Archive for December, 2012

28
Dec
12

Pot Roast


[Reader Leah B. – from Miami – sent in this recipe recently. Being a hard-core carnivore, I tried it and found it worthy to be shared. CS]

Pot Roast

Photo submitted by Leah B. - Nice shot,makes me want to reach into the image and grab a piece!

Photo submitted by Leah B. – Nice shot,makes me want to reach into the image and grab a piece!

Serves 3

Ingredients

  • 5 lb chuck roast
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tbsp margarine
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 ribs celery, chopped
  • 2 tbsp flour
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup red wine
  • 2 tsp tomato paste
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 lb (10 to 12) white potatoes
  • 4 carrots, peeled, cut in large chunks
  • 1 lb parsnips, peeled, cut in large chunks
  • 1 tbsp melted margarine
  • 2 tbsp fresh chopped parsley

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 F. season the beef with salt and pepper. Place a Dutch oven on high heat on the stove, add the vegetable oil. When the oil is hot, brown the beef, about 5 minutes per side. Remove the meat to a platter and turn the heat to medium.
  2. Add the margarine, onion, celery, and a pinch of salt. Saute for 4 to 5 minutes, then add the flour. Cook, stirring, 2 minutes, add the garlic, cook for 1 minute. Whisk in the wine scraping to deglaze the browned bits from the bottom of the pot. Add the tomato paste, bring to a boil, and pour in the chicken broth.
  3. Add the bay leaf, thyme, and salt. Bring the liquid to a simmer and put the beef back in the pot. Turn the heat to low and simmer gently for about 45 minutes per pound, or until fork tender. After 2 hours carefully turn the beef over.
  4. Preparing the vegetables: Add the potatoes, carrots, and parsnips to a shallow roasting pan. Drizzle fat from the beef’s braising liquid over the vegetables, along with the melted margarine. Toss the vegetables to coat, and season with salt and pepper. Roast in the oven for 20 minutes. Remove and reserve.
  5. About 30 minutes before the beef is done, add the vegetables to the pot. Continue cooking until the beef  and vegetables are tender. Taste and adjust for salt and pepper. Remove the beef to a platter. Cut into thick slices or simply tear into large chunks, serve with the vegetables and gravy. Top with fresh parsley.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

27
Dec
12

Lemon Veal Soup with Mushrooms


It’s that cold time of the year, and what better way to warm up than with some hot and hearty soup?

Lemon Veal Soup with Mushrooms

LemVeSoup2

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 12 oz boneless veal, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1 onion, quartered
  • 2 carrots, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, halved
  • 1 pared strip lemon rind
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tbsp margarine
  • 12 oz small button mushrooms, quartered
  • 6 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup unflavored MimiCreme
  • freshly grated nutmeg
  • fresh lemon juice, to taste
  • 1 – 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Put the veal in a large saucepan and add the stock. Bring just to a boil. and skim off any foam that rises to the surface.
  2. Add the onion, carrots, garlic, lemon rind and bay leaf. Season with salt and pepper. reduce the heat and simmer, partially covered, for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the veal is tender.
  3. Remove the veal and carrots with a slotted spoon and reserve, covered. Strain the stock, into a clean saucepan. Discard the onion, garlic, lemon rind, and bay leaf.
  4. Melt the margarine in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms, season, and cook gently until golden. Reserve with the veal and carrots.
  5. Mix together the cornstarch and MimiCreme. Bring the cooking liquid just to a boil and whisk in the cream mixture. Boil very gently for 2 – 3 minutes, (until it thickens, whisking almost constantly.
  6. Add the reserved meat and vegetables to the soup and simmer over low heat for about 5 minutes, until heated through. Taste and adjust the seasoning, adding nutmeg and a  squeeze  of lemon juice. Stir in the parsley, then ladle into warmed bowls and serve.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

26
Dec
12

Korean Barbecue (Galbi or, in Japanese, Karubi)


[Like CS I also like to experiment with more than just traditional East European fare. As the mother of a son who occasionally likes exotic flavors, I scoured through my cookbooks to find an interesting, easy to make recipe and this is what I found. This recipe also brings back some memories of the past, memories of another life:

