Author Archive for Chaim Szmidt



21
Jan
14

Ribollita, Zuppa Toscana


It’s been snowing non-stop, since early morning. It’s CoOOolD out there!

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SnowStorm

Having come back from a long day I could think of nothing better to warm up with than one of my favorite Tuscan soups:

Ribollita

Rebollita

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 medium red onions, coarsely chopped
  • 3 carrots, sliced
  • 3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh thyme
  • water, as needed
  • 14 oz canned white beans, drained and rinsed
  • 14 oz canned chopped tomatoes
  • 2 1/2 cups vegetable stock *
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 lb 2 oz kale (preferably Tuscan kale**, if you can find it!), trimmed and sliced
  • 1 small day or two old ciabatta loaf (substitute any flat bread, if you can’t find the ciabatta, torn into small pieces)
  • salt and pepper
  • extra virgin oil, to serve

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan and cook the onions, carrots, and celery for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the garlic, thyme, salt and pepper to taste. Continue to cook for an additional 1 to 2 minutes, until the vegetables are golden and caramelized.
  2. Add the white beans to the pan and pour in the tomatoes. Add enough of water to cover the vegetables. Bring to a boil, and simmer for 20minutes. Add the parsley and Tuscan kale and cook for an additional 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in the bread and add a little more water, as needed. The soup should be thick.
  4. Taste and adjust the seasoning, if needed. Ladle into warmed serving bowls and serve hot, drizzled with extra virgin oil.

Try this soup and you’ll understand the true meaning of comfort food!

–oOOoOOo–

* Vegetable Stock

Yield: 8 1/2 cups

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons sunflower or corn oil
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped leek
  • 2/3 cup finely chopped carrots
  • 4 celery stalk, finely chopped
  • 3/4 cup finely chopped fennel
  • 1 small tomato, finely chopped
  • 10 cups water
  • 1 bouquet garni

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a large pan. Add the onion and leek and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally for 5 minutes, until softened. Add the remaining vegetables, cover and cook for 10 minutes. Add the water and bouquet garni, bring to a boil, and simmer for 20 minutes,
  2. Strain the stock into a bowl, let cool, cover and store in the refrigerator. use immediately or freeze in portions for up to 3 months.

–oOOoOOo–

**

Be warned, once you’ve tasted Tuscan kale, you’ll find it hard to go back to the more easily available variety.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

08
Jan
14

A Conversation with Chef David Kolotkin


This evening at 10:00pm (Eastern Time), we will be talking to Chef David Kolotkin, cookbook author (The Prime Grill Cookbook)  and Corporate Chef at Prime Hospitality Group. We will discuss what makes a Chef, coming up in the ranks of today’s brigade system kitchens and much more.

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DavKoll

Those of you who’ve been faithfully reading this blog, know that both SYR and I wrote many times about Chef David, you also know that because of his superior culinary skills, because of his people skills, his down to earth – friendly – personality, he is our favorite Chef among many great ones.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, listen to our last broadcast with Sotheby‘s Senior Vice PresidentJenifer Roth – on Israeli and International Art, and the fascinating world of antique Judaica with Consultant on Books and Manuscripts, David Wachtel

Please tune us in this evening at 10:00pm  (Eastern Time) for a fascinating show, pretaped at The Prime Grill Restaurant (25 W 56th St, New York, NY 10019 – 212.692.9292). We will be waiting for you!

CS

31
Dec
13

Pardes, Revisited


Art manifests itself in many forms. There are great composers whose compositions take the listeners to other realms as they touch their soul. There are great painters whose images evoke memories, longings, visions of delight, or just force one to think. There are great Chefs whose creations, though ephemeral by their very nature, leave us craving for more. And then there is Pardes‘ (497 Atlantic Avenue; Brooklyn, NY 11217 – Tel: 718.797.3880) Owner/Chef Moshe Wendel.

I don’t know if Chef Moshe ever jotted down a musical note, or even held a brush to a canvas, but his culinary skills are indisputable, his technique includes all the key elements of the high art crafts…  Chef Moshe‘s canvas is the serving plate, his colors, food; his creations demonstrate a thorough yet delicate understanding of the subtle nuances of the harmony and counterpoint of flavors…

Last evening SYR, her son YR and I, betook ourselves to Pardes. We started our repast with a selection of “little plates.”

