Archive for the 'kosher cuisine' Category

23
Jul
13

Chicken Kabob with Vegetables


My laptop died on Tisha b’Av, when I got a new laptop the next day I found that my, 4 year old, USB wireless internet device was not Windows 8 compatible. UuuuGGGHHhhhhh!!!! Finally I’m back in business – the 4G device arrived – and I’m even getting used to Windows 8 (having used Windows since its very first incarnation, I hated the new one, but…). I promised you all, on the day prior to Rosh Chodesh Av, that I would share a recipe from the wonderful meal Irving Schild and his wife Regina treated me to, in their Pennsylvania lake cabin on July 4th, so here it is:

Irving’s Chicken Kabobs with Vegetables

All Photos: © Irving Schild, 2013

...on the grill

…on the grill

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly grounded pepper
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 package skinless, boneless chicken breasts
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 1 yellow, or orange, bell pepper.
  • 1 large Vidalia onion
  • 6 small mushrooms
  • 1 yellow zucchini
  • 5 cloves garlic, finely minced

Directions

Ready to eat!

Ready to eat!

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the olive oil, garlic, oregano, pepper and kosher salt.
  2. Cut the chicken breast into 1 1/2 inch cubes and add it to the bowl. Toss to coat evenly and let stand for at least 2 hours.
  3. While the chicken marinates, cut the onion and the bell peppers into 1-½ inches cubes and the zucchini into ¾ inch slices.
  4. Thread the chicken cubes and vegetables onto 5 to 6 skewers. Arrange the skewers on the rack of a gas grill and cook at medium heat, turning the skewers frequently and brushing occasionally with leftover marinade.
  5. Continue cooking until the chicken is brown and slightly burned outside. Remove from grill and serve immediately.

There were also spare ribs, grilled corn, steaks and grilled potatoes with melted margarine (just remembering the aromas and the flavors makes my mouth water again!). We washed it all down with Samuel AdamsCherry Wheat beer… A feast  to remember!

FIREWORKS-2013

The fireworks on the lake, sitting in the Schilds’ speedboat, were the best I’ve seen in a very long time.

Enjoy the grilling, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

02
Jul
13

Beef Curry


Spicy and delicious!

Beef Curry

BeefCurry

Serves 4

ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons corn oil
  • 4 onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 inch piece of fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 pound 7 ounces ground beef
  • 7 ounces canned chopped tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • salt

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a skillet. Add the onion, garlic and ginger and cook over low heat,  stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes and cook, stirring occasionally for an additional 3 minutes.
  2. Add the ground beef, increase the heat to medium and cook stirring frequently  and breaking it up with a wooden spoon, for 8 to 10 minutes until evenly browned. Stir in the tomatoes and season to taste with salt. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes. Uncover the pan and cook for an additional 5 minutes.
  3. Taste and adjust the seasoning, add salt as needed. Transfer the curry to a warmed serving dish; sprinkle with cilantro and serve.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

31
May
13

Rice Stuffed Tomatoes


One of my favorite summer appetizers, though I could make it at any time:

Rice Stuffed Tomatoes

RiceTomts

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 4 large tomatoes
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 cup Arborio rice
  • 6 fresh basil leaves, torn
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin oil, plus extra for oiling and drizzling
  • salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Cut a slice of the stalk end of each tomato and set aside to use as lids. Scoop the pulp out of the tomatoes and chop.
  2. Transfer to a large bowl, carefully so as to minimize any loss of tomato juices; add the garlic, rice and basil. Season with salt and pepper and stir in 1 tbsp of the oil. Cover and let stand – at room temperature – for one hour, for the rice to absorb the juices.
  3. Stuff the tomatoes with the rice mixture and transfer to an oiled baking pan. Top each tomato with the reserved lids and drizzle with remaining oil. Bake in a preheated 350 F. oven for 35 minutes, until the tomatoes are soft and the rice is cooked through. Serve warm or at room temperature.

If available (usually in gourmet fruit and vegetable stores, use Brandywine tomatoes which have a perfect balance of acidity and sweetness, for more sweetness use Spanish Montserrat tomatoes which have low acidity, but any large tomato will do. Arborio rice kernels are high in starch, shorter and fatter than any other short grown rice. They are great for risotto because the extra starch lends the dish a perfect creamy texture.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy

CS

27
May
13

Chicken Cutlets with Facon


I made this last evening, easy to prepare and a delight to the palate!

