Archive for the 'kosher chefs' Category

18
Mar
14

A Conversation with Sara Black and Vicki Rothschild


Sara-Black1abcTomorrow evening (March 19th) at 9:30pm (Eastern Time) we will be talking to Chef extraordinaire Sara Black, on BlogTalkRadio.com. Ms. Black hails from Israel and has a business here as well in her native land. Later this week we will post 6 Passover recipes which I’ve had the privilege to film and taste at a private demo given by Chef Sara. I can assure you they were all incredibly delicious in spite of the fact they were very quick and easy to prepare.

Chef Sara runs a catering company – Asparagus Catering – and is also a Private Chef here in the US as well Israel. In the past she was Executive Chef at various Israeli hotels and restaurants, as well as restaurants in France and other parts of Europe. Ms. Black consults on restaurants and more, and is ready to share her expertise with our listeners tomorrow evening at 9:30pm (Eastern Time) on our BlogTalkRadio.com show. The broadcast was pre-taped on Sunday February 23rd at Chagall Bistro, in Brooklyn’s Park Slope area, at brunch time. The recording has some background noise but even so, it makes for an interesting and entertainting listen.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, please listen to our show with ancient Hebrew book and manuscript collector, dealer and personal buyer Hersh Eidlisz.

Don’t forget to tune us in tomorrow evening at 9:30pm (Eastern Time) we will be talking to Chef extraordinaire Sara Black, on BlogTalkRadio.com. We’ll be waiting for you!

 *** UPDATE ****

VickiThe Second part of tonight’s show, on BlogTalkRadio.com, will be a live interview with Vicki Rothschild, a Weight Management Counselor. Vicki managed to shed more than half her weight, eight years ago (after 20 years of struggle with Super Morbid Obesity) and tonight she will share her path to weight loss.

Her weight management program, includes:
* Unwavering support and guidance.
* Motivation, Inspiration and Insight.
* Accountability.
* An endless array of strategies and tips to get you through all situations and every obstacle you face.
* Learning new skills and behaviors to halt mindless & emotional eating.
* A satisfying, delicious plan that you will want to continue forever.
* Hundreds of scrumptious, satiating, recipes for Shabbos, Yom Tov or every day to wow you, your guests.

Don’t forget to tune us in this evening at 9:30pm (Eastern Time) we will be talking to Chef extraordinaire Sara Black, followed by successful Weight Management Counselor, Vicki Rothschild, on BlogTalkRadio.com.

CS

08
Jan
14

A Conversation with Chef David Kolotkin


This evening at 10:00pm (Eastern Time), we will be talking to Chef David Kolotkin, cookbook author (The Prime Grill Cookbook)  and Corporate Chef at Prime Hospitality Group. We will discuss what makes a Chef, coming up in the ranks of today’s brigade system kitchens and much more.

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DavKoll

Those of you who’ve been faithfully reading this blog, know that both SYR and I wrote many times about Chef David, you also know that because of his superior culinary skills, because of his people skills, his down to earth – friendly – personality, he is our favorite Chef among many great ones.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, listen to our last broadcast with Sotheby‘s Senior Vice PresidentJenifer Roth – on Israeli and International Art, and the fascinating world of antique Judaica with Consultant on Books and Manuscripts, David Wachtel

Please tune us in this evening at 10:00pm  (Eastern Time) for a fascinating show, pretaped at The Prime Grill Restaurant (25 W 56th St, New York, NY 10019 – 212.692.9292). We will be waiting for you!

CS

04
Nov
12

Ratatouille Hash


From our friend Geila Hocherman (here and here)’s blog, Geila’s Kosher Revolution:

Photo by Antonis Achilleous

Ratatouille Hash

I was in a restaurant in beautiful St. Maarten when a waiter presented the table with a beautiful ratatouille served in timbales. It was delicious-and set me to thinking about adapting the usual ratatouille, a vegetable stew, to make it less stew-y. Here’s the result, a vibrant, fragrant, hash-every vegetable retains its distinctive texture as well as flavor-that makes a perfect meal served with chicken, fish or meat. You can serve it hot or at room temperature.

