Archive for the 'fish' Category

21
Oct
12

Flounder With a Crunch


Anyone who’s been following this blog over the last couple of years, knows that until three years ago I never tasted fish during the first 6 decades of my life, however, when I finally was trapped into tasting them… I found it a great culinary experience.  It showed me what I’ve been, unnecessarily, depriving myself of!

The following easy to make recipe appeared in a book published in 2004 by the Arie Crown Hebrew Day School in Skokie, IL. From Crowning Elegance, a cookbook that combines superb recipes with an elegant flair:

Flounder with a Crunch

Photo from: Crowning Elegance, page 210

Dairy or Parve — Serves 4

Crushed prestzels are a welcoming change from the basic breadcrumb topping. They add a nice cruch and a salty flvor, balancing the simplistic flavor of flounder.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound flounder fillets
  • 1 egg beaten
  • 3 tablespoons Dijon Mustard
  • 1 tablespoon milk or non-dairy creamer
  • 1/4 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1 cup coarsely crushed prestzels
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 lemon sliced, optional garnish

Directions

  1. In a shallow bowl, using a fork, combine egg, mustard, milk and pepper.
  2. on a large piece of plastic wrap separately place flour and pretzels .
  3. Coat fish with flour, dip fish into mustard mixture. Dredge fish in crushed pretzels to coat both sides well.
  4. In a large skillet, over medium high flame, heat oi. Cook fish in batches for 3 to 4 minuteson each side or until golden brownand fish flakes easily with a fork.
  5. Serve hot and garnish with lemon slices.

Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

25
Aug
11

Cioppino


This past Monday eve, SYR and I attended Lévana‘s Dinner and a Show: Light Italian Feast. As usual it was enjoyable, educational and absolutely DELICIOUS! Certainly one of the best cooking classes I’ve ever attended.

We especially liked the Cioppino and Lévana graciously allowed us to post her recipe:

Cioppino

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 4 ribs celery, peeled
  • 2 red peppers
  • 1 large onion, quartered
  • 1 fennel bulb, quartered, centers removed, sliced-thin
  • 3 leeks, darkest parts removed
  • 1 large can (28 oz.) crushed tomatoes
  • 2 cups dry white wine
  • 6 cups water
  • 6 bay leaves, or 1 teaspoon ground
  • 2 good pinches saffron
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 tablespoon anise and fennel seeds
  • Good pinch cloves
  • Good pinch red pepper flakes
  • 2 2-ounce can anchovies, drained and rinsed
  • 1 side salmon (about 3 pounds), cut in large cubes
  • 1 pound flaked mock crab
  • 1 large bunch flat parsley, minced

Directions

Heat the oil in a heavy wide bottom pot. In a food processor coarsely grind the garlic, celery, pepper and onion. Add the ground mixture to the pot, with the leeks, and sautè until translucent. Reduce to medium and cook for 30 minutes. Add the fish and parsley and cook just 5 more minutes. Ladle into soup bowls, and serve with good toasted bread or croutons.

Though it took me more 60 years to even taste fish, I can assure you (as does, SYR) that these was an incredibly tasty soup with a rich array of subtle flavors. Considering the ingredients… I can actually say…. it’s good for you, as well!

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

15
Aug
11

Salmon in Lemon Sauce


It’s hard to believe that until about 21 months ago I had never eaten fish, other than a small piece of gefilte on Friday evenings (and even then, none too willingly!). Having learned how to enjoy them, thanks to Orchideä and the defunct Avenue Plaza Dining (both in Boro Park), I now savor the taste and appreciate the nutritional value of that which for decades I’d considered untouchable, inedible, food.

