Archive for the 'dairy treats' Category

08
Jul
11

Mamaliga, Mammelige!


I full well know that Jews were not the first to come up with this cornmeal dish, but among my earliest memories of my youth in Montevideo, Uruguay – from various relatives with Romanian spouses – was the aroma, the taste of Mamaliga (which some pronounced: mammelige)  I full well know that Mamaliga is not even a Yiddish name, yet there was also something very Jewish about the word, at least to my childhood mind, especially so, since my Italian friends’ mothers would call it polenta.

Elizabeth Wolf Cohen, in her Perfect Jewish, gives us the following recipe on page 154:

Romanian Mamaliga with Cheese

Serves 6 – 8
Cornmeal, made from maize  was introduced to Europe from the newly discovered Americas in the 16th century. Known as polenta in Italy, cornmeal became so popular in Romania that it was eaten as a porridge for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup fine yellow cornmeal or polenta
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 5 cups water
  • 4 tablespoons butter or pareve margarine
  • 1 cup cottage cheese, drained and strained

Mamaliga, mammelige... polenta?

Directions 
Put the cornmeal and salt into a medium bowl and stir in 1 cup of the cold water and smooth. Bring to a large pan filled with 4 cups of water to a boil over high heat. Gradually pour the the wet cornmeal into the boiling water stirring to prevent any lumps forming. 
Cook stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, over medium-low heat for 20-25 minutes, or until the cornmeal forms a mushy porridge and the water is absorbed.
Remove from the heat and stir in the butter and the strained cheese. Leave to stand for 1 minute. Stir and spoon into a serving bowl.
——)xoxox(——
Alternatively cook the cornmeal as above, reducing the water by 1 cup. Stir in only half the margarine and omit the cheese. Pour into a greased 9x5x3,5 inch loaf pan and leave to cool. Refrigerate, covered for 2 – 3 hours, or until firm and chilled.
Run a shar knife around the edges of the pan and unmold on to a cutting board. Cut into thin slices.
Heat the remaining butter in a large, heavy bottom skillet over medium-heat. Working in batches, add the cornmealslices and cook for 2 minutes, or until heated through  and crisp and golden. Carefully turn and cook for 1 minute more. Serve with roasted poultry or stew.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS
19
May
11

Popbar


Located in the West Village, in an area full of restaurants (none of which are kosher, unfortunately), Popbar (5 Carmine Street – at 6th Avenue – New York, NY 10014; Tel: 212.255.4874) is a refreshing oasis for the kosher palate. When I say refreshing I mean it literally, especially, now that summer is almost here. They sell popGelato and popSorbetto… Unlike other gelati, their product comes on bars. Unlike other bars, theirs are made with all natural, healthy ingredients… not quite what you get at your friendly supermarket, is it?

An assortment of flavors and your choice of poppings (toppings) and dippings...

The popSorbetto flavors (strawberry, peach, mixed berry, blood orange, lemon, mandarin, pineapple, melon, grapefruit) are made with 70-80% real fruit, with no syrup, no milk and natural fructose, intead of sugar. As a result, not only are they healthier, but they do not taste overly sweet like so many other brands do.

The choice of popGelato flavors is a little larger (chocolate, vanilla, coffee, mint, coconut, hazelnut, giandula, pistachio, almond, banana). They use more milk than cream, as a result these bars have fewer calories and are lighter than regular ice cream.

They also just started producing a new popular item, yogurt strawberry.

All their ingredients are imported from Italy, and when you taste these bars you immediately notice the difference. I tasted a popGelato coffee which they customized for me by dipping it in hazelnuts and dark chocolate…

Decadently delicious!

Decadent, creamy but light, not overly sweet… a feast for the eyes and palate! Then I had a mixed berry popSorbetto. It is made from real strawberry, real raspberry and real blueberry. Not only is this just different from other sorbet bars, it’s faaar better tasting, certainly healthier.

Their poppings (toppings) include: almond, hazelnut, coconut, pistachio and chocolate sprinkles. Their dippings include: dark chocolate, milk chocolate and white chocolate.

Before leaving, I picked three flavors to take home: lemon and strawberry (half of it covered in dark chocolate) from the popSorbetto selections and Hazelnut (covered in milk chocolate and hazelnuts), a popGelato selection.

As you can see, I could not resist taking a bite out of the strawberry on the side dipped in chocolate, while CS was setting up to take a photo, and... I'M NOT ASHAMED OF IT!

CS - who loves lemon flavored anything – thought this bar was the best he ever had, while I found the strawberry tasty, juicy, delicious with a true strawberry taste, the dark chocolate dipping was just the right touch. I cut the hazelnut popGelato in half (weeeell, not exactly half), gave one piece to CS (guess which one!), we both thought it was superb, creamy, flavorful and just sweet enough. I guess Popbar will be seeing us a lot.

SYR

07
Dec
10

Matzel Toff


Everyone’s tasted chocolate covered matzah, right? Think again… unless you’ve had some Matzel Toff, you have no idea what matzah with chocolate is!

Woooow, what a treat!

Starting with a Streit’s matzah bar that gets covered with toffee and chocolate, this product is like nothing you ever imagined…

Looks scrumptious, tastes even better

The two bars did not last more than a few minutes. The milk chocolate covered variety that CS and I had came with a very generous covering of toffee and chocolate. The chocolate was obviously not of some cheap make but it showed all the rich taste you expect from a quality product.

Matzel Toff is a small CT based company, the brain child of Philip Guttman and Abigail Levy. Phillip, as a college student used to make his grandmother Edith’s delicacy (chocolate covered matzah), for a late snack, for parties, to share with good friends. When his friend Abigail tasted it she soon realized that if you add toffee, you take the flavor to a new level.

While it had never occurred to Phillip that this was a salable product, Ms. Levy convinced him to incorporate and start mass producing it. Between the two they invested $10,000 for research and development, the biggest challenge was the product’s shelf life, which they soon overcame. Then, armed with a Rolodex, they started making phone calls.

Currently it comes in four flavors:

  • Milk Chocolate
  • Dark Chocolate with Sea Salt
  • Pareve Chocolate (Kosher for Passover)
  • Milk Chocolate (Kosher for Passover)

In fact, Matzel Toff is so delicious that it’s included in Challah Connection’s Wine Gift Package.

Bartenura Moscato d'Asti; Recanati Cabernet Sauvignon; Mashuga Nuts (cinnamon spiced pecans); Seabear smoked salmon and Elsa's Story seasalt crackers; Meditalia green olive tapenade and creamy hummus;1 lb Bazzini pistachios; Koppers Petite Fruits candies; Matzel Toff; Chukars Cherry Quartet, 2-piece truffle set from Lake Champlain Chocolate.

We must try the Dark Chocolate with Sea Salt next…

SYR




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