Chicken Cutlets and Facon

(based on a recipe from Food & Wine‘s Quick from Scratch Chicken Cookbook)

TurkeyFacon

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 lb Swiss chard, long stems removed, leaves chopped and washed well
  • 1 tbsp water
  • 1/4  lb sliced Jack’s Gourmet Facon, cut into 1/4″ strips
  • onion, chopped
  • 4 chicken cutlets
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp, fresh ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup parve substitute for sour cream *

Directions

  1. Put the Swiss chard and the water in a medium pot. In a large nonstick frying pan, cook the facon until crisp. Drain on paper towels. Pour off and reserve all but 1 tbsp of the facon fat, which should stay in the pan.
  2. Put the pan with the remaining facon fat on a moderately low heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, another 30 seconds. Add the mixture to the chard. Bring the water  to a simmer, cover and cook over low heat until the chard is wilted and tender, about 5 minutes.
  3. Meranwhile, heat 2 tbsp of the reserved facon fat in the frying pan over moderately low heat. Season the turkey cutlets with 1/4 tsp of the salt and the pepper. Cook until just done, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Remove the cutlets from the pan so as not overcook them.
  4. Remove the chard from the heat. Stir in the parve sour cream and the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt. Remove the chard from the pot with a slotted spoon, leaving the sauce. Divide the chard among four plates. Top each pile of chard with a turkey cutlet. Spoon some of the sauce over the top and sprinkle with the facon.
  5. Serve with french fries

* Parve Sour Cream

Yield: 2 cups

  • 1 package soft tofu
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • Salt, to taste

Blend together well and refrigerate for about 4 hours

I washed it down with a Blue Moon White Belgian Style Beer.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy; I certainly did!

CS

21
May
13

Mushrooms à la Grecque


Growing up I intensely disliked mushrooms but, like so many other things that changed, as I grew up, as my palate got more sophisticated, I learned to love them! So… what are mushrooms? They are…

…the fruiting bodies of soil-borne fungi that live from nutrients they take from plants living and dead. They flourish throughout the world’s temperate zones and add varying of earthiness and savory flavor to foods. Their flavor character and intensity depend almost entirely on the type of mushroom they are, rather than whether they are cultivated, what color they are, or their size.

(The Illustrated Cook’s Book of Ingredients – Page 270)

And… they are delicious, healthy and a great addition to salads, soups and more. Last evening I was not in the mood of long preparations, so… what better than this classic dish?

Mushrooms à la Grecque

GreekMushrms

Serves 1

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 2 large onions, sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 lb 3 oz crimini or button mushrooms, halved
  • 8 plum tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • 3 1/2 oz pitted black olives
  • 2 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • salt and pepper
  • chopped parsley, to garnish

Directions

  1. Heat 2 tbsp of the oil in a large frying pan, add the onions and garlic, and cook until soft and starting to brown. Add the mushrooms and tomatoes and cook, stirring gently, for about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
  2. transfer the mushroom mixture to a serving dish and garnish with the olives.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk the remaining oil into the vinegar, season to taste with salt and pepper and drizzle over the salad, Garnish with the copped parsley, cover and let it stand at room temperature for 30 minutes to allow the flavors to mingle before serving.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!!!

CS

04
Nov
12

Ratatouille Hash


From our friend Geila Hocherman (here and here)’s blog, Geila’s Kosher Revolution:

Photo by Antonis Achilleous

Ratatouille Hash

I was in a restaurant in beautiful St. Maarten when a waiter presented the table with a beautiful ratatouille served in timbales. It was delicious-and set me to thinking about adapting the usual ratatouille, a vegetable stew, to make it less stew-y. Here’s the result, a vibrant, fragrant, hash-every vegetable retains its distinctive texture as well as flavor-that makes a perfect meal served with chicken, fish or meat. You can serve it hot or at room temperature.

Serves 10 to 12
Convert It– To make this a dairy main dish, add a 10-ounce can of drained and rinsed chick peas and crumbled feta. Or, for a quick moussaka-like dish, toss the hash with ground, sauteed lamb.

Geila’s Tips – Check the bottom of the eggplants you buy. If the pip there is round, the plant is female, if long, male. Male eggplants have fewer seeds.

