Archive for June, 2013



20
Jun
13

A Conversation with Rabbi Matatia Chetrit


rabmatchitrThis evening at 10:00pm (Eastern Time) on The Kosher Scene’s Radio Show, our guest will be Rabbi Matatia Chetrit. Rabbi Chetrit iscurrently the President of president of Ohr Binyamin; he received an MBA from NYU Stern Business School and was Director of Marketing for a very successful software company in Switzerland, in the early 90s.

Having come to the conclusion that his soul thirsted for far more than just becoming a CEO, he took a leave of absence for one year and enrolled in Yeshiva Chofetz Chaim in the US, and in Israel, for almost 15 years under the tutelage of Rabbi Zecharia Mines.

In Israel he started a magazine – called Jerusalem Life- a magazine  and now a website – jerusalemlife.com. It’s purpose is to help a person discover him/herself through Judaism  He now serves as Board Member of several Jewish Organizations. The magazine eventually gave him the push to start Ohr Binyamin – a non-profit organization that helps people realize their potential through Judaism.

We will talk about the Pursuit of Happiness, through Spirituality and Judaism’s eternal truths.

Meanwhile in case you missed it, please listen in to our Conversation with Ami Nahari, for some good kosher wine talk.

Please, don’t forget to tune us in this evening at 10:00pm (Eastern Time) on The Kosher Scene’s Radio Show, our guest will be Rabbi Matatia Chetrit. We’ll be wait’n for ya!

CS

20
Jun
13

Kashmiri Lamb – Rogan Josh


Exotic, delicious, Indian dish with just enough spice to keep it interesting:

Kashmiri Lamb – Rogan Josh

RogJosh

Ingredients

  • 5 cloves garlic roughly chopped
  • 1 0nion roughly chopped
  • 1 inch piece ginger root, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tbsp paprika
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 lb lamb, cut into 1 inch chunks
  • 10 cardamon pods, slightly crushed
  • 1 1/4 cups water

Directions

  1. Put the garlic, onion, ginger root, ground spices, salt, tomato paste into a blender and pulse until smooth.
  2. Heat the oil in a flameproof casserole dish, add the lamb and cardamon pods. Fry over high heat to brown the meat on all sides.
  3. Add the blended paste and cook for 5 minutes stirring frequently. Pour in the water and simmer, covered for 1 1/2 hours or until the meat is tender.
  4. Serve over rice with some warmed naan bread.

Indian Style Rice

(from: simplyrecipes.com)

Ingredients

  • 2 cups long-grain rice
  • 8 cups water
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 cloves
  • 2 cardamom pods
  • One 2-inch piece of cinnamon
  • 3 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1/2 tsp dark mustard seeds
  • 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/4 tsp chile flakes
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 chopped garlic cloves
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric

Directions

  1. Place rice in a sieve and run cool water through it to rinse it until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in cool water for 30 minutes. Drain.
  2. Bring 8 cups of water and the salt to a boil in a large pot. Add the rice and stir. Add the cloves, cardamom and cinnamon and simmer for 10 minutes. Taste the rice, and test if it is done to your taste; rice can take more or less time to cook depending on how old it is. If still too firm, cook a few minutes longer
  3. When the rice is cooked to your liking, drain the rice into a colander and rinse with cold water to stop if from cooking. Remove the cloves, cardamom and cinnamon and discard. Set the rice aside to drain.
  4. In a pan large enough to hold the rice, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the mustard and cumin seeds and the chile flakes. Cook until the mustard seeds start popping, then add the onion. Sauté until the onion begins to brown, about 5-7 minutes.
  5. Add the garlic and sauté another 2-3 minutes. Add the rice and mix well. Sprinkle the turmeric over the rice and mix well. Cook for another 3-4 minutes, stirring often.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

18
Jun
13

Jewish Ceremonial Art – The Soul of a People


Art reveals the soul of a people, ceremonial art is a reflection of their longings at any given time. Jewish ceremonial art is an expression of the connection between the people and the Almighty who chose them as His patrimony.