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Kale Salad with crispy rice, watermelon, red herring, watermelon, radish and lime dressing.

Kale Salad with crispy rice, watermelon, red herring, watermelon, radish and lime dressing.

Lentil soup, black olive broth, poached egg, cherry pepper and croutons Pastrami rib, russian dressing, house kraut, pumpernickel crumb

Lentil Soup, black olive broth, poached egg, cherry pepper and croutons
Pastrami Rib, Russian dressing, house kraut, pumpernickel crumb

The Lentil Soup, came together as a carefully orchestrated gentle symphony of unusual flavor combinations culminating in a surprising citrusy grand finale. It left us speechless with delight. The Pastrami Rib brought back sweet memories of a long gone restaurant; nobody ever equaled Shmulke Bernstein‘s pastrami… until now. Yet, it was different, with a few more flavors. we loved it!

We followed, the above, with a Duck Breast, with Brussel sprouts, smoked chestnut, cranberry/cardamon juice and black radish puree. An interesting combination that continued this food concert with incredibly creative and delicious numbers. But, all came to a rousing crescendo as we dug into the Skirt Steak, with kohlrabi salad, pickle gazpacho, and kohlrabi crunch. Skirt steak is usually very salty, but not in this case, it showed an incredibly delicious ensemble of flavors.

We segued with a very juicy, very tender, melt in your mouth, 25oz Grow and Behold Rib Eye, in red wine sauce and superb fries.

Though bursting at the seams by now, we couldn’t resist the Chocolate Mousse, with potato crunch, roasted peanuts, raisin/almond milk puree, celery leaves, olive oil and sea beans. We washed it all down with a glass of Dalton Safsufa Vineyards Chardonnay/Viognier 2011 for SYR, and a Gaffel Kölsch beer for me.

Truly a night to remember! As SYR put it, we’ve done many top restaurants over the years, but none equaled this latest experience.

CS

25
Dec
13

Raffaello Pizza – Amore Italiano!


Rafaello (37 West 46th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue, NY, NY 10036 – Tel:212.575.6550), is set to revolutionize what we call kosher pizza, here in New York; the owner is Italian (and operates a famous restaurant in Rome), and so is the Chef. This past Sunday, I stopped by to see what the fuss was about, not only can I testify that everything I’d heard was true, but actually it all was an understatement. They offer 17 different types of pizza, including one gluten free, two different calzones, salads and three different types of pasta. But it is that pizza of theirs where they truly shine; as their website says:

The thin crust made with a dough left to rise for 2 days in order to minimize the amount of yeast and make it more digestible together with hand picked fresh ingredients makes it the perfect meal.

At Raffaello pizza slices are not triangular, they are rectangular and sizes are generous; the choices are as pleasant to the eye, as they are in aroma, as they are to the palate…

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Raffa1c

Slices of Eggplant Pizza and Black Olive with San Marzano Tomatoes and Mozarella… both types are mouth watering!

Raffa2

Cheese, pasta and black olives…

The calzones come freshly baked rather than rewarmed – as other establishments all too often do – filled with vegetables and oozing with melted cheese…

Raffa3

But I was in for a big delicious surprise at the end, at the recommendation of a couple next to my table I ordered the dessert pizza…

Raffa4

It didn’t look as elegant as the selections that preceded it, but the Chocolate Pizza with hot hazelnut spread and powdered sugar was better than I could ever have imagined, it certainly was a great way to end the meal. As a result of all the above, when I somehow found myself in the neighborhood at lunch time, yesterday, I just had to go back!

CS

17
Dec
13

Sotheby’s Upcoming Jewish Auctions – Part 2 – Israeli and International Art


Sotheby’s (1334 York Avenue; NY, NY 10021; Tel:212.606.7000), second Jewish themed auction which is also taking place today, features paintings, photographs, scuplture and DVDs. While much of the art is of a very Jewish nature one can easily recognize outside influences such as the French Fauves in the works of Mane-Katz, who is well represented here. It is obvious therefore that while weaving a Jewish theme, these artists often see it through the style of their contemporaries.