Since, I’ve made this recipe a few times because it tastes great and it’s easy:

Salmon in Lemon Sauce

Ingredients

  • 4 tbsp. margarine
  • 1 lb. salmon filets
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 tsp tarragon
  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • 1 tsp. fresh chopped parsley
  • 1 pinch oregano
  • 3 oz. dry white wine
  • 2 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tsp. capers
  • 1 tbsp. cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup cream
  • 1/2 cup milk

Directions

  1. Melt 2 tbsp butter in a skillet. Lightly salt and pepper the fish. Cook the fish over medium-high heat for about 4 to 5 minutes on each side.
  2. Add the tarragon, garlic, parsley, oregano. When garlic browns add capers, white wine and lemon juice. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Remove fish from fire to a plate keeping it warm as you make the sauce. Melt the remaining butter in the same skillet. Whisk in the cornstarch; when smooth, add the cream and milk, whisking until smooth, cook until it thickens.
  4. Simmer for one minute, return the fish to the pan, and reheat for another minute. Top fish with sauce and serve with rice.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS
02
Aug
11

POM Wonderful!


I learned at a very tender age that “Have it, it’s good for you!” would inevitably refer to something that tasted very bad. Fast forward a couple of decades (OK, OK so it’s more than that, I confess, I confess!) and  I’m a fan of Pom Wonderful because  it’s actually “good for you,” delicious and refreshing.

Delicious, refreshing, good for you

Pomegranate juice has a great concentration of antioxidants, various studies say it is similar to red wine, purple grape juice and black tea. Preliminary research has shown that it may reduce the danger of various types of cancer, it may reduce serum cholesterol and protect arteries from clogging. In the summer I like it as an ice cold drink, but it is a very popular ingredient in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisine. It is also used as a marinade for grilled meats.

Since we are in the Nine Days and meat may not be eaten, I thought it appropriate to bring you a delicious fish recipe, which I adapted from Perfect Jewish, by Elizabeth Wolfe-Cohen, published by Parragon Books.

Photo from: Perfect Jewish, page 106. - Copyright by: Parragon Books, Ltd.

Stuffed Oven-Baked Trout with Pomegranates

Yields: 4 servings

  • 4 Whole trout, about 10 to 12 oz each, cleaned, scaled, rinsed and dried
  • vegetable oil for oiling
  • 2 tablespoons margarine
Stuffing
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup pistachios, shelled and skinned
  • 4 tablespoons chopped parsley or cilantro
  • 1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamon
  • 4 tablespoons POM Wonderful Pomegranate Juice
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 ripe pomegranate
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 F. Prepare the stuffing. heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a medium skillet over medium high fire. Add the onion and cook for 3 – 5 minutes, or until beginning to soften. Stir in the garlic and cook for an additional minute.
  2. Stir in the pistachios, cardamon, POM Wonderful and the remaining oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  3. With a sharp knife, slice off the top of the pomegranate. Cut the thick skin into 6 wedgesand pull apart into sections. Carefully scoop the seeds into a small bowl, removing the skin membranes and reserving any juice. Add about three quarters of the seeds to the stuffing and stir to combine.
  4. Oil a shallow baking dish large enough to hold the fish. Season fish to taste with salt and pepper, inside and out. Cut into the fish’ skin diagonally 2 to 3 times on each side. Spoon one quarter of the stuffing into each fish. Arrange in the dish.
  5. Drizzle with the melted margarine. Bake for 15 minutes, or until the flesh flakes when pierced with a tip of a knife. Transfer to a serving plate. Sprinkle with the remaing pomegranate seeds and juice.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

13
Mar
11

The Week’s Events


Monday, March 14

Photo by: ArtScroll

11:30 am

Location:

Pomegranate Supermarket (1507 Coney island Avenue – Corner of Avenue L – Tel: 718.951.7112)

Who:

Susie Fishbein

Subject:

Cooking Demonstration: Fish (last part of series)

  • Poached Salmon with Roasted Red Pepper Sauce
  • Tuna Teriyaki with Radish Salad
  • Green Tea Poached Cod

Free!