This coming Thursday, the 20th of June Kestenbaum & Company (242 West 30th Street; New York, NY 10001 – Tel: 212.366.1197 – Fax: 212.366.1368) is auctioning off 257 Ceremonial Objects and Works of Art. The auction will start at 3:00 pm precisely.

Leafing through the auction’s catalog I found many lots that were of interest to me because of their beauty, antiquity, memories of similar objects or combinations of all or any of the three.

For many decades now, I've been using a similar becher that originally belonged to my great grandfather, in Poland, given to me at my Bar Mitzvah by an aunt that moved to Uruguay in 1928.

For many decades now, I’ve been using a similar becher that originally belonged to my great grandfather, in Poland, given to me at my Bar Mitzvah by an aunt that moved to Uruguay in 1928.

Pair of Rare Safed Silver Beakers. Exquisitely engraved in typical Safed Fashion with Holy Land sights. Polish Marks. Height 1.75 inches.

19th Century. $2500-3500

Two German spice towers flanking an Austrian spice container

Two German spice towers flanking an Austrian spice container, used for havdala

(left) Tall German Silver Filigree Spice Tower. Four graduating rectangular tiers with filigree ball and flag final in the form of a deer. Matching filigree base set on ball and claw feet. Single bell on belfry and belfry section and circled at base by 4 pennants. Hinged door. 13.5 inches.

18th Century. $16,000-$18,000

A very fine and complete example of a classic form.

>——o——<

(center) Austrian Silver Guilt Spice Container. Pear shaped container, floral and foliate patterning throughout. Flowering stalk, attendant peacok. Set on leafy base. Height 5 inches.

19th Century. $6,000-$8,000

>——o——<

(right) German Silver Spice Tower. Two graduating hexagonal tiers, chased and pierced. Upper section with arched windows revealing three Jewish figures (one restored) holding candle, prayer-book and goblet. Six orbits at steeple and flag finial. Set on figural stem and circular base. Hinged door. Master. Julius Meineke. Height 10.25 inches.

Halberstadt 1725. $30,000-$40,000

Ceremonial art also shows up on parchment, vellum or paper (and there are some wonderful examples of each among the items to be auctioned), as in this megillah

A beautiful Megiilath Esther

A beautiful Megilath Esther

Megilath Esther. Complete Esther Scroll ENTIRELY ENGRAVED on vellum.

Composed on two membranes in eleven columns, with additional introductory column entitled: “Megilath Esther in Zichron Todah.” Columns of text within floriated borders; introductory column with depictions of the characters that populate the Purim story. Composed by Tueringer the Scribe and dedicated to David Loewe Elkin. Housed in contemporary metal tube. Signature at end. 5.5 by 33.5 inches.

Cologne, Cologne 1843. $10,000-$15,000

OF EXCEPTIONAL RARITY

Few engraved Esther Scrolls exist. The Hungarian artist, Mordechai Donath created one in Nitra prior to the current Cologne example.

Another rare item…

Not much is left from Jewish Estonia...

Not much is left from Jewish Estonia…

Unique Estonian Silver Torah Shield. Finely engraved throughout with elaborate fruit, foliate and shell forms; central Decalogue flanked by Moses and Aron. Master. Carl Daniel Bauer, marked. 7.5×6.5 inches.

$25,000-$30,000

This rare Torah shield is fully hallmarked with the initials of Master Carl Daniel Bauer, from the city of Reval, 1798-1815 and with the “83” standard and city mark. The shield is also dated in Hebrew 1823.

Reval, present day Tallin, capital of Estonia and formerly part of Russia – had just a bare handful of Jews living there at the time this Torah shield was produced. Very few items of Judaica emanate from Estonia.

It’s hard to decide what to discuss in this short post, there are many items used at every occasion of the Jewish life cycle, but there are also works of art in this auction; art works which stand on their own merit as a captivated moment of daily life, its pleasures, its travails…

There a quite a paintings, portraits and slices of daily life.