Can we therefore, talk about Jewish art as more than just the representation of certain subject matter? Absolutely! As I went through the exhibit it was quite obvious that Jewish painters, sculptors, photographers – while using the styles, the colors, the techniques, the equipment prevalent in their time – also bring a unique perspective, a unique sensitivity, a unique joy, a unique pain, all of them quintessentially Jewish.

It is outside the scope of this blog to discuss every single item, or even a significant number of them, but here are a few of the artworks that impressed me.

I found Samuel Bak‘s Untitled (Lot 69), very powerful…

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Ebak

Bak, a surrealist painter, is a Holocaust survivor with a powerful eye for detail – who portrays his personal nightmares and symbolism. The above Untitled work is subtitled (Experimente Mit der Weisheit – Experiment with Wisdom). Without showing an actually war scene, it portrays, the horrors, the aftermath of battle. Painted in 1974, it is estimated at $20,000 to $30,000. Four other works by this painter are included, as well, ranging between $12,000 to $20,000.

Moshe Gershuni is represented by two works, my personal favorite…

MGershuni2

…of the two, is the above monochromatic canvas (Lot 86), in shades of grey. Bold, strong, heavy brushstrokes create almost a sculpture on the canvas. It was painted in 2005-2006 and is estimated at $25,000 to $30,000.

Reuven Rubin also has a number of works here that show an evolution of styles and subjects…

ReuRub

Painted in 1928, The Milkman (Lot 27) depicts his love and amazement at the new land he had recently arrived in, Palestine. It has an estimated price ranging from $300,000 to $350,000. Two years later in 1930, Jakob Steinhardt in The Sunday Preacher (Lot 54), painted a powerful prophetic warning against the Weimar Republic’s decadence and the evil of things to come, it is estimated at $100,000 to $150,000.

Between the powerful photography of Adi Nes, to the very personal art (sculpture and DVDs) of Sigalit Landau, works by Ohad Meromi depict the anti-hero.

Omer1

The Psychedelic Protagonist (Lot 134), shows a despondent would be musician of undefinable age, reaching out – perhaps halfheartedly – for a hallucinogenic mushroom. Will he pick it up? Will he use it? This work is priced between $15,000 to $18,000.

From Ludwig Blum‘s idyllic View of Jerusalem (Lot 8), painted in 1937 and estimated at $40,000 to $60,000…

LudBlum

…to Yigal Ozery‘s study of a decaying building in Window (Lot 124), estimated at $12,000 to $15,000…

YigOz

From idealism, to warnings and fear, from hope to despair, from celebration to tears, the whole rainbow of human emotions, is represented here in many styles, in many colors. The range of Jewish experience, dreams and nightmares, laughter and tears, yet an absolute belief that future will be a bright one, from the late 19th century onward, is shown through varied media as explained by Jennifer Roth, two evenings ago, on our radio show.  There is something here for every taste and almost every pocket!

CS

16
Dec
13

Sotheby’s Upcoming Jewish Auctions – Part 1 – Important Judaica


Sotheby’s (1334 York Avenue; NY, NY 10021; Tel:212.606.7000) is having two exhibits on subjects of Jewish interest, prior to the auctions on Tuesday, the 17th of December. There are a hundred and sixty one lots in the Important Judaica exhibit, with one hundred and forty two lots in Israeli and International Art.

Many unusual items are shown in the Important Judaica section, including paintings, ceremonial art, books and more, ranging from antiquity to the 20th century in age. Quite a number of items impressed me, following is a small sampling…

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Hamisha Humshei Torah - Printed in 1561

Hamisha Humshei Torah – Printed in 1561

The above pictured item, Lot 136, includes the full Chumash together with RaSH”I and a condensed version of Elija Mizrahi‘s Sefer Mizrahi (a supercommentary on RaSH”I), titled Kitzur Mizrahi, as authored by Jacob Marcaria in Riva di Trento. Marcaria was a physician, printer and author. He printed a small number of titles in the press of German Rabbi Yosef Ottolengo – who had been licensed to print Hebrew books by Cardinal Cristoforo Madruzzo, Bishop of Trento. Included here are the Megillot (Scrolls) with commentaries by RaSH”I and Yitzchak Arama. It was obviously meant as a synagogue volume as it also includes the haftarot for the whole year as well as commentaries to aid in understanding these additional biblical readings. It is estimated to sell for $5,000 to $7,000.