  • 3 pounds (about 2 medium) eggplant, cut into 1/2 inch cubes.
  • 4 tablespoons kosher salt, plus more
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 pound zucchini, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed or canola oil
  • 2 large onions, sliced thin
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 4 garlic cloves, put through a garlic press
  • 2 roasted red bell peppers * cut into 1/4 inch dice
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)
  • One 12-ounce can plum tomatoes with their juice
  • 3 tablespoons chopped basil
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Cover 2 medium cookie sheets with foil.
  2. Place the eggplant in a colander in the sink and roast with 2 tablespoons salt. Top with a plate and a weight, such as as a large can or wine bottle. Let the eggplant drain for 30 minutes rinse and dry it, and transfer to a cookie sheet. Drizzle over 3 tablespoons olive oil.
  3. Place the zucchini on the second cookie sheet, toss with 2 tablespoons salt and 3 tablespoons olive oil. Bake the zucchini and the eggplant until cooked through, about 20 minutes, stirring both after 10 minutes to prevent sticking. Set both aside.
  4. In a large skillet, heat the grapeseed oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, sprinkle with salt and saute, stirring, until translucent, 8 to 10 minutes. Push the onions to the side of the pan, add the tomato paste to the center, and cook until the the paste begins to bubble, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and saute the mixture until garlic is fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the bell peppers, stir, and add the vinegar, sugar, red pepper flakes, if using, and tomatoes with half their juice. and simmer until most of the liquid has evaporated, about 4 minutes. Add the eggplant, zucchini and basil, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer, stirring often, until the flavors have blended about 10 minutes. If the mixture seems too dry, add more of the tomato juice and simmer 4 to 5 minutes more. Adjest the seasoning, if necessary, transfer to plates, and serve.

–0o0o0–

* 2 roasted bell peppers

On a burner or under the broiler, roast the peppers until the skin is uniformly charred. Transfer to to a paper bag or a bowl. Close the bag or cover the bowl with foil, a dish towel or plastic wrap. Let the peppers steam until they become cool enough to handle. Remove the stems, peel, remove seeds and cut the peppers into 1 to 1 1/2 inch dice. Reserve any juice.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

28
Oct
12

Miso, Shiitake and Swiss Chard Soup


With winter fast approaching, with a predicted hurricane – a “frankenstorm” as the media refers to it – about to hit New York this very evening, it’s time to start thinking about comfort food. What better than a nice hot, hearty soup?

From Levana’s Table, by Lévana Kirschenbaum (page 48):

Miso, Shiitake and Swiss Chard Soup

Photo by: Ann Stratton, page 49

Makes 8 – 10 servings

Although the flavors are rich and complex, rthis soupis ready in about 15 minutes. Miso adds its intriguing fermented flavor and a bulky but not starchy texture to the broth. It is important to add the Swiss chard aat the very end of the cooking process., so that it retains its brilliant color. The corn adds a wonderful flavor.

2 quarts (8 cups) water
1 pound shiitake mushrooms, caps, thinly sliced
One 2-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and minced
1/2 cup dark or light miso paste
2 ears of corn, cobs cut into 1-inch rounds
3 – 4 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon bottled hot sauce
1 pound firm or extra_firm tofu, cut into sticks
1 bunch (1 pound) Swiss chard, leaves only, cut into ribbons
4 scallions, thinly sliced

Combine the water, mushrooms ginger, miso, and corn in a heavy pot  and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and add the soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, hot sauce, and tofu. Bring to a boil again. Add the Swiss chard and scallions and cook for one more minute, until the Swiss chard is wilted. Serve hot.

The elements may be raging outside, but this soup is certain to keep you warm.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

30
Apr
12

Red Grape Soup


There’s more to it than just vegetables, and/or noodles. Not only is soup good comfort food in the winter, not only can it warm a cold bodyon a freezing winter day, it can also cool us on a hot summer day. Pamela Reiss, in her Soup -A Kosher Collection gives us many delicious recipes of every kind, ranging from winter comfort types to refreshing summer ones.