There a quite a paintings, portraits and slices of daily life.

Koloszvary, Laijos. The Chess Players. Oil on canvass. Signed lower left. Framed. 18.5×39.5 inches

Hungarian (1875-1937). $10,000-$12,000

With items estimated from as low as $100 there is enough in this auction for everyone to walk away with a piece of history, a piece of Jewish art; from joyous events to those items commemorating our darkest moments, you’ll find here the laughter and the tears of the collective Jewish soul.

CS

17
Jun
13

Hachnassat Sefer Torah at Manhattan Sephardic


Few events are more joyous in the life cycle of a synagogue, and its community, than acquiring a new sefer Torah – Torah scroll. Not only is it a reaffirmation of the particular congregation’s commitment to follow Hakadosh Baruch Hu‘s commandments, not only is it a reminder of the gift with which the Almighty embraced us as a people, but it is a celebration of our history.

Acquiring a new sefer Tora is a symbol of the tears and the joy, the struggles and the triumphs, a celebration of the fact that against all odds, against all history’s precedents, we haven’t disappeared. In spite of the persecutions, in spite of the blood we shed, we are still here and we’ll still be here long after our tormentors are relegated to mere footnotes in a few forgotten tomes rotting away in the dustbins of history. It is the culmination of the tears, of the hopes, of the prayers expressed by every Jew for three thousand years.

This past Sunday, Manhattan Sephardic Congregation (325 East 75th Street, New York NY 10021, 212-988-6085; www.sepharad.org and www.alephlearning.org), celebrated such an occasion. The new Sefer Torah was dedicated by the Benchimol and Benhamo families in memory of Rabbi Raphael Benchimol‘s father Aharon ben Avraham Z”L Benchimol and a Sefer Haftarot was dedicated by the Schnaider family in memory of Shimon ben Moshe Z”L Schnaider.

Rabbi Benchimol opened the proceedings…

Photography by Irving Schild

Rabbi-Ben-Chimol

He was followed by Gadi Benhamo, who made a siyum Talmud Masechet Berachot

GBenhamo

Live music and singing came next with Chazan Uriel Suliman, accompanied – at times – by Avraham Moshe Benchimol, Rabbi Benchimol‘s son, and followed later by Chazan Marc Hazan

Chazanim

While the music continued, the final letters to complete the Sefer Torah were filled in by various individuals – who bought the privilege – and were helped and guided by the sofer – scribe Rabbi Sebag. The funds collected went to benefit MSC and Aleph Learning Center‘s free Hebrew After School Program and to expand Jewish education for Jewish children in the greater community.

Rabbi Sebag appears in the following photo with Judge Jerome Hornblass

Judge-Jerome-Hornblass

The beautiful new Sefer Torah being shown to the congregation…

TorHag

After the letters were finished and the Sefer Torah completed, everyone proceeded to the celebrate, sing and dance on the street, stretching from First Avenue to the middle of the block, where MSC is located…

SingDancStre1

After the procession on the street, the celebrations continued inside where people danced seven hakafot before putting the sifrei Torah back in the ark, before going upstairs to the third floor for a truly royal repast, the likes of which I’ve never seen at any other synagogue!

CS

10
Jun
13

White Chocolate Ice Cream in a Cookie Cup


I still haven’t been able to kick my chocolate habit, therefore I just had to try this one from Jacqueline Bellfontaine‘s What’s Cooking Chocolate:

White Chocolate Ice Cream in a Cookie Cup

Photo by: St John Asprey, page 195

Photo by: St John Asprey, page 195

Serves 6

Ingredients

Ice Cream

    • 1 egg
    • 1 egg yolk
    • 3 tbsp superfine sugar
    • 5 1/2 oz white chocolate
    • 1 1/4 cups milk

2/3 cup

      heavy cream

**Cookie Cup

  • 1 egg white
  • 4 tbsp superfine sugar
  • 2 tbsp all-pupose flour, sifted
  • 2 tbsp unsweetened cocoa, sifted
  • 1 tbsp butter, melted

