s Jewish neighborhoods’ street are half empty doesn’t mean that New York has become a ghost town. Kosher events abound and our favorites for this coming week are:

Monday, July 18th at 7:00pm (Eastern Time)

Lévana’s Moroccan Feast Part 2: Salad Buffet

Please make certain to register to the demo, as the venue has moved to my apartment!

We grew up eating no end of salads at almost every meal: Is it any wonder we loved our veggies and ate them without any prompting? I am even including a dessert salad. True to form, we will bake an authentic Moroccan bread to go with the feast so we don’t leave a drop of sauce behind (this bread is the only item on the menu that will not be gluten-free).

I’ll be demonstrating:

  • Matbookha
  • Grated carrot salad
  • Roasted pepper salad
  • Spicy lettuce and chick pea salad with salmon
  • Tomato salad
  • Eggplant salad
  • Minted orange, endive and romaine salad
  • Moroccan Bread

Click Here to Register!

Registrations: A gentle reminder – Please register at least two days before any cooking class demo so A) We know for sure we have a demo going, and B) We have ample servings!

P.S. Throw in a C) – It makes my life easier :-) P.P.S. Throw in a D) I’ll give you a free signed copy of my new cookbook if you bring a new friend!

Also starting tomorrow you can take advantage of a great, reasonably priced menu at 18 Restaurant:

240 East 81st Street, New York – (212) 517-2400

THE KOSHER SCENE SPECIAL DINNER PRIX FIXE MENU

$32.00 per person, tax and gratuities not included. All wine, beer and alcohol billed separately.
Any item ordered, not on the Prefix will be billed separately

May not be used in conjunction with ANY other special

APPETIZER

Combination Platters:

Humus, Babaganuosh, Turkish Salad, Tahini

Mixed Green Salads

Assorted Breads

Photo by: seamlessweb.com

ENTREE

Eighteen Mixed Grill Kebob Special Combo Platter:

Chicken

Beef

Side Dishes: Choice of 2

grilled vegetables

french fries

mashed potatoes

basmati rice

DESSERT

Coffee/tea

Assorted Rugelach or Slice of Cake

Cold beverage (non alcohol) included

The food’s delicious, the price is very reasonable, the portions are generous, the ambiance is elegantly casual, a perfect eatery to take your wife, your date or the family. Go ahead, treat yourself! All of you deserve it. (For this Prix Fixe, please print out the following  .pdf)

18 Restaurant
240 East 81st. Street (map)
New York, NY
Telephone 212.517.2400
www.eighteenrestaurant.com

CS

08
Jul
11

Mamaliga, Mammelige!


I full well know that Jews were not the first to come up with this cornmeal dish, but among my earliest memories of my youth in Montevideo, Uruguay – from various relatives with Romanian spouses – was the aroma, the taste of Mamaliga (which some pronounced: mammelige)  I full well know that Mamaliga is not even a Yiddish name, yet there was also something very Jewish about the word, at least to my childhood mind, especially so, since my Italian friends’ mothers would call it polenta.

Elizabeth Wolf Cohen, in her Perfect Jewish, gives us the following recipe on page 154:

Romanian Mamaliga with Cheese

Serves 6 – 8
Cornmeal, made from maize  was introduced to Europe from the newly discovered Americas in the 16th century. Known as polenta in Italy, cornmeal became so popular in Romania that it was eaten as a porridge for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup fine yellow cornmeal or polenta
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 5 cups water
  • 4 tablespoons butter or pareve margarine
  • 1 cup cottage cheese, drained and strained

Mamaliga, mammelige... polenta?

Directions 
Put the cornmeal and salt into a medium bowl and stir in 1 cup of the cold water and smooth. Bring to a large pan filled with 4 cups of water to a boil over high heat. Gradually pour the the wet cornmeal into the boiling water stirring to prevent any lumps forming. 
Cook stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, over medium-low heat for 20-25 minutes, or until the cornmeal forms a mushy porridge and the water is absorbed.
Remove from the heat and stir in the butter and the strained cheese. Leave to stand for 1 minute. Stir and spoon into a serving bowl.
——)xoxox(——
Alternatively cook the cornmeal as above, reducing the water by 1 cup. Stir in only half the margarine and omit the cheese. Pour into a greased 9x5x3,5 inch loaf pan and leave to cool. Refrigerate, covered for 2 – 3 hours, or until firm and chilled.
Run a shar knife around the edges of the pan and unmold on to a cutting board. Cut into thin slices.
Heat the remaining butter in a large, heavy bottom skillet over medium-heat. Working in batches, add the cornmealslices and cook for 2 minutes, or until heated through  and crisp and golden. Carefully turn and cook for 1 minute more. Serve with roasted poultry or stew.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS
03
Jul
11

And the Runner Up Recipes Are…


We got quite a few interesting recipes and even some nice photos. On Monday past, we posted the winning recipe for our Shavous contest, now we are posting the next best ones.