Another book I found compelling was Sefatayim Yishak, Lot 143. In this slim volume are two letters written by Rabbi Jacob Yehoshua Falk – an ally of Rabbi Yaakov Emden – and Rabbi Aryeh Leib of Amsterdam – another staunch Emden ally and his brother-in-law. The letters, directed to the Rabbinical Court in Prague, expressed great concern and opposition to the newly appointed Rabbi of the German cities of Altona, Hamburg and Wandsbeck, Rabbi Yonathan Eybeschutz. Since Rabbi Eybeschutz‘ son and brother were known as Shabtai Tzvi followers, Rabbi Emden (whose father, the Chacham Tzvi, had been involved in a bitter fight against Nechemya Ochayon, after the latter was proven to be a full fledged Sabbatean) suspected Rabbi Eybeschutz‘ of secretly being a Sabbatean (especially after the latter gave a pregnant woman an amulet he wrote). This item is estimated at $10,000 to $12,000, it was printed in Altona in 1752.

More interesting books, among others, include Robert Estienne‘s Biblia Hebraica - in eight volumes – printed during a two and half year period from 1543 to 1546 (Lot 137), estimated at $20,000 to $30,000. An unusual collection of moral fables and animal stories, Meshal Ha-Kadmoni (Lot 134), by Yitzchak Ibn Shahula (and discussed by David Wachtel during last evening’s broadcast, on our radio show), has an estimated range of $30,000 to $40,000. It has some eighty woodcut illustrations and the material is based on the Talmud and Midrashim, with kabbalistic and Indian influences.

A very unusual tome, which appeared in Catania (Sicily), is a Compendium of Medical Treatises in Judeo-Arabic and Hebrew (Lot 96). While Arab copies of some of these works are relatively common, only three other copies in Hebrew letters are known. Jews lived in Catania as early as 383 B.C and many references to this town indicate, in later centuries, the presence of of numerous Jewish physicians. It’s price is expected to come in at around $8,000 to $12,000.

This medical book appeared around 1452

This medical book appeared around 1452

Another rare treasure is the first printed edition of the Talmud Yerushalmi by Daniel Bomberg (Lot 133). It took two years to print it (1522 to 1524), and was based on Yechiel ben Yekuthiel ben Benyamin Ha-Rofe‘s work from 1289, known as the Leyden Manuscript. It is expected to sell between $20,000 to $30,000.

Oppenhaim's the Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara - painted in 1862, four years after the tragic event.

Oppenhaim’s The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara – painted in 1862, four years after the tragic event.

Among the paintings in this auction, two stand out. Moritz Daniel Oppenheim‘s The Kidnapping of Egardo Mortara (Lot 60)*, depicts a horrible event from 1858 that drew international interest and world outrage against the Pope and the Catholic Church. This barbaric, unashamedly antisemitic act, was the catalyst that brought about the Resorgimento – the unification of Italy under King Vittorio Emmanuele and the erosion of Papal power over the country in 1870). It is estimated to bring in $200,000 to $300,000. Isidor Kaufman‘s Portrait of a Young Rabbi (Lot 61), is another very powerful painting, with estimates ranging from $100,000 to $150,000.

Painted circa 1897

Painted circa 1897

The two watercolors by Georg Emanuel Opitz (Lot 62) (not a Jewish artist, though many of his works show Jews), depict rather whimsically a Jewish teacher punishing one of his students as the other kids make fun of their mentor behind his back,  as explained by Jennifer Roth last evening on our radio show. The second watercolor shows a mother trying to intercede – on behalf of her daughter and her nervous suitor – with the father to accept the match. Both watercolors are expected to go for $8,000 to 12,000.

There are also many other items ranging from Torah finials, to crowns, to breastplates, to candelabra and more. All in all, this is a superb collection of items spanning hundreds of years and into the 20th century. Truly Important Judaica!

CS

* The white colored streaks in Oppenheim’s painting above do not show damage to the canvas, they are nothing more than reflections of the light in the exhibition hall.