Directions

  1. Place baking parchment on 2 cookie sheets. To make the ice cream, beat the egg, egg yolks, and sugar. Break the chocolate into pieces and melt in a double boiler with 3 tablespoons of the milk. Heat the milk until almost boiling and pour into the  the eggs beating. Place over a pan simmering water and cook, stirring, until the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon. Beat in the chocolate. Cover with dampened  baking parchment and cool.
  2. Whip the cream until just holding its shape and fold into the custard. Transfer to a freezer container and freeze the mixture for 1-2 hours until frozen 1 inch from the sides. Scrap into a bowl and beat until smooth. Refreeze until smooth. Refreeze until firm.
  3. To make the cups, beat the egg white and sugar together. Beat in the the flour and cocoa, then the butter. Place 1 tbsp of mixture on one sheet and spread out to a 5″ round. Bake in a preheated oven at 400 F for 5 minutes. Remove and mold over an upturned cup. Let set, then cool on a wire rack. Repeat to make 6 cups. Serve the ice cream in the cookie cup.

** Heavy Cream Substitute

  • 3/4 cup MimiCreme
  • 1 1/2 tbsp unflavored powdered gelatin
  1. Stir together until fully blended
  2. Use in place of one cup of heavy cream.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy! I certainly did.

CS

07
Jun
13

Adas Bis Silq – Lentil and Swiss Chard Soup


One of our readers, Fortuna F, from Los Angeles, sent in this recipe and photo for what promises to be a superb and easy to prepare soup:

Adas Bis Silq

LentilChard-Soup

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups brown lentils
  • 6 cups cold water
  • 10 leaves Swiss chard
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped coriander leaves
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • lemon wedges for serving

Directions

  1. Wash lentils well and place in a heavy pan with the cold water. Bring to a boil, skimming as needed, cover and simmer gently for 1 hour or until lentils are soft.
  2. Was Swiss chard well and cut off stems. Cut leaves down the middle, then shred coarsely.
  3. Heat oil in a separate pa, add onion and fry slowly until it becomes transparent. Stir in garlic and cook for another 15 seconds.
  4. Add shredded Swiss chard to pan and fry, stirring often, until leaves wilt.
  5. Pour onion and Swiss chard mixture into the lentils. Add coriander, salt pepper to taste, then add the lemon juice. Cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes. Serve soup in deep plates with lemon wedgrs for squeezing into soup according to the individual’s taste. It goes perfectly with any Middle Eastern bread.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

06
Jun
13

Sautéed Chicken Breasts


This is an easy recipe to prepare and yet it’s delicious. Proof, again, that a good dish need neither be intricate nor overly time consuming to make.

Sautéed Chicken Breasts

(Adapted from The Best 30-Minute Recipe, by America’s Test Kitchen at Cook’s Illustrated Magazine)

Detail from Photo in The Best 30-Minute Recipe

Detail from Photo in The Best 30-Minute Recipe

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • salt and ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Directions

  1. Spread flour in shallow dish. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. Dredge chicken in flour to coat and shake off excess.
  2. Heat oil in 12″ skillet over medium-high heat until just smoking. Carefully lay chicken in skillet and brown well on one side, 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. Flip chicken over, reduce heat to medium-low, and continue to cook until thickest part of breasts registers 160 degrees on instant-read thermometer, 6 to 8 minutes longer.
  4. Transfer chicken to plate, civer with foil, and let rest at least 5 minutes before serving.

Cooking Tips – To cook chicken breasts correctly, the first thing to consider is size. Be sure to select chicken breasts of equal size, so they will cook evenly. Flouring the chicken prior to sautéing will protect the meat from drying out and helps prevent it from sticking to skillet. Turning the heat down when browning the second side is crucial to prevent the pan from scorching while the chicken cooks through and will avoid a leathery, stringy exterior.

I served it with a wine sauce, made from a recipe also adapted from The Best 30-Minute Recipe.