Getting on and off the plane in Korea for buying and chatchka jewelry/accessory design trips in the 80’s, I mostly remember the smell of kimchi – the traditional national cabbage dish of Korea – I’m not sure if it was the long flights or the 5:00 am arrival and crazy non-stop foreign vendor work load, but the smell always made me nauseous. I never developed a yen for the Korean versions of the leafy green, and happily ate my tuna a la suitcase, though I understand it’s now become quite the rave here in the U.S. Go figure!  However, with the secular New Year approaching and new resolutions abounding, we thought we would offer up a relatively healthy Korean grilled dish called Kalbi or Galbi  (means rib in Korean) which can be substituted with chicken, BTW, for the truly resolute.  The beef or ribs are marinated in a Korean style savory sauce comprised of soy sauce, garlic sesame oil, and honey or sugar.  This dish is traditionally made with rice wine although any red wine will do; a hot pepper paste can be added to the marinade for those who want the extra kick to their dish. Enjoy served with your favorite rice recipe. SYR]

This photo doesn't do justice to this dish, but since CS was not available I used the one that appears in the book on page 117

This photo doesn’t do justice to this dish, but since CS was not available I used the one that appears in the book on page 117

From Japanese Kosher Cooking by Kinue Weinstein (page 116)

Korean Barbecue (Karubi)

You’ll need a portable grill placed in the center of the dinner table

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds beef steak (rib eye is the best)
  • 1 green pepper
  • 1 round onion
  • 1 leek
  • 1 Italian eggplant (4 ounces
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 portobello mushroom

Marinade:

  • 1 teaspoon white or sherry
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds, toasted and crushed
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • black pepper

Dipping Sauce:

  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons red wine
  • 6 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon sugar 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 lemon, squeezed

Directions

  1. Slice the beef thinly 2-3 inch pieces.
  2. Combine all the ingredients for the marinade, and marinade for about 20 minutes.
  3. Combine all the ingredients for the dipping sauce, and divide into 4 individual dishes.
  4. Cut the green pepper into 8 sections.Slice the onion in rings. Cut the leek into mpieces 1 1/2 inches long, and slice the eggplant, carrot and mushrooms thinly.
  5. Place the meat and vegetables on platters.
  6. Each diner will grill meat and vegetables on the tabletop grill and eat with dripping sauce when it is finished.
  7. Serve with favorite rice.

Enjoy, I certainly did!

SYR

25
Dec
12

Stuffed Lamb Shoulder


[A few Shabbatot ago, I had lunch at some Sephardic friends’ home; I asked for the recipe of the delicious Lamb Shoulder we had and Mrs. Alma Ohayon emailed me this one. CS]

Stuffed Lamb Shoulder

Serves 6

Photo by: Alma Ohayon

Photo by: Alma Ohayon

Ingredients

  • 1 shoulder of lamb, weighing about 5 lb 8 o, boned and trimmed
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 tbsp flour, blended with 1 tbsp water
  • 1 cup beef or chicken stock

Stuffing

  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 cup lean ground lamb
  • 1/2 cup long grain rice
  • 1/2 cup water
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 cup chopped almonds
  • 1/4 cup raisins
  • 12 no-soak dried apricots, chopped
  • 1 egg, slightly beaten

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F.  Prepare the stuffing. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-heat. Add the onion and cook for 3 to 5 minutes or until it begins to soften. Add the garlic and ground lamb and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring to break up the meat. Stir in the rice and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, or until translucent, stirring frequently.
  2. Stir in the water, salt and pepper, and cumin. Cook covered over medium-low heat for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the liquid is absorbed and the rice is just tender. Remove the from the heat. Add the remaining stuffing ingredients.
  3. Open the meat out flat, skin side down. Spread over the stuffing roll. Roll up tightly and secure with string. Brush with oil. Place on a rack in a roasting pan. Roast for 50 minutes for medium. Brush with honey 15 minutes before the end. Transfer to a serving plate to rest, tented with foil for 15 minutes.
  4. Pour of all except 2 tablespoons of the fat. Set the pan over medium-high heat. Whisk in the flour mixture, stock and vinegar. Bring to a boil while stirring; simmer for 8 minutes, or until thickened. Serve with the lamb.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

24
Dec
12

A Talk with Igal Fedida


This coming Wednesday at 10:00pm (Eastern Time), we will be talking to Igal Fedida. He is a modern painter with a message that extends beyond time. His colors are bold, Hebrew letters appear almost invariably, his brush strokes reveal a lot more about the subject matter than do the works of far more photo realistic artists. In short, though he paints Jewish art, his paintings speak to Jew and non-Jew alike, his works stir up emotions far beyond what the eyes can perceive. While looking at his works, you see the colors dance, you see the colors explode; no definable shape is discernible, yet everything that exists or ever existed is in them.

kosher-scene-copyright-copy21

The artist in front of one of his creations.