15
Dec
13

Our Radio Show this Evening


This evening at 10:30pm (Eastern Time) on BlogTalkRadio.com we will broadcast a conversation we pre-taped on Friday morning at Sotheby’s offices in Manhattan. We spoke to Jennifer Roth (Senior Vice President, Sotheby’s New York) and David Wachtel (Consultant on Books and Manuscripts).

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David Wachtel

David Wachtel

First we spoke with Mr. Wachtel on the fascinating topic of old and rare Judaica books and scrolls from the Important Judaica exhibit. Jennifer Roth, joined us next as we discussed the paintings, sculpture and DVDs offered in both Important Judaica and Israeli and International Art.

Both auctions will be held this coming Tuesday the 17th of December, at Sotheby’s (1334 York Avenue; NY, NY 10021; Tel:212.606.7000)

Please join us at 10:30pm (Eastern Time) on BlogTalkRadio.com for fascinating insights into the world of rare Judaica and the place of Israeli and international Jewish artists in the context of modern art movements.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, please listen in to our conversation with Rabbi Asher Girshberg. Don’t forget to tune us in this evening at 10:30pm (Eastern Time) on BlogTalkRadio.com. We’ll be waiting for ya!

CS

11
Dec
13

The Prime Grill Cookbook


David Kolotkin, one of our favorite Chefs, has authored a new cookbook together with Prime Hospitality Co.’s CEO Joey Allaham. Some of Prime Grill‘s tastiest recipes are in this book, many of which SYR and I have tasted over the years, now everyone can make and enjoy them anytime they want!

PrmCookBk

The book starts out with a history of Prime Grill, photos of the original location and some of the kitchen crew. Then it has a section on Chef David, menus and a listing of potables. The recipe section is organized as follows:

  • Hors d’Oeuvres
  • Appetrizers
  • Soups
  • Salads
  • Fish
  • Meat
  • Side Dishes
  • Dessert
  • Cooking Foundations
  • Dressings and Sauces
  • Rubs

It was hard to find just one favorite recipe to feature here, but after reviewing the book a few times I opted for this one:

Porcini Mushroom Soup

Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup extra-light olive oil
  • 2 cups onion, small dice
  • 1/2 cup celery, small dice
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 1/2 cups defrosted frozen porcini mushrooms, rough chopped (reserve defrosted liquids)
  • 1/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 6 cups liquid (defrosted liquid + chicken stock to equal 6 cups)
  • 2 cups pareve cream cheese
  • 2 tbsp. salt
  • 2 cups pareve cream cheese
  • Caramelized onions (optional)

In a heavy gauge soup pot, heat extra-light olive oil and sweat the onions and celery until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and cook until aromatic. Add the porcini mushrooms and stir in the flour and cook for another three to four minutes. Add the liquid slowly, working out any lumps from the flour and add salt. Once the liquid is combined bring to  a boil and immediately lower to a simmer in on low heat for a half hour, stirring constantly to prevent burning. Add the pareve cream cheese and combine till smooth. Remove from the heat and let the mixture cool. Puree in a blender until smooth. Serve with croutons or a toasted piece of bread and garnish with caramelized onions.

Chef’s tip: Because you are working with roux, you want to add the water slowly, So that there are no lumps, use a whisk to ensure proper incorporation. In addition, because it is a thick soup, it should be stirred very frequently.

We’ve had this soup quite often as we ate both at Prime Grill and at Solo, we just can’t get enough of it!

Whether you want a recipe to impress the in-laws or your boss, whether you need something fast or you are looking for that special dish for a festive occasion, this is the cookbook for you!

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

10
Dec
13

La Brochette Steakhouse and Sushi Bar


Last evening, SYR and I attended La Brochette‘s (340 Lexington Ave; New York, NY 10016; Tel: 212.972.2200Grand Opening Event. It is located on the premises of the late La Carne GrillUnder the direction of its owners Avi and Reuven Cohen, it acquired a more sedate and contemporary look to give it the distinctive atmosphere that would do full justice to its fare.

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The main floor...

The main floor…

Chef Angel Rodriguez cooked up a memorable menu for the occasion. We started out with the Petit Omakase, a selection of sushi rolls…

White tuna with avocado crunch, tuna/salmon roll and more in a sweet and sour sauce...