Red Wine Pan Sauce

The Base of a pan sauce is the fond, or browned bits clinging to the bottom of the skillet after sautéing or searing meat, poultry or fish. Once the skillet protein is removed from the skillet, aromatics such asminced shallots can be sautéed, and then, in a process called deglazing, liquid – usually wine, stock, or both – is added to help dissolve the fond and make a flavorful sauce. The sauce is then simmered to concentrate flavors and chicken.

Makes about 1 1/4 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 shallot, minced
  • Salt and ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup dry red wine
  • 1 1/2 cup chicken stock *
  • 1 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp cornstarch
  • 1 tbsp unsalted margarine, cut into 3 pieces and chilled
  • 1 tsp minced fresh thyme

Directions

  1. After removing cooked protein from skillet, add shallot and 1/4 spoon teaspoon salt to oil left in skillet, return to medium-high heat, and cook until softened, about 2 minutes.
  2. Stir in wine, scraping up any browned bits. Stir in 1 1/4 cup of stock and brown sugar, simmer until sauce measures 1 cup, about 5 minutes.
  3. Whisk remaining 1/4 cup stock and cornstarch together until smooth, then whisk into sauce. Add any accumulated meat juices and continue to simmer, about 2 minutes.
  1. Reduce heat to low and whisk in margarine, one piece at a time. Off heat, stir in thyme and season with salt and pepper to taste.

* Chicken Stock – Brodo di Gallina

Yield: 16 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 small bunch (about 1/2 oz) Italian (flat-leaf) parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 4 pound hen, cleaned and cut into four pieces
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 3 celery stalks
  • 1 large carrot
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 12 black peppercorns
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Directions

  1. Place the celery and peppercorns on a piece of cheesecloth, then using kitchen string, tie the ends of the cheesecloth together to make a bag.
  2. Place 16 cups water in a large pot. Add all other ingredients. Bring to a boil over medium high heat.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 4 hours, skimming the surface occasionally to catch and discard the residue and foam. Add extra water to the broth, making sure the original level of broth is maintained throughout.
  4. Drain the stock through a strainer discarding the vegetables and reserving the flesh for further use in other recipes.

The chicken stock can be refrigerated for up to 4 days or frozen up to 30 days.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

06
Jun
13

Coffee & Chocolate Panna Cottas


pancottaI desperately needed another chocolate fix this week (let me add that I started feeding my weekly chocolate habit, this past Monday at Levana Kirschenbaum‘s with some of her fabulous Chocolate Truffles; I continued with Easy Chocolate Squares), therefore I had no choice but to turn to François Payard‘s Chocolate Epiphany. Leafing through the pages, to my surprised delight, I came across an interesting dessert which I just had to try; as usual, Pâtissier Payard did not disappoint!

From page 130:

Coffee & Chocolate Panna Cottas

Serves 6

Chocolate Panna Cotta

  • 1 tbsp unflavored powdered gelatin
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 4 oz  50% chocolate chopped
  • 1/2 cup Dutch -processed cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Coffee Panna Cotta

  • 1 tbsp unflavextractored powdered gelatin
  • 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 2 tbsp instant coffee granules
  • 1  tbsp pure vanilla
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tbsp sugar

Garnish

  • 1/2 cup apricot preserves

Directions

CHOCOLATE PANNA COTTA:

  1. Sprinkle the gelatin over 2 tbsp of the whole milk, and let stand for 3 to 5 minutes. Put the chocolate in a medium bowl.
  2. Combine the cocoa powderand the sugar. Put the remaining milk and sugar mixture in a small saucepan over medium high heat, and bring almost to a boil. Whisk the gelatin into the milk, then pour the milk ovrer the chocolate. Whisk the gelatin into the milk, then pour the milk over the chocolate. Whisk until the chocolate is melted and the mixture is smooth. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a a small pitcher or a bowl with a spout, and set it aside to cool to room temperature.