The artist in front of one of his creations.

I’ve been speaking to Igal almost daily over last week, his is a fascinating life’s journey to orthodoxy and the healing process of painting. His website, tells us:

Igal Fedida, born and raised in Israel, moved to the United States at an early age to pursue a successful business career in construction, design and remodeling. Being of curious and deeply spiritual nature, however, he decided to take some time to get to know the World and he traveled to many distant and unusual pockets of our home planet. He enjoyed drawing, sketching and design since an early age and he discovered the love for photography during his travels, capturing images of nature and people alike.

Returning to Los Angeles, he enrolled in intensive photography study program at the UCLA. Exploring the world of photography, his need for expression drove him to develop a unique form where he combined Polaroid photographs with water color in order to deepen the effect of the image. In doing so he discovered that his need to express the nature and the World that surrounds us far surpasses the limited potential of photography. Subsequently, as if an invisible hand pointed a direction, the magic door opened and he was pulled into the world of painting.

The gallery (1482 First Avenue, between 77 and 78 in Manhattan, showing his series on Creation.

The gallery (at 1482 First Avenue, between 77th and 78th in Manhattan’s Upper East Side), showing his series on Creation.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, please listen to our broadcast with Dimitry Salita. Dimitry is another interesting personality, an Orthodox Jewish boxer!

Whatever you do, please don’t forget to listen in to our show with Igal Fedida this coming Wednesday at 10:00pm (Eastern Time). In fact, gentle reader, why don’t you call in (at 714.333.3357) while we are talking to this fascinating guest?

CS

For a Night of Wine and Art, to meet Igal Fedida,
to sip some great Israeli  wines and partake of some delicious cheeses
on Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013,
click here

RELATED POSTS

A Night of Wine and Art

A Night of Wine and Art – Part 2

23
Dec
12

Nobo Wine & Grill


Teaneck’s Nobo Wine & Grill (1400 Palisade Avenue; Teaneck, NJ 07666, Telephone: 201.837.1000), never ceases to amaze and delight. Under the direction of Executive Chef Josh Massin (formerly of Manhattan’s Mike’s Bistro), this restaurant which we reviewed before – with a different chef and a different name, though still under the same owners – redefines the meaning of “succulent.” This past Tuesday, the incomparable Lévana, treated SYR and I to this eatery.

We started our culinary adventure by sharing three appetizers: Big Eye Tuna Nicoise

kosher-scene-copyright-copy21

Big Eye Tuna Nicoise - Olive oil poach tuna, with assorted olives, capers, hard-boiled egg, frisee, cinfit campari tomatoes, raw honey emulsion, fried bread & red wine vinegar syrup.

Big Eye Tuna Nicoise – Olive oil poach tuna, with assorted olives, capers, hard-boiled egg, frisee, cinfit campari tomatoes, raw honey emulsion, fried bread & red wine vinegar syrup.

Traditional Cassoulet

Traditional Cassoulet - Bean stew with duck confit, veal sausage, veal bacon & roasted bone marrow on the side.

Traditional Cassoulet – Bean stew with duck confit, veal sausage, veal bacon & roasted bone marrow on the side.

…and Wild Mushroom Risotto. The tuna in syrup, tasted heavenly with a subtle citrusy flavor and sides that perfectly complemented it; the cassoulet was quite reminiscent of a fine cholent, in fact Chef Josh told us that cholent (or chaud lent) was most likely based on this French delicacy. The marrow bone was – for me – a superb touch, after all as a kid I used to fight my dad for these bones. After all these years, after all the changes in palette, nothing compares to a great marrow bone. Hmm, hmm!  The risotto came with parsley puree, salamesian and white truffle oil, strongly flavored and delicious!

We then proceeded to share three mains: Boneless Braised BBQ Short Ribs

Boneless Braised BBQ short Ribs - with roasted garlic & rutabaga mash, smoky cannellini beans, leek sauce, maple syrup infused barbeque sauce.

Boneless Braised BBQ short Ribs – with roasted garlic & rutabaga mash, smoky cannellini beans, leek sauce, maple syrup infused barbeque sauce.

The short ribs, and sides, brought in a beautiful tapestry of perfectly balanced flavors and tender, juicy meat!