2nd Runner Up

The following recipe shows that you can make something delicious even if it is easy to prepare…

Baked Blintz

(My daughter in Providence, RI, made this. It was easy to prepare and it was truly delicious! CS)

Ingredients

We usually “Healthify” it by substituting for ingredient in parenthesis. Tastes AMAZING either way.

FILLING:

  • 2 Eggs (or Egg Substitutes)
  • ½ Cup Sugar (or Splenda)
  • 1 lb Cream Cheese
  • 1 lb Cottage Cheese or Farmers Cheese

BATTER:

  • ½ cup Sugar (or Splenda)
  • 2 eggs (or Egg Substitutes)
  • 1 cup Flour (or Whole Wheat Flour)
  • ½ lb melted margarine or butter
  • Pinch Salt
  • 3 tsp Baking Powder
  • ¼ cup Milk
  • 1 tsp Vanilla
Directions
  1. Mix Filling – Set aside
  2. Mix Batter
  3. Pour ½ Batter into greased 9” X 13” pan (preferably glass)
  4. Spread Filling over batter
  5. Pour remaining Batter over Filling
  6. Bake 1 hour at 325

Submitted by Evan Rosenhouse LMSW, TX

—–)xOx(—–

1st Runner Up

Macaroni, Tuna and Cheese Casserole

Ingredients

  • 8 oz elbow macaroni
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 crushed garlic cloves
  • 4 oz mushrooms, sliced
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, sliced thinly
  • 7 oz can of tuna
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 3 teaspoons butter (and more for greasing)
  • 2 tablespoons all purpose flower
  • 1 cups of milk
  • 2 sliced tomatoes
  • 4 tablespoons bread crumbs
  • 1 cup grated cheddar
  • salt and pepper to taste

Photo sent in by: Giora Malinovsky

Directions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 F.
  2. Boil a large pan of slightly salted water. Add macaroni and return to boil. Cook for 8-10 minutes until macaroni is al dente. Drain, rinse, then drain thoroughly again.
  3. Heat olive in a skillet and cook the garlic, mushrooms and bell pepper until soft. Add the tuna and oregano, season with salt and pepper and heat through.
  4. Grease an 8 cup oven proof dish with a little butter. Add half the of the cooked macaroni, cover with tuna mixture, then add remaining macaroni.
  5. Melt butter in a pan, add the flour. Cook for 1 minute. Slowly add the milk and bring to a boil. Simmer for 2 minutes, stirring constantly until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  6. Pour the sauce over the macaroni. Add the sliced tomatoes on top of the sauce, sprinkle with the breadcrumbs and cheese. Cook in the preheated oven for 25 minutes.
Submitted by Giora Malinovsky, FL

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy… even if it is no longer Shavuos.

CS

RELATED POSTS

The Winning Recipe Is…

And the Winner is…

27
Jun
11

Internet Radio Broadcast and a Recipe


Last week we were plagued by some faulty equipment and technical problems during our live broadcast from Nargila Grill (1599 York Avenue – between 84 and 85th Streets on Manahattan’s Upper East Side). Today I did a makeup broadcast where I summarized what everyone said during the discussion we had on the Jewish cuisine, as a record of our history, dispersion and culture.

Our group consisted of Alessandra Rovati (dinnerinvenice.com), Geila Hocherman (kosherrevolution.com), Kim Amzallag (Kosher Inspired/Mishpacha Magazine) Levana Kirschenbaum (levanacooks.com), Marlene Mamiye (thejewishhostess.com) and Suzannah Raff (koshershopaholic.wordpress.com/)

Palov - Photo by: Kim Amzallag

After some mild and spicy salads, hummus, and more we were served palov – a Bukharian rice and beef dish. It was delicious but I couldn’t get the restaurant to share its recipe, so I was forced to go online to search for it. Here’s what I found on about.com:

Bukharian Rice – Plov

My 12-year-old son, who is by far our family’s pickiest eater, came home from his friend’s house singing praises about this amazing rice dish. The song went something like this, “It was the most delicious dinner I have ever eaten in my whole life!” Of course I immediately called Ilanit for the recipe. I was happy to discover he was talking about a rice, chicken, vegetable combination prepared in one pot. Without further ado, enjoy Ilanit’s Bukharian Rice recipe.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 3 onions, chopped
  • 6 carrots, grated thick
  • 5 Tablespoons oil (enough to cover bottom of pot)
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 2-3 pounds (1-1.5 kilo) boneless chicken breast, cut into small bite-size squares
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 1/2 cups rice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt rice
  • 3 1/2 cups boiling water (enough to cover the rice by 1/2 inch or 1 cm)