Serves 10 to 12
Convert It– To make this a dairy main dish, add a 10-ounce can of drained and rinsed chick peas and crumbled feta. Or, for a quick moussaka-like dish, toss the hash with ground, sauteed lamb.

Geila’s Tips – Check the bottom of the eggplants you buy. If the pip there is round, the plant is female, if long, male. Male eggplants have fewer seeds.

  • 3 pounds (about 2 medium) eggplant, cut into 1/2 inch cubes.
  • 4 tablespoons kosher salt, plus more
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 pound zucchini, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed or canola oil
  • 2 large onions, sliced thin
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 4 garlic cloves, put through a garlic press
  • 2 roasted red bell peppers * cut into 1/4 inch dice
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)
  • One 12-ounce can plum tomatoes with their juice
  • 3 tablespoons chopped basil
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Cover 2 medium cookie sheets with foil.
  2. Place the eggplant in a colander in the sink and roast with 2 tablespoons salt. Top with a plate and a weight, such as as a large can or wine bottle. Let the eggplant drain for 30 minutes rinse and dry it, and transfer to a cookie sheet. Drizzle over 3 tablespoons olive oil.
  3. Place the zucchini on the second cookie sheet, toss with 2 tablespoons salt and 3 tablespoons olive oil. Bake the zucchini and the eggplant until cooked through, about 20 minutes, stirring both after 10 minutes to prevent sticking. Set both aside.
  4. In a large skillet, heat the grapeseed oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, sprinkle with salt and saute, stirring, until translucent, 8 to 10 minutes. Push the onions to the side of the pan, add the tomato paste to the center, and cook until the the paste begins to bubble, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and saute the mixture until garlic is fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the bell peppers, stir, and add the vinegar, sugar, red pepper flakes, if using, and tomatoes with half their juice. and simmer until most of the liquid has evaporated, about 4 minutes. Add the eggplant, zucchini and basil, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer, stirring often, until the flavors have blended about 10 minutes. If the mixture seems too dry, add more of the tomato juice and simmer 4 to 5 minutes more. Adjest the seasoning, if necessary, transfer to plates, and serve.

–0o0o0–

* 2 roasted bell peppers

On a burner or under the broiler, roast the peppers until the skin is uniformly charred. Transfer to to a paper bag or a bowl. Close the bag or cover the bowl with foil, a dish towel or plastic wrap. Let the peppers steam until they become cool enough to handle. Remove the stems, peel, remove seeds and cut the peppers into 1 to 1 1/2 inch dice. Reserve any juice.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

05
Jul
12

Prime Grill, Revisited


It never ceases to amaze me how you think you know someone and then you get to experience them under a new set of circumstances, which amplify strengths, or identify weaknesses you had never seen before.  Last Tuesday evening, it applied to our restaurant experience. Chef David Kolotkin (check here, as well) of Prime Grill – a culinary virtuoso in taste and presentation – was refreshingly unpretentious and warm as he personally treated CS and I to a side of Prime Grill we had heretofore not experienced.

It’s through no fault of Prime Grill (60 East 49th Street; New York, NY 10017; Telephone: 212.692.9292) that we had such tunnel vision, in fact it is because their steaks are so consistently fabulous that we gravitate with Pavlovian/Flinstone salivation straight to the beef every time we are there. Last Tuesday was different;  we broke from the habitual to the unexpected and in some cases extraordinary dishes on the menu.

We started with a platter of sushi and sashimi which included lean tuna, yellowtail, organic Irish salmon and Prime Grill roll- grilled yuzo-miso glazed black cod, cucumber, sesame-teriyaki sauce, topped w/tuna & avocado.

The quality and freshness of the fish was so good, it needed nothing more than the traditional ginger wasabi and soy sauce for accompaniment.

When it came to taste enhancing sauces sushi Chef Wibi did not disappoint us with his Yellowtail “Carpaccio” with yuzu ponzu and jalapeno, with togarashi – a citrus based sauce that greatly enhanced the yellowtail.

Now if you’ve been regular readers of our blog, you know that we are not from the big fish lovers and I was hoping they’d roll out the big side of beef soon that would set our four stone wheeled skin covered jeep off  kilter, and we were thrown off balance, astonishingly so by the House Smoked Wild Organic King Salmon and by all things a Maryland Style Fish Cake

The salmon circumferenced the poached egg on a crunchy toasted bottom that burst with noble flavors worthy of a king’s fare.

And the Maryland Style Fish Cake a whole grain mustard veloute, black bean & corn salsa- was sapid perfection; delicate, perfectly done! I almost didn’t want to share… fake crab? What’s happening to me?

The Atlantic Salmon Tartar with avocado capers and yucca chips was very tasty, a lovely mingling of flavors, though I would have preferred it served on a toasted or crunchy base.

Salad came next,  Bresaola Carpaccio, thin parchment like rectangles of cured beef filet served with arugula, roasted pepper, toasted pine nuts, shitake chips, crispy onions and a reduced port-wine drizzle. Superb!!! Ahh, the drizzle! That drizzle was especially good

We followed with the beef slider assortment was a mouthful of perfection. Each slider a world onto itself Kobe Beef with Pickled Chips & Ketchup, Moroccan Lamb with Arugula & Mint Yogurt, Brisket with Whole Grain Mustard Aioli, Buffalo Chicken with Fresh Herbs & Spicy BBQ Sauce and Black Angus with Mushrooms and Porcini Aioli. Woooow.

We segued with a Delmonico Steak; it came with tobacco onion rigns and a marrow bone.  CS was aching to remove the tiny fork and suck the bone dry, but… ettiquette prevailed.

Finally we got to the desserts, we started with the Tropical Vacherin

with mango/coconut sorbet, pineapple compote and salty macadamias macarons - my friends I’ve had macarons and I have had macarons, but the macadamia macarons served were in a class by themselves. How can a macaron be as light as air and so densely flavoured, at the same time?!? Only Solo‘s Chef Felenciana knows how!

We followed with their heavenly…

Chocolate Cake.

We finished this royal repast with a Honey and Rosemary Apple Galette…

with rosemary infused honey, savory dough and “butter” pecan ice cream. Delicate tasting, beautiful to look at, the plethora of flavors emanating from this dessert can satisfy just about everyone’s palate.

The Cappuccino was among the best I’ve tasted, a worthy crown to this superb and satisfying meal!

As you can tell by the pictures every dish was artfully presented, engaging all the senses.

During the meal we each had 2 glasses of wine. I sipped a Binyamina Bin Cabernet Sauvignon 2010, while CS had a Goose Bay Pinot Noir 2010.

My Cabernet Sauvignon opened in the glass to reveal black berries, wild berries and blackcurrant. Not a complex wine, but very easy and pleasant to drink. CS described the Pinot Noir, thus: Incredible flavors of black cherry and strawberry with buttery overtones. While neither of the two wines proved to be an ideal pairing, they nevertheless nicely complemented this feast.

Although we didn’t get to taste it, it was already late and we both bursting from all the food, CS could not resist photographing the first ever kosher caviar ever served at a restaurant…

All in all a meal we will long remember!

SYR

01
May
12

Tomorrow Evening’s Radio Show with Chef Alexandre Petard


Tomorrow evening, at 8:00pm (Eastern  Time) on The Kosher Scene Radio Show we will be talking with Chef Alexandre Petard from Ladino – Tapas Bar And Grill.

Chef Alexandre speaks to us about his training, his love of cooking, the various countries where he worked, the famous kosher and non kosher restaurants in New York whose kitchens he directed, and about the philosophy behind Ladino, his newest venture. Above all, you will hear more than you would expect from just a one dimensional chef. As he speaks with passion about his art, a whole portrait of the man behind the Chef’s jacket emerges.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, why not listen to our last broadcast? We spoke with Doris Schechter from My Most Favorite Food. Mrs. Schechter came to this country in a transport organized by the legendary Ruth Gruber when FDR, in an effort to court the Jewish vote, allowed 1000 Jewish refugees to come to this country and escape the ravages of WWII in Europe in 1944. Since then this Holocaust survivor, who arrived on these shores as a young girl, went on to become a successful restaurateur and cookbook author in NYC.

Please listen in tomorrow evening at 8:00pm (Eastern Time) for an interesting talk with Chef Alexandre Petard.

We’ll be wait’n for ya!

CS

11
Oct
11

Food and Sukkot


While there are no specific dishes associated with Sukkot, some lend themselves better to the sometimes chilly weather we are experiencing these days. The aromas, the warmth they evoke are just perfect for eating in the Sukkah. So, here is a superb recipe by one of New York’s favorite chefs, Jeff Nathan of Abigael’s on Broadway:

Photo by: Alison Nathan

Jeff Nathan’s
Tarragon Salmon Fillets with Vegetable Ragout

Dairy — Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided (2 tablespoons chilled)
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground fennel seed, optional
  • 5 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems discarded, caps sliced
  • 4 ounces sugar snap peas, trimmed
  • 1/2 pint grape tomatoes or halved cherry tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup Vegetable Broth
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh tarragon
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 4 7 to 8-ounce salmon fillets, skinned
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Position a broiler rack about 6 inches from the source of heat and preheat the broiler.
  2. To make the ragout, melt the butter with the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and fennel and cook, stirring often, until garlic gives off its aroma, about 1 minute. Add the shiitakes and cook, stirring occasionally, until they give off their juices, about 4 minutes. Stir in the sugar snap peas and cook for 1 minute. Add the tomatoes, broth, lemon juice, and tarragon. Bring the broth to a simmer. Cook, stirring often, until the tomatoes are heated through, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat, partially cover with a lid, and keep warm
  3. Meanwhile, brush the salmon on both sides with the oil, sprinkle with the tarragon, and season with salt and pepper. Oil the broiler rack. Broil the fish, skin sides up, for 3 minutes. Turn and continue broiling until the fish is opaque in the center with a tinge of rose color when prodded with the tip of a sharp knife, about 5 minutes more for medium-rare salmon. Place each salmon fillet on a dinner plate.
  4. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons chilled butter, cut into bits, to the vegetables. Stir with a wooden spoon, being careful not to break up the vegetables, to melt the butter. Season the ragout with salt and pepper. Spoon the ragout over the salmon and serve immediately.

Enjoy, gentle reader enjoy!

CS

22
Aug
11

Chef Haim Dadi – The Dream Concrete


Since he was very young, Haim Dadi knew what he wanted to do. His parents had a restaurant in Israel and whenever he visited their place – as a child – he loved the hustle and bustle, the aromas, the sounds of the patrons.  He is currently Chef/Partner of 18 Restaurant on 81st Street and 2nd Avenue. I’ve watched and followed him through every area of his restaurant and – as amiable as he is outside the cooking area – it is in the kitchen that he truly comes alive as he cooks, as he talks to his staff, as he experiments with more delicious ways of preparing his fare.

I spoke to Chef Haim recently to find out what makes him tick, what it is that spurs him on. Twenty five years ago he opened his first restaurant in Beersheva with his brother, serving mostly shawarma and a few other grilled items. Three years later, he arrived in New York and opened his first venture in Forest Hills – Tel Aviv Haktanah, though very successful he did not get along with his partner.

He left for a place in Manhattan called Shelanu, which eventually evolved into Mr. Broadway. It started out with a limited Israeli menu, yet considering the demographics in and around its location, it did not work too well. Over a period of seven years they slowly introduced various new types: deli, Chinese, shawarma and sushi. With the addition of all those cuisines Mr. Broadway, soon had one of the largest menus in Manhattan. With very moderate prices and the rich selection they expanded over the years and became a very successful venture, a fixture of the New York kosher Scene.

About a year ago, Chef Dadi was ready for bigger challenges. Together with Sidney Cohen he opened up 18 Restaurant on the premises of what used to be the high end Turquoise. In spite of the high quality of its servings, Turquoise had become a victim of the new recession.

Walking into 18, with its turquoise wall and aquarium, opposite an antiqued stone wall and red fixtures, gives the impression of an upscale expensive place. A quick look, however, at the menu immediately dispels the notion of “expensive.” The food served here is of higher quality than at his former place and in the year since they’ve opened they managed to gather a faithful following that fills the restaurant every day at lunch and dinner. The sushi is superb, and coming from someone who never touched fish until two years ago, someone who never thought he’d ever taste sushi, you can take it as very high praise indeed. I can never resist ordering Chef Haim’s Yemenite Meat Soup, or his juicy hamburgers. He doesn’t serve exotic dishes, instead he specializes in a wholesome array including Eastern European, Mediterranean, sushi and deli selections. He envisions 18 as a purveyor of high quality food at reasonable prices and… the concept works!

As a young child, Haim Dadi had a dream; as a man, he’s made the dream concrete!

CS

18
Jul
11

A Cookbook For All Seasons


When I’m doing some serious cooking for a group of family or friends, with a limited amount of time to get the job done, I take a pass on my more fluff-and-glitz cookbooks and gravitate towards the ones that I can rely on to provide me with clear concise foolproof instructions, guaranteed reliable delicious results delivered with relative ease.

And that’s precisely what you can expect from Lévana Kirschenbaum’s new cookbook The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen – Glorious Meals Pure and Simple.

Though aesthetically the book’s layout is rather ordinary looking, the content is superb. It’s jam-packed with healthy mains, soups, salads, pastas, beads and desserts; aside from the general index, the cookbook includes a Passover index and a gluten-free index, with recipe notations indicating gluten free or gluten free adaptable. The recipes and text reflect a seasoned master chef who poured her culinary heart and soul into this cookbook. All content is meticulously organized and the format though visually lackluster nonetheless delivers the author’s usual witty humor and éclat in a most lively entertaining way.

Truly a hitchhiker’s guide to all things good-for-you and delicious, you’ll get never-ending use out of this comprehensive culinary work. The variations that accompany the recipes are awesome as are the tips and running commentary that weave through the pages. It’s like having a master chef or super balabusta mom right there with you preparing your best. Meir Pliskin’s photographs are tastefully done though the publisher’s cropping and cheap printing is somewhat disappointing. Lisa Young’s nutritional info though not revolutionary in content, serves as a useful reminder of healthy choices.

From the book, on page 171:

Roasted Vegetables GF P

Everyone likes a plate of grilled veggies, to eat as is or to use as a filling for sandwiches. I have chosen to share the most ridiculously simple way. First of all, my “grilled” vegies are roasted, requiring no turning over and no maintenance. Second, the trick is endives, radishes, brussel sprouts and fennel; but you will roast carrots, sweet potatoes, parsnips, potatoes separately because they have a longer cooking time. Roast beets all by themselves so they don’t bleed into your other veggies, or use the wonderful golden beets now available at all good produce stores. For all roasting, remember, one layer, no piling! Lining the baking sheet with foil reduces, or sometimes eliminates, cleaning.

When the vegetables are roasted, go ahead and get a little fancier, if you wish, toss in a little olive oil, chopped fresh basil, a few drops of balsamic vinegar and a little ground pepper. Most often I add nothing at all!

2 large zucchini, cut in sticks
2 large red onions, sliced thick
3 large red peppers, cut in large sections
1 large eggplant, cut in sticks
2 large portobello mushrooms, cups and stems separated, stems cut in half
Sea salt to taste

Preheat the oven to 450 F. Line a large cookie sheet (you might need 2) with foil. Spray heavily with vegetable spray. Place the vegetables snuggly and in one layer on the cookie sheet.

Spray heavily again with vegetable spray. Sprinkle with sea salt to taste. Bake for about 30 minutes, or until the vegetables look slightly charred. The mushrooms (or string beans or asparagus) might be ready first. Slice the mushrooms on a bias when they are cool enough to handle.

The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen cookbook is all about eating right without missing out on taste or style. The key is using healthy, wholesome, fresh ingredients combining flavors with such mastery your palate will think there is magic at play. It’s really the years of trial and error honing skills that have truly reached their apex of expertise. Lévana epitomizes her own quoting of Antoine de Saint Exupery’s words (at the bottom of page 17): “Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

Don’t miss this essential kitchen tool!

SYR

25
May
11

Live! From 18…


This evening’s broadcast will be live from Manhattan’s 18 Restaurant (240 E 81st St, New York NY10065; Tel: 212.517.2400), starting at 7:30 – Eastern Time – we will be on the air until 8:30. Our guests include: Tammy Cohen from 18, Gil Marks – author of the Encyclopedia of Jewish Food, cooking guru and cookbook author extraordinaire Chef Levana Kirschenbaum, Kim Amzallag from Kosher Inspired Magazine and blogger Esti Berkowitz from Prime Time Parenting.

Whenever I go to 18 Restaurant, whatever else I may eat, I gotta have the Yemenite Meat Soup. Tasty and just spicy enough!

They have all been on our show before, except for Mrs. Berkowitz (who is a fascinating individual in her own right), but are back per listeners’ requests. What better venue than to have all of them together in one place, having a nice conversation, enjoying a meal and delighting you with their knowledge, humor and passion for all things food?

Won’t you join us, this evening at 7:30pm, at 18 Restaurant (240 E 81st St, New York NY10065; Tel: 212.517.2400) where you can meet our guests in person and partake of the restaurants delicious, yet reasonably priced fare?

Last Wednesday, we had the pleasure of hosting master photographer Irving Schild. He spoke to us about a fascinating new book project, he’s currently working on, about Jewish communities coming back to life in Eastern Europe, as well as some others prospering in more exotic parts of the globe. If you missed that show you can hear the archive here at: Talking with Irving Schild.

Even if you can’t come to the restaurant you can still hear us this evening from 7:30 to 8:30 pm on http://www.blogtalkradio.com/kosherscene. We’ll be wait’n for ya!

CS

10
Mar
11

Kaizen! Perfection at Prime Ko


Have you ever had one of those microcosmic moments in time encapsulating a window onto something so much bigger in its depth and substance? Though most of mine have not been food moments, this one surely was this past week at the Japanese inspired restaurant Prime Ko (217 West 85th Street New York, NY 10024-3901 – (212) 496-1888) when I tasted Chef Makoto Kameyama’s signature sushi Crispy Rice with Spicy Tuna appetizer. But more about that in a moment…

CS and I were escorted into the ground floor dining area; they’ve got a lower level with a wet bar, TV screen and more seating. Décor showed subtle Japanese influences. The waiting area had these lovely brown leather boxy ’kabuki’ shaped chairs and couch, fresh orchids on a dark rectangular table, with a wall of hand-painted coral peonies on soft aqua…

Wall dividers of slatted mahogany separated one area from another; windows were shaded with white bamboo semi-transparent treatments. Seating was brown textured suede on wood, a few striped suede backed benches, all tucked into square darkwood tables. Settings consisted of simple white geometric china, flatware laid out on deep red bamboo textured placemats, and chop-sticks resting on logo enhanced wood pieces. Lighting was recessed in one area and a framed oval shaped ruched red fabric with a back lit center aperture against the far wall, with a row of rice textured globe light fixtures in the other area.

A partial view...

Esteemed Chef Makoto Kameyama, the former prized Sushi Chef at Prime Grill for the past ten years, has served as Executive Chef at Prime Ko since it opened last year. His experience began in Tokyo where he assisted his father, a prominent Edo-sushi chef running a successful restaurant in Japan. In1981, Chef Kameyama came to the US and opened his own Japanese restaurant. Transitioning to Japanese kosher posed quite a challenge. Aside from the dietary restrictions on pork, shrimp, crustaceans, etc. sourcing fine quality kosher fish for sushi and sashimi, replacing basic Japanese cooking elements like bonita flakes and dashi (made of fish bone, until recently unavailable with a kosher certification), achieving consistent textures and creating exciting sauces were but a few of the obstacles he faced.

Chef Kameyama is very pleased with healthy low fat and low cal Japanese cuisine becoming staple of the American diet. Be it the DHA and heart healthy fresh fish, lung healthy miso, or vitamin mineral-rich seaweed, it is thanks to Japanese cuisine masters like Kameyama that this healthy streamlined fare is taking the nation by storm.

Now, back to our meal… The opening appetizer was an assortment of Rainbow Roll, yellowtail, tuna, and salmon sashimi and that fabulous Crispy Rice with Spicy Tuna I mentioned earlier. That was the defining moment of kaizen (Japanese for perfection) . The mouthful of toasted rice cake topped with spicy tuna pureed with bell pepper, topped with jalapeño and aioli sauce was a bite of pure perfection. The creative combination of textures and genius flavors conjoining to taste so remarkably well, spoke volumes about the artistry of a chef whose collective experience and expertise arrive at the table each time this signature dish is served. Bravo! Omedetou!

Sushi and Sashimi

But we were just getting warmed up… CS and I shared lovely grilled miso Chilean Sea Bass skewers in a spicy teriyake sauce served aside sautéed bok choy & veggies which couldn’t help but be outshined by an outstanding Tuna Delmonico, edged in breading served with jalapeño sauce, wasabi, beet and ginger sauce, with a side of soba noodles and pickled radish/onion/carrot garnish.

Tuna Delmonico

Our waiter, Al, our server, Lebron, treated us like royalty; they were friendly, efficient, informed. I thought we were getting the ‘special treatment’, but service to the tables nearby was just as extraordinary. Al, had the menu and wine pairings memorized down to the last nori seaweed bit & dot of sauce. Service was the epitome of high Japanese hospitality; water goblets refilled with Prime Ko’s own filtered carbonated water, napkins refolded, tables cleaned between courses, and soy sauce, dishes and silverware replaced with the arrival of each new dish.

We enjoyed a cleansing, refreshing Borgo Reale Pinot Grigio 2007 as we waited for our next course, a medley of kobe chopped beef dishes. We sampled Kobe Meatballs with ground ginger and garlic in miso sesame sauce, spicy Kobe Pizza - crispy dough, house made marinara topped with chopped salad & chopped wagyu. Wagyu Beef Sliders – a mini kobe hamburger with spicy aioli and teriyake sauce – completed this tasty Americanized trio.

Cutlery was replaced again with a fresh set including steak knives. I starved myself till dinner in anticipation, but this was turning out to be a most extravagant meal… The best was next! Three ounces of the most amazing Kobe/Wagyu steak resting on a slab of Himalayan salt rock witha side of white mushroom cooked at our table with a spritz of fresh lime. When quality is this good, extra spicing could only detract from it natural flavors – it was melt-in-your-mouth delicious.

Taken before being cooked at table-side. 3 ozs of marbled beauty!

The second steak dish was a 6 oz. Grain Fed Chateau-Briand with vegetable rice served with a jalapeño/uzu/teriyake sauce, with salad and rice. The steak was so good, I would have preferred the sauce on the side.

Steak Chateau-Briand

Chef then surprised us with Eggplant Dengaku. Baked eggplant topped with miso and sesame sauce. Unusual, and superbly tasty. The evening’s crown,  came with the creative and most beautiful desert dish pictured below.

Beautiful presentation, superlative tasting

Two crepes laid out like a Japanese fan, topped with blueberries and strawberries with hot chocolate sauce, sprinkled with green tea powder and confectioner’s sugar that looked like fairy dust. Need I say more?

A brilliant meal overall. Our thanks to Chef Kameyama and the staff of Prime Ko for a thoroughly enjoyable experience.

SYR

Prime Ko on Urbanspoon




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