———-)xnOnx(———-

7:00 pm

Location:

210 West 101st Street, Apartment 9L (in Manhattan, between Amsterdam Avenue and Broadway)

Who:

Lévana Kirschenbaum

Subject:

Lévana’s Dinner and a Show

THE VEGETARIAN INDIAN FEAST GLUTEN-FREE – Lévana will demonstrate the following dishes:

  • Corn hot and sour soup
  • Aloo gobi
  • Vegetable pancakes in ghee
  • Jasmine rice
  • Apricot chutney
  • Yogurt raita
  • Mango lassi
  • Carrot nut pudding

The Demo runs from 7:00 to 9:00 followed by dinner, classes cost $45.00 for one session, $120.00 for 3 sessions or $200.00 for 5 sessions and a signed cookbook. Make your reservations at: http://www.levanacooks.com/kosher-cooking-classes/weekly-classes/

CS

08
Mar
11

Cafe Renaissance


Last week RN and I had an early dinner at Cafe Renaissance (802 Kings Highway, NY 11223-2240; Tel: 718.382.1900). We were prepared for a sumptuous, scrumptious meal but even so we were pleasantly surprised.

RN opted to begin her early dinner with Sauteed Artichoke in a very aromatic lemon-garlic sauce. Delectable, she said.

I started with a colorful Green Dragon Sushi Roll, it consisted of spicy salmon, cucumber, avocado, topped with spicy mayonnaise and crunch…

Green Dragon Roll

We both found it succulent; the spicy salmon gave it just enough of a bite, a great meal starter!

Next I had a Citrus Salad

Citrus Salad

It came with Romain lettuce, baby greens, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, walnuts, pomegranate seeds and pomelo strips. The blend of flavors of fresh fruit and vegetables combined to form a perfectly harmonious symphony of wholesome flavors.

RN opted for the Healthy Salad, with low glyceride pasta, sauteed spinach, broccoli, olive oil, garlic topped with Parmesan cheese.  She described it as perfectly cooked pasta, with a superb cheese topping.

We then shared a Greek Salad with feta cheese, olives and more. Again, like the earlier salads, this one did not disappoint.

Starting the mains, we shared a very tender St. Peter’s Fish…

St Peter's Fish

It came accompanied with red, yellow, and green peppers with a flower carved lemon. It was juicy, tender and neither tasted nor smelled fishy. Quite good!

We segued the above dish with a Grilled Salmon for RN and a Salmon Teriyake for me. Both were delicious and while the list so far should have been enough to satisfy the most ravenous creature, we were not done yet…

We finished the meal by sharing a Four Seasons Pizza

Four Seasons Pizza

Its eight slices infour sections consisted of Vodka & Cheese (my favorite!!), Mushroom, Roasted garlic and Cheese, Tomato Sauce, Black Olives and Pesto over Cheese, and Roasted Tomatoes, Broccoli and Cheese. As a pizza connoisseur, I am compelled to give this combination very high marks.

We washed the meal down with a Bartenura Pinot Grigio 2008. A well balanced dry white wine with tangy lemon/grapefruit aromas and flavors and a great aftertaste. All in all it was a very enjoyable meal, beautifully presented, but…

Considering the amount of dishes we consumed and pleasantly surprised as we were at the consistency of freshness, quality, and unsurpassed flavor I felt obligated to speak to Cafe Renaissance‘ owner, Shaul Ashkenazi. We wanted to know about his background and how he developed the successful philosophy behind this eatery.

Shaul started out in the business under his father, 40 years ago; the father owned and operated a very popular restaurant on Tel Aviv’s Rechov Sheinkin. Among the restaurants habitués were many prominent politicians (including Golda Meir) and financial bigwigs who often concluded many a political or financial deal at the restaurant’s tables. Later, in 1975, Mr. Ashkenazi opened up his own place in Ramat Gan (Gute Gute), next to the Stock and the Diamond Exchanges.