Preparation:

1. Heat oil in a pot. Add onions, and then carrots. Stir in the sugar. Cook until the onions are translucent.
2. Lay the chicken on top of the onions and carrots. Don’t stir in order to maintain a layer of vegetables and a distinct layer of meat. Sprinkle salt and pepper on the chicken. Cook the chicken, gently turning the pieces over in the middle, until the chicken turns white.
3. Add rice on top of the chicken. Don’t stir because the layers of vegetables and chicken should remain undisturbed, but distribute the rice evenly over the chicken. Sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Add boiling water. Turn the heat down to low and cover.
4. After about 15 minutes, scrap down the sides and poke a few holes through the rice to the bottom of the pot with the handle of a wooden spoon. Cover and cook for another 15-25 minutes, until the water has been absorbed and the rice is tender.
5. Serve in reverse order of the layers. Put the rice, then the chicken, then the vegetables onto the plates.Yields: 6-8 servings.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy. We did!
CS
29
May
11

Shavuos Recipes


The Shavuos Recipe Contest, which we announced on May 12th, has so far netted only 11 entries. Come now, gentle readers, we know there are some great cooks out there, please send us your favorite dairy recipes for a chance to win a nice selection of cholov Yisroel cheeses.

Meanwhile, having attended Lévana’s delicious Shavuos themed Dinner and a Show this past Monday, she graciously agreed to share two recipes:

Photo by: levanacooks.com

Cold Watercress Soup Recipe

Cold soups would always be a thrill if only they were made with full-bodied and full-flavored veggies, as they are here. No stock or broth whatsoever! Bouillon cubes? Let’s not even go there!

There are several variations you might enjoy on this theme, keeping as always a short and sweet ingredient selection: Broccoli, spinach, kale, asparagus instead of the watercress and zucchini; potatoes, turnips, parsnips, cauliflower instead of the celery root. Play with all the possibilities!

The immersion blender is a wonderfully nifty tool, inexpensive and portable (it will fit in a drawer), that allows you to blend your soup directly and in one shot right in your pot. No transferring, no mess. Just make sure there are no bones in the soup, or you will break your blade.

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 4 large leeks, sliced
  • 1 large celery knob, diced
  • 2 large zucchini, cut in large chunks
  • 2 teaspoons turmeric
  • 2 quarts (8 cups) water
  • 2 cups dry white wine
  • Salt to taste
  • 4 bunches watercress, stems and leaves
  • Good pinch nutmeg
  • 4 cups cold milk or non-dairy milk
  • Pepper to taste
Directions
  1. Heat the oil in a wide heavy pot. Add the leeks and sauté until translucent.
  2. Add the celery, zucchini, turmeric, water, wine and salt, and bring to a boil.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, covered, 30 minutes.
  4. Stir in the watercress and cook only a few seconds, until wilted. Turn off the flame.
  5. The remaining ingredients and cream the soup with an immersion blender. Adjust the texture and seasonings.
  6. Chill the soup.

As a kid growing up in Montevideo, Uruguay, I had to contend with two major handicaps:

  • The first neighborhood we lived in was mostly Italian and we were the only Jews in our building, the lone Jewboy was a natural target…
  • I was extremely overweight and couldn’t run too well, that much better for the nabe’s bullies.

My saintly mother (aleha Hasholom!) decided she’d become the best Italian cook in the neighborhood. Why? So that everyone would want to be invited over for a meal and thus, out of pure self interest, stop beating up the very fat Jewish kid… One of the favorites was polenta, here’s Lévana’s own version:

Polenta Casserole au Gratin Recipe

Please ignore those insipid cooked polenta rolls you find in the supermarket: Making the polenta base takes minutes, and is the bulk of the work for this delicious dish, which will serve a good dozen guests! Au Gratin just means it is topped with a crust: Yum!

This is only one of the wonderful polenta possiblities: You will love to explore them, as it is not only delicious but very nutritious, and gluten-free to boot. You can:

  • Eat the polenta as is, hot and un-assembled (in other words, only the first step of the recipe) as the grain for a main course.
  • Thin it with a little water, garlic and minced basil, maybe a couple diced tomatoes for a great soup
  • Cut the cooled polenta in cubes or triangles and put it right under your broiler flame
  • Make other fillings: Roasted diced vegetables (mushrooms, eggplant, red pepper, fennel, artichoke hearts, etc…..
  • Make it dairy-free. Cook it in water or dairy-free milk, and/or substitute some white wine for some of the water or milk.