Photo by Michelle Furbacher, page 190 Soup - A Kosher Collection

Here’s one I tried last evening, it was easy to make and absolutely delicious:

Red Grape Soup

Serves 5

This lovely, elegant chilled soup is wonderful as a starter. Taste one of the grapes before you cook them; if they are exceptionally sweet, you may want to hold off on adding the granulated sugar.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 lb red grapes
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup dry red wine

Directions

  1. Place all ingredients in a soup pot, cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer on low for 5 minutes, or until grape skins start to split.
  2. Purée the soup. (Use a blender, a hand blender, or a food processor to purée a soup. Do it in small and be very careful. Put a towel over the top of the food processor or blender to prevent any hot soup from spaying. If you are concerned about processing the hot liquid, allow the soup to cool beforehand.
  3. Pour the soup through a fine-mesh strainer to remove any seeds and skin, and transfer to a clean bowl. Chill the soup for for a minimum of 4 hours, or until it is completely cold.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

24
Feb
12

Egg Salad


I like egg salad, it is one of my favorite breakfast foods, and even part of a fast lunch.  When I came to these shores in 1962, I soon learned to enjoy it with mayonnaise as opposed to my mother’s spartan combination of chopped hard boiled eggs with small amounts of salt, pepper, and a bit of olive oil. Egg salad comes in many variations, but, David Lebovitz‘ recipe is superb:

Egg Salad

Enough for 2 or 3 sandwiches

My uncle once told me a funny story: about forty years ago, he once set out to make a recipe that called for capers and he thought that he would use fresh, rather than something from a jar. He looked and looked and looked and couldn’t find fresh. He could only find the pickled ones, which he later realized were how capers were prepared and sold. And now, every time I open a jar I think of his story. I like a little bit of chopped capers in my egg salad, or something a bit vinegary. You could also use some chopped cornichons or pickles – and their juice – in place of the capers.

You can use any kind of pepper powder that you want. Note that if you use a red one, it will turn the color of the egg salad a somewhat fiery shade of red.

6 hard-boiled eggs
1/3 (70g) cup mayonnaise
1 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon (drained) capers, chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons caper juice
3/4 teaspoon pepper, such as Isot (Urfa), black pepper or red pepper powder
sea salt
optional: 3 tablespoons sunflower seeds

  1. Peel the eggs and chop them into pieces.
  2. Mix the eggs in a bowl with the mayonnaise, mustard, capers, caper juice, pepper, and a good sprinkle salt. If desired, add the sunflower seeds.

To serve, spread on toasted grainy bread, then garnish with additional salt, pepper, and some chopped chives.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

21
Feb
12

Chicken With Wine & Tarragon


Those of you who’ve read this pages before know I am very partial to cooking with wine. When I came across this recipe in the 2009 edition Food & Wine: Quick From Scratch Chicken Cookbook, I knew I found an easy to prepare, delicious, dish which I slightly adapted to make it kosher:

Photo by: Melanie Acevedo, on page 86

Chicken with Wine & Tarragon

Yields: 4

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons dry wine
  • 2 teaspoons dry tarragon
  • 3 – 3 1/2 pound chicken quartered
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • salt
  • black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon margarine, cut into 4 pieces
  • 1/4 cup water

Directions

  1. Heat the oven to 375 F. In a small glass or stainless steel bowl, combine 2 tablespoons of the wine and 1/e teaspoon of the tarragon. Set aside
  2. Coat the chicken with the olive oil and arrange the pieces, skin-side up, in a large roasting pan. Sprinkle the chicken pieces with the remaining 1 tablespoon wine and season with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Top each piece of chicken with a piece of margarine.
  3. Cook the chicken for 15 minutes and then sprinkle the remaining 1 1/4 teaspoons tarragon. Baste the chicken and cook until the breasts are just done, about 20 minutes longer. Remove the breasts and cook the legs until done, about 5 minutes longer. Remove the roasting pan from the oven, return the breasts to the pan.
  4. Heat the broiler. Baste the chicken and then broil until the skin is golden brown, about 2 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a plate.
  5. Pour off the fat from the roasting pan. Set the pan over moderate heat and add the reserved wine and tarragon mixture and the water. Bring to a boil, scraping the bottom of the pan to dislodge any brown bits. Boil until reduced to approximately 3 tablespoons, about 3 minutes. Add any accumulated juices from the chicken and a pinch each of salt and pepper. Spoon the sauce over the chicken.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy! I plan to make it this evening and I know I will enjoy it.

CS




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