Eventually, after the death of his father, since all his siblings were already in the US, he too emigrated to these shores. Ten years ago he opened Cafe Renaissance, he sought only quality fresh ingredients and required each Chef do things his way. While most Executive Chefs get to decide on the menu, here only Shaul and his wife Tikvah make those decisions. Any item on the menu gets rigorously tested by the couple and honed to perfection before it is ever served to any restaurant patron.

Shaul’s son-in-law Ronnie manages the Ashkenazis second venture Cafe Venezia (1391 Coney Island Avenue Brooklyn, New York 11230; Tel: 718.258.5400). We’ll just have to try it!

CS

Cafe Renaissance on Urbanspoon

03
Mar
11

Cooking With Class — Susie Fishbein at Pomegranate Supermarket


Pomegranate Supermarket has been running a cooking demo series called Cooking with Class. Their guest Chef, this past Monday, was award winning cookbook author Susie Fishbein. In a friendly and entertaining manner, she demonstrated three fish dishes.

  • Miso Glazed Cod
  • Blackened Tilapia or Red Snapper
  • Sole en Papillote

Answering a question from the audience...

She explained how to ensure that the fish, whether filleted or whole, is absolutely fresh as that would guarantee a non fish smelling or fish tasting dish. After each dish was done (and all three were done in minutes!), samples were given out for the audience to savor. Those of you who have been following these pages for a while, know that I’m not a fish fan (until just over a year ago I’d always refused to get near a fish dish). On Monday,  like the rest of the audience, I savored these delicious finned creatures… because they neither smelled nor tasted fishy!

Now, get ready to taste it!

Of the dishes demonstrated, my favorite was the second one and Mrs. Fishbein graciously agreed to share the recipe.

Blackened Tilapia or Red Snapper

This dish is an authentic Cajun, mouth-on-fire delicacy. Blackened refers to the spices, not the lack of cooking prowess. If you are worried about the heat, only coat one side of the fish with the spice mixture, although it will still be hot. I like to make a batch of the spices and keep them in a baby food jar so that dinner preparation on this dish (it’s also great on thinly pounded chicken breast) is a snap. If you have a cast iron skillet, it is the way to go. If not, use a nonstick frying pan and get it very hot as well. Warn your guests, pour a big pitcher of ice water and enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons onion powder
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil leaves
  • 1 cup butter, melted
  • 4 (6 ozs) tilapia or red snapper fillets
  • 4 medium fresh tomatoes, each cut in half, trimmed tops so they seat flat
  • oregano
  • sour cream

Directions

  1. Spray a large frying pan or well-seasoned cast iron skillet with nonstick cooking spray. In a flat plate combine the onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne, white pepper, paprika, thyme, oregano and basil. Mix well.
  2. Dredge each fillet in the melted butter, then coat with the spice mixture in one or both sides. reserve the melted butter.
  3. If using a cast-iron skillet, get it very hot. If not, heat the frying pan over medium -high heat until very hot but not smoking.
  4. Carefully place the fillets in the skillet and sear about 3-5 minutes or until blackened. Pour 1 tablespoon of reserved melted butter on each fillet. Flip the fish over and pour 1 tablespoon of of melted butter over each fillet and blacken the other side, about 2-3 minutes. If you only spiced one side the second side won’t get black, just cook the fish through until it’s done. Remove fish to dinner plates.
  5. Brush the tomato halves with the melted butter and sprinkle with oregano. sear the tomatoes in the frying pan about 3 minutes or until soft. Flip the other side and cook 1-2 minutes longer.
  6. Serve each fillet with a big dollop of sour cream and two tomato halves.

Yield: 4 servings

The finished dish, as seen on one of the two giant TV screens

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

Mrs. Fishbein will be back at Pomegranate on Tuesday, March 8, to demonstrate how to cook Grouper and Mahi Mahi and again on Monday, March 14 to demo her techniques for Halibut. Can’t wait to learn from her!