Ingredients

  • 9 cups milk, low-fat OK
  • A few drops olive oil
  • Salt to taste (remember the cheese is salty, so very little please)
  • 3 cups coarse cornmeal
  • 2 cups freshly grated Parmesan or other strong cheese
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup basil leaves, packed
  • 1 large red onion
  • 2 tablespoons dried oregano
  • 5 cups canned crushed tomatoes
  • Good pinch dried pepper flakes
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Topping

  • 1 cup fresh bread crumbs, gluten-free OK
  • 3 tablespoons butter

Directions

  1. Boil water, oil, and salt in a large pot. Add the cornmeal and stir until thick. This should take about ten minutes.
  2. Stir in the cheese.
  3. Pour the mixture into a greased cookie sheet, in a layer no more than half an inch thick. You might fill one and a half cookie sheets. Let the polenta cool.
  4. Preheat oven to 425°F.
  5. While the polenta is cooling, make the sauce: in a food processor, coarsely grind the garlic, basil and onion. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the remaining sauce ingredients.
  6. Grease an 11-by-14-inch lasagna pan. Make one layer polenta, making sure you leave no blank spaces. Add half the sauce.
  7. Repeat: one layer polenta, one layer sauce. Bake the casserole for about 45 minutes, or until the dish looks bubbly and hot.
  8. Mix the bread crumbs with the butter, and sprinkle over the dish. Bake another 10 minutes.
  9. Let cool slightly before cutting into squares. Makes a dozen servings.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy AND don’t forget to send us your favorite Shavuos recipes (there is a nice selection of cholov Yisroel cheeses as the prize for the best!) to:

kosherscene@gmail.com

Meanwhile, check out Lévana’s pages for more Shavuos delicacies.

CS

RELATED POSTS

shavuos recipes – part 2 

————–

shavuos recipes – part 2

shavuos recipes – part 1

and for prize winning cheese cake recipes: and the winner is…

16
May
11

Roasted Peppers


For Shabbat and Sunday I was in Providence, RI, for a grandson’s bar mitzvah. My daughter, who invited mostly out of town guests, had me stay at my dear friend Irving Schild, photographer extraordinaire. I arrived mid morning on Friday and soon discovered that Irving not only excels in his chosen profession but he’s also a very good cook.

Among various side dishes he was preparing for Shabbat, as he was helping his wife, was one I always wanted to taste. Easy to make, superbly delicious, it was a dish of Roasted Peppers.

Roasted Peppers

Ingredients

  • 3 large red peppers
  • 5 garlic cloves, crushed
  • salt and pepper.
  • olive oil
Directions
  1. Place peppers on a cookie sheet. Put cookie sheet in broiler.
  2. Broil until the skin has blackened and blistered.
  3. Take out and let it coll until it can be easily handled.
  4. Pull of the stem, and peel the peepers.
  5. Cut into strips of desired size.
  6. Place in a bowl over crushed garlic. Add salt and pepper to taste
  7.  Add enough oil to lightly coat.
  8. Serve at room temperature.
You’ll find these are delicately flavored, they can be enjoyed by themselves – as I did – or as a side dish.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS
12
May
11

Date and Nut Bread


I had some dates from Israel and decided to use them in a recipe, I was intrigued by the following one from Elizabeth Wolfe-Cohen‘s Perfect Jewish 


Delicious!!!

Date & Nut Bread

Yields: 12 slices

Directions

  • 1 1/2 cups self rising flour, plus a little more for dusting
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 – 1 tsp ground ginger [SYR used 1 tsp]
  • 1 1/3 cups chopped dried dates [SYR did not use dried ones]
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda [baking soda]
  • 2/3 cup boiling water
  • 1 egg lightly beaten
  • 1 tsp butter or margarine, softened [SYR used margarine to keep it pareve]
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts, pecans or almonds [SYR used walnuts]
Directions
Preheat the oven to 325 F. Grease a 4″x8″ loaf pan. Line the base and and sides with nonstick baking parchment paper to come to 1″ above the sides. Grease again and dust with flour. Sift the flour, salt and ginger into a bowl.
Put the dates into a large bowl with bicarbonate of soda. Pour over the boiling water and leave to stand for 5 minutes.
Stir the egg and butter [or margarine if you prefer it pareve] and flour mixture into the date mixture and beat with a wooden spoon until well blended. Stir in the nuts. Pour the mixture into the loaf pan, smoothing the top. Tap the pan gently on a surface to expel any air bubbles.
Bake in the center of the oven for 1 hour or until set and well colored and the bread begins to pull away from the sides of the pan; a knife inserted in the center should come out clean.
Transfer to a wire rack to cool for 5 minutes , then leave to cool completely Using the paper as a guide, carefully remove the bread from the pan. If not serving the same day keep in the paper to prevent drying out.To serve, remove the paper from the base and sides, slice thinly.
Prep time: 20 minutes – Bake Time – 1 hour