We then proceeded with a Crispy Skin Poached Dark Skin Meat Chicken, it consisted of smoky white wine, braised savoy cabbage, local Rusian fingerling potatoes, chicken sausage dumplings, braised leeks, red pepper aioli and garlic crouton. Incredibly flavorful with an orangey taste, and very juicy. We loved it!

But the pièce de résistance was the Butcher’s Cut Steak, not on the regular menu and not always available, it was recommended by the Chef. Cooked sous vide* it came with sauteed haricot vert and Yukon Gold potatoes. It came medium rare, it was superbly tasty, soft like butter and very juicy.

We washed it all down with Segal Merlot 2011, it was adequate without being overpowering

For dessert, in a tremendous display of self restraint, we shared a single Peanut Butter Chocolate torte, with a Lace Cookie and a Cinnamon Ice Cream. Ahhh, a perfect cap to a perfect meal!

A perfect ending!

Just the right ending!

With a very attentive, unassuming Chef, great food, superb company and just the right ambiance… who can ask for more?

CS

*Sous Vide – From the French “under vacuum.” The ingredients are slowly cooked (for as long as 72 hours) in a water bath – while sealed in airtight plastic – as a result the natural juices and flavors stayed undiluted with whatever ingredient is so cooked. The reason for this method of cooking is to cook the item evenly, without overcooking the outside as the inside gets the same amount of donenness, with all around juicier results. Meat, using this method is cooked between 131F. to 140F. Vegetables need a higher temperature.

19
Dec
12

Dimitry Salita, Boxer, Orthodox Jew


After a two week hiatus we are back! Our guest on BlogTalkRadio/kosherscene this evening will be none other than Dimitry Salita, a frum yid, proudly displaying his tzitit, and a top boxer! Sounds like a contradiction? How could a religious Jew, be a boxer. Tonight, please tune us in at 10:00pm (Eastern Time), you’ll hear a fascinating conversation with a personality who’s not just a brawler, you’ll hear a conversation with someone who’ll shutter your every myth, your every misconception, about what makes a top athlete, a top fighter.

I had the immense pleasure of meeting Dimitry last week, I found him to be charming, gentle and totally unassuming. In fact, he was the very opposite of what I ever imagined a professional boxer would be!

kosher-scene-copyright-copy

Alison Josephs (http://www.jewinthecity.com/blog/) and Dimitry Salita at last week's event launching Alison's new video on Jewish Orthodox Celebrities

Alison Josephs (http://www.jewinthecity.com/blog/) and Dimitry Salita at last week’s event launching Alison’s new video on Jewish Orthodox Celebrities.

Who is Dimitry Salita? Wikipedia describes him thus:

Born in Odessa, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union (now Odessa, Ukraine) as Dmitriy Aleksandrovich Lekhtman, Salita was five years old when he saw his first boxing match. “It was Mike Tyson, and I remember dancing around my room that night imitating the moves”, he recalled. Salita moved with his family to Flatbush, Brooklyn, at the age of nine because of the escalating violence against Jews in Ukraine. His father, Aleksandr Lekhtman, was an engineer; his late mother, Lyudmila Salita, was an accountant. He has one brother, Mikhail. He uses his mother’s maiden name as his professional name.

Well, gentle reader, I won’t spoil it for you. You just gotta listen in this evening at 10:00pm (Eastern Time) for what promises to be an absorbing talk with Dimitry Salita, a welterweight boxer who has clearly shown his yiddishkeit will never compromise to the demands of his career.

Meantime, in case you missed it, please listen in to our show with Chaya Rivka Zwolinski, she’s a ghost writer, editor, book doctor and blogger at: http://healthyjewishcooking.com.

Please, don’t miss our  exciting show this evening at at 10:00pm (Eastern Time) with Dimitry Salita. We’ll be waiting for you!

CS

17
Dec
12

Jew in the City


Last Thursday eve, at Manhattan’s Kehilath Jeshurun, Allison Josephs – blogger extraordinaire at Jew In the City – launched her video (JITC’s Orthodox Jewish All Stars)  featuring 10 Jewish Orthodox celebrities. The event was proudly sponsored by Freeda Wigs, The Patchke Princess, Gift of Life and this very blog (The Kosher Scene), among others.

Allison was interviewed by Marshall Hyman from The Wall Street Journal…

kosher-scene-copyright-copy

Allison Josephs and Marshall Hyman from The Wall Street Journal.

Allison Josephs and