CS

28
Feb
11

Events for the Week of February 27 Through March 5


Once again we have some great events. It all started last evening with Lipa‘s free concert at Pomegranate,

Monday, February 28th

Meet and Greet Susie Fishbein

Meet, Greet and Join Celebrity Chef, award winning cookbook author Susie Fishbein for a Cooking Demonstration Series at Pomegranate (1507 Coney Island Avenue – corner of Avenue L – Brooklyn, New York 11230; Tel: 718.951.7112). She will be demonstrating fish cooking techniques:

Cod

  • Miso Glazed Cod
  • Cod, Potatoes and Sun dried Tomatoes

Snapper

  • Blackened Red Snapper
  • Snapper in Parchment

The demo will start at 11:30am

Lévana’s Dinner and a Show

This week it will be held in Lévana’s house at: 210 West 101st Street, Apartment 9L (in Manhattan, between Amsterdam Avenue and Broadway). The subject of tonight’s class will be: THE LEAN LATIN FEAST. She will demonstrate the following:

  • Tilapia with green tomato sauce
  • Spicy pumpkin corn soup
  • Chicken breasts with chipotle sauce
  • Cabbage, cucumber and jicama salad with “yogurt” cilantro sauce
  • Café con leche pots de crème
  • Sangria

The Demo runs from 7:00 to 9:00 followed by dinner, classes cost $45.00 for one session, $120.00 for 3 sessions or $200.00 for 5 sessions and a signed cookbook. Make your reservations at: http://www.levanacooks.com/kosher-cooking-classes/weekly-classes/

13
Sep
10

Maple Roasted Pears and Sweet Potatoes and More


Susie Fishbein, best selling kosher cookbook author, graciously consented to share two of her recipes – from  her upcoming Kosher By Design – Teens and 20-Somethings – with our readers. I tried the first one last evening, after the fast, and loved it (and… I’m quite a few hours past my 20-somethings):

Maple Roasted Pears and Sweet Potatoes

DAIRY OR PARVE – YIELDS 6 SERVINGS

I adore these soft sweet pears and the way the sweet potatoes become sticky and sweet. You can try this with cubed butternut squash in addition to or in place of the sweet potatoes. While you have the maple syrup on hand, put the Pineapple Maple Glazed Salmon (page 134) on your menu for another night.

Ingredients

  • 8 mini pears, such as Seckel, or 4 ripe Anjou pears, peeled, halved, cored, quartered
  • 3 large sweet potatoes, (about 2 pounds) peeled, halved lengthwise, and cut into
    chunks the same size as the pears
  • 6 tablespoons butter or margarine
  • 1 cup pure maple syrup, NOT pancake syrup
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon coarse sea salt or kosher salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325˚F.
  2. For easy cleanup, completely cover a jelly roll pan with aluminum foil. Set aside.
  3. As you cut up the pears and sweet potato, place them into a large bowl. Set
    aside.
  4. In a medium pot, melt the butter or margarine over medium heat. Whisk in maple
    syrup and salt. Cook until it starts to bubble.
  5. Remove from heat. Pour over the pears and sweet potatoes. Toss to coat.
    Transfer to prepared pan
  6. Bake, uncovered, for 11⁄2 hours.
  7. Transfer to a serving bowl or platter.

…and one more, can’t wait to try it!

Pineapple Maple Glazed Salmon

PARVE – YIELDS 6 SERVINGS

Ingredients

  • 6 (6-ounce) salmon fillets, without skin, pin bones removed
  • 1⁄4 cup maple syrup (NOT pancake syrup)
  • 1⁄4 cup crushed pineapple, from a small can, squeezed dry
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 cloves fresh garlic, minced

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375˚F.
  2. Rinse the salmon and place it on a parchment-lined jelly roll pan. Pat dry with
    paper towels.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk the maple syrup, pineapple, soy sauce, mustard, olive
    oil, and garlic.
  4. Pour over the salmon and bake, uncovered, for 15 minutes.
  5. Transfer to serving platter. Drizzle with pan juices. Serve hot or at room
    temperature.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!!