The bread came out very aromatic, it tasted subtly sweet, we had it with some cholov Yisroel Mascarpone cheese made at Pomegranate Supermarket‘s kitchen and recommended by their resident cheese expert, none other than our good friend Elizabeth Bland. We washed it down with a Herzog Selection Chateneuf 2009, a white semi dry with a fresh, fruity bouquet. The bread was delicious, the Mascarpone just right, and the wine proved a perfect pairing!

CS

05
May
11

Bourbon Chicken


[Bourbon Chicken is a flavorful chicken dish named for the bourbon whiskey ingredient. The dish is commonly found at Cajun, Chinese, and American BBQ themed restaurants. The various recipes includes soy sauce, brown sugar, ginger, and bourbon in the base, and the chicken is marinated in this sauce.]

Yesterday we cooked with red wine, today we’ll use bourbon. This is a superb chicken recipe from Food.com!

Photo from Food.com, by: Caroline Cooks

Bourbon Chicken

Ingredients

  • olive oil
  • 4 chicken breasts, chopped into chunks
  • 1 red pepper, sliced thinly (about 200g)
  • 1 carrot, cut into sticks
  • 0.55 lbs. broccoli florets
  • 2 green onions, sliced thinly
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon ginger, grated
  • 1/2-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (add to your personal taste.)
  • 1/3 cup apple juice (just over a 1/4 cup)
  • 1/2 cup bourbon (when I use bourbon for cooking, just as when I use wine, I prefer a quality bourbon, something I would normally like to drink, like Blanton’s or Maker’s Mark)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon cornflour

Directions

  1. Heat a little oil in a pan, cook chicken in batches, until browned all over, set chicken to one side.
  2. Heat a little more oil in the same pan, add pepper, garlic and ginger, cook for 1-2 minutes, stirring.
  3. Add red pepper flakes, juice, bourbon, water, soy, sugar, ketchup and vinegar, stir to combine, bring to the boil.
  4. Return chicken to pan with carrot and broccoli, reduce heat and simmer for about 20 Min’s.
  5. Mix a little water with the cornflour, add to sauce and stir until mixture thickens.
  6. Serve over rive and sprinkle with green onions.

Yields 4 servings; Prep time – 10 minutes; Total time – 35 minutes


05
Apr
11

An Unusually Delicious Brisket


Growing up in Uruguay, brisket (pecho) was a staple at every major festive occasion in my parents’ home and my mother’s brisket was served at least once, usually twice, during the sedorim. Aah, my mother’s brisket filled the house with its aroma, I remember the anticipation with which I waited to have itagain and again… Over the years I tried to find different versions of this old favorite and found many succulent variations, but last night’s version served at Lévana’s cooking demo far outshines most! Here she adapted her famous brisket to Passover by changing her deservedly famous recipe. She used honey instead of the usual molasses and brandy instead of bourbon Lévana has graciously agreed to share her recipe, notice the unusual ingredients:

Brisket in Coffee Brandy Sauce

Ingredients

  • 2 large onions, sliced very thin
  • 1 brisket. 6 to 7 pounds, first cut. Rinsed and patted thoroughly dry
  • 3 tablespoons instant coffee powder, decaf OK, mixed with 2 cups warm water
  • 1/3 cup brandy
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • ¼ cup vinegar
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon ground pepper

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Scatter the onions in a pan just large enough to fit the meat.
  3. Place the brisket on top of the onions.
  4. Combine all remaining ingredients in a bowl, and pour the mixture evenly over the meat. Cover tightly with foil, and bake 2 hours.
  5. Turn the brisket over, and bake uncovered 1 more hour.
  6. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board and wait about 10 minutes before slicing.
  7. Meanwhile strain the cooking liquids into a small sauce pan, pressing hard on the solids (and discarding them), and reduce on a high flame to about 2 ½ cups. Let the brisket cool slightly.
  8. Slice thin against the grain. In places where the brisket is very long, cut across first before slicing. Pour the gravy on top.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy! I most certainly did and will again.

CS




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