White tuna with avocado crunch, tuna/salmon roll and more in a sweet and sour sauce…

For a meat appetizer we had the La Brochette Sampler; it soon became very obvious we were about to be treated to a virtuoso performance of food and heavenly aromas…

Spring roll, wagyu beef brochette and Peking duck

Spring roll, wagyu beef brochette and Peking duck

SYR followed with La Brochette Salad, which came with Boston lettuce, baby corn, haricot vert, Kalamata olives and Ranch-Lemon dressing and she liked it!. I, intrigued, opted for the French Onion Soup. This soup is traditionally covered with bread and melted cheese, since we were at a steakhouse, I just had to see what Chef Angel would come up with and I was pleasantly surprised at the riches, the nuances of flavors.

We both segued with the Roasted Prime Rib, which came with a side of of potatoes Lyonnaise and the house beef glaze, SYR ordered hers medium rare, while I opted for a medium well. Both were excellent choices…

....ample portions, deliciously juicy and tender. Who can ask for more?

….big portions, deliciously juicy and tender. Who can ask for more?

We washed it all down with 2 glasses each of Borgo Reale Pinot Grigio 2012, from grapes grown in the the Friuli Venezia Giulia region. It was pale straw in color, medium bodied, with a fruity aroma and a clean refreshing taste. We should have found a more adequate wine pairing for the robustly flavored roasted rib, though the wine went delightfully well with everything up to the entrée.

SYR finished her repast with a Mascarpone Tiramisu..,

it truly mimicked the dairy original!

…it truly mimicked the dairy original!

while I – an unrepentant chocoholic – opted for a Chocolate Lava with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. We left the restaurant enchanted by the atmosphere, and the succulent dinner. 

...the taste of paradise!

…the taste of paradise!

We run into quite a few old friends, most notably Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, Elan Kornblum from Great Kosher Restaurants Magazine, and Meyer Harroch from New York Kosher Guide, among others. The waiter, a gentleman of the old European schhol (though he was only middle aged), was very attentive and made everyone feel very special. As SYR and I discussed the evening, we both agreed that we’ll have to go back again an again.

CS

19
Nov
13

Thanksgiving Cooking with Gloria Kobrin, Part 2– Root Vegetable Casserole with Caramelized Onions


Here’s Gloria Kobrin again, demonstrating another vegetarian delight:

Root Vegetable Casserole with Caramelized Onions

Serves 10 to 12
Prep time
: Root vegetables-60 minutes, Onions-40 minutes, Baking: 0 min
Equipment: 10 cup pot, large skillet, large mixing bowl, 10 cup casserole, large colander

Ingredients

  •  3 pounds russet potatoes
  • 1 pound turnips
  • 2 pounds parsnips large
  • 5 large onions 10 cup casserole
  • 7 cloves garlic- peeled
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 medium bunch fresh thyme leaves
  • 7 cups fresh/boxed vegetable broth
  • 2 sticks non-dairy margarine-softened
  • Olive oil

Directions

  1. Spray casserole with olive oil.
  2. Peel potatoes and parsnips. Cut them into 1½ inch pieces. Peel and cut turnips into ½ inch pieces. Put vegetables in pot with garlic. Tie thyme and bay leaf together and add to vegetables with stock. Bring to a boil. Cover pot and simmer about 40 minutes until vegetables are very soft. Cool slightly. Remove thyme-bay leaf bundle. Drain vegetables in a colander or lift vegetables out with a spider.. Transfer into large bowl. Mash vegetables with 1 stick margarine until blended yet chunky. Spoon into casserole. Set aside.
  3. Peel and core onions. Slice thinly.
  4. Melt remaining margarine in skillet over high heat. Add onions to skillet and sauté until onions are soft and golden brown- about 25 minutes. Spread onions evenly over smashed vegetables. Bake in 375 F oven until vegetables are very hot and onions have crisped.

Note: Completed casserole may be prepared one day in advance and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before baking. To prepare for freezer: Spoon mashed vegetables into oven to table ware serving dish. Cool completely. Cover with waxed paper and foil and freeze. Defrost casserole the night before serving. Sauté onions and smother vegetable casserole with them on serving day. Serve hot!

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS




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