MAKE THE COFFEE PANNA COTTA:

  1. Sprinkle the gelatin over 2 tablespoonsof the milk, and let stand for 3 to 5 minutes.
  2. Combine the remaining milk and the coffe, vanilla bean, and sugar in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, and bring almost to a boil. Whisk the gelatin into a mixture until combined. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a small pitcher or a a bowl with a spout, and set it aside to cool to room temperature. If using vanilla extract instead of a vanilla bean, whisk it in it now.

ASSEMBLE THE DESSERT:

  1. Pour some of the chocolate mixture into six tall, clear 4-ounce glasses, so that it fills up about one fourth of each glass. Place the glasses in the freezer to set the panna cotta, but do not let it freeze solid. This will take about 30 minutes. Then pour some coffee mixture over the chocolate one, to fill the glasses halfway. Return the glasses to the freezer to let the coffee panna coota set, about 30 minutes.
  2. Repeat the process with one more layer each of chocolate and coffee. The last layer does not need to be put in the freezer. Refrigerate the glasses until the panna cotta layers are set, about the 30 minutes, or overnight.
  3. To serve, garnish with a dollop of apricot preserves.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

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05
Jun
13

A Conversation with Ami Nahari


Nahari2Our guest this evening’s – at 10:00pm (Eastern Time) – on The Kosher Scene Radio Show is Ami Nahari. He is the CEO and Founder of The River, Ami brings 15 years of business consulting expertise, focusing on customer satisfaction, organizational structure and service management. He is the product of an elite Israeli Army unit and a graduate of the management school at Bar Ilan University, Mr. Nahari is building an organization based on values, ethics, professionalism and state-of-the-art distribution technology.

He’s been a resident of New York City since 2000, Fortune 100 companies hired his services to improve operations and processes. He borrows best practices from the High-Tech and financial industries to establish a state of the art wine distribution operation.

Ami grew up in Efrat, in Gush Etzion where he met the winemaker of the Gush wines, Shraga Rosenberg.  “After my wife, Larissa and I tasted the wines we asked him to allow us to import his wines, but he immediately declined” Ami tells, “but I kept pushing until he said yes.” Today, needless to say Shraga is very happy with the choice he made.

nahari1

The River imports Tishbi Winery, Gush Etzion Winery, Kadesh Barnea, Har Bracha Winery and soon two more wineries will be added to the family. Last year The River started working with ShiraWinery from CA, for two year in a row their products were named by the Jewish Week as Top Kosher Wine.

In case you missed it, please listen in to a fascinating talk we had with various Sotheby’s Judaica experts

Do not forget to listen in tonight at 10:00pm (10:00pm (Eastern Time)

CS

04
Jun
13

Easy Chocolate Squares


Just because something’s very easy to prepare, does not detract from the fact that it still can be delicious. If you want to start your kids or grandkids cooking with chocolate, this is a great beginning!

Easy Chocolate Squares

NoBakChocSqa

Yields: 16 squares

Ingredients

  • 9 1/2 oz dark chocolate
  • 3/4 cup margarine
  • 4 tbsp light corn syrup
  • 2 tbsp coconut flavored liqueur
  • 6 oz plain cookies
  • 1/3 cup toasted rice cereal (non-toasted rice cereal will do well in a pinch)
  • 1/2 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecan nuts
  • 1/2 cup candied cherries, roughly chopped
  • 1 oz white chocolate, to decorate

Directions

  1. Place the dark chocolate in a double boiler with the margarine, syrup, and coconut liqueur over gently simmering water until melted, stirring continuously until blended.
  2. Break the cookies into small pieces and stir into the chocolate mixture, stir in the rice cereal, nuts and cherries.
  3. Line a 7″ inch square cookie pan with parchment paper. Pour the mixture into the pan and level the top, pressing down well with the back of a spoon. Chill in the refrigerator for about 2 hours.
  4. Melt the white chocolate and drizzle over the top of the cake in a random pattern. Let it set.
  5. Carefully take out of the pan and discard the parchment paper. Cut up into 16 squares.

Enjoy!

SYR




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