CS

Maple Roasted Pears and Sweet Potatoes

07
Sep
10

“May it be Your Will…” – Symbolic Foods


It is customary to eat symbolic foods on Rosh Hashana, these symbols represent the individual’s requests for a better life for one self, for one’s family, etc… How did the custom begin?  The Talmud in Tractate Krisus states on page 6a: “Now that you say that an omen means something, each person should accustom himself to eat gourds, fenugreek, leeks, beets and dates…” As a result, we partake of these and other foods, all representing good things and the individual’s hopes for more and better. The foods mentioned are of types that grow fast and/or are very sweet.

Why do we eat them on Rosh Hashana, specifically, as opposed to any other time of the year? When we ask the Almighty to grant us something, just as when we would ask a king to give us something, we must invoke some merit or reason why we feel we deserve it. Therefore, these foods serve as a reminder that we must do tshuvah – repentance. Rosh Hashana being the time when the Almighty looks at the past year’s deeds and when we ask to be inscribed in the Book of Life, it is – of course – a time of self examination and repentance. Thus, these foods serve to remind us of our pressing need to repent, to resolve to be better and stronger Jews for the coming New Year.

These symbols blend in with the spirit of Rosh Hashana, as as Rabbi Yehuda Prero says on torah.org:

…If one looks over the prayers on Rosh HaShana, one will find that the basic theme is one of proclaiming the kingship and greatness of Hashem. Although Rosh HaShana is the day on which we are being judged, we do not make requests for sustenance, health, long life, etc.. We instead demonstrate how we have accepted Hashem as our king, and that we will listen to Him and follow His dictates.

By asking Hashem for our needs we obviously acknowledge Him as our King, upon whom we depend as the source of life, as the source of everything on this plane (and every other) plane of existence. The omens are a way of covertly asking the Boreh Olam – Creator of the Universe for our needs without being too blatant about it.

Immediately preceding each of these  foods we say a “Yehi ratzon – may it be Your will…” Each food, whether through a pun on its name, or through its very nature, alludes to our request.

A holiday plate with traditional symbolic foods

The Yehi ratzons are as follows:

“Yehi Ratzon Milfanecha, Ad-noi El-heinu Vei’l-hai Avosainu…”

“May it be Your will, Hashem our G-d and the G-d of our forefathers…”

For fenugreek (most Ashkenazim use carrots, in yiddish Mehren – which can also mean “to increase,”):

“…Sheiyirbu zechuyosainu.”

“…that our merits increase.”

For leek or cabbage:

“…Sheiyikarsu sonainu.”

“…that our enemies be decimated.”

For beets:

“…Sheiyistalku oyvainu.”

“…that our adversaries disappear”

For dates:

“…Sheyitamu sonainu.”

“…that our enemies be consumed.”

For gourd:

“…Sheyikora gzar dinainu vyikaru lefanecha zechuyosainu.”

“…that the decree of our sentance be torn up and may our merits be proclaimed before you.”

For the apple in the honey:

“…shetichadesh aleinu shana tova umtuka.”

“…that you renew us for a good and sweet year.”

For pomegranate:

“…shenirbeh zechuyos kerimon”

“…that our merits increase like (the seeds of) a pomegranate.”

For fish:

“…Shenifreh vnirbeh kedagim.”

“…that we be fruitful and multiply like fish.”

For the head of a fish or sheep:

“…Shenihiyeh lerosh velo lezanav.”

“…that we be as the head and not as the tail.”

There are also many personal symbols that some people add, for example among some of my relatives it’s long been customary to have a lettuce leave, half a raisin and a piece of celery stalk… What is the pun and its meaning? “May it be Your will, Hashem our G-d and the G-d of our forefathers, to let us have a raise in salary.

Do you have any personal or family symbols you add on Rosh Hashana? Please share them with the rest of us, we’d like to see them!

May this be the year, when everyone of us is granted all of his/her needs, as we acknowledge Hashem’s kingship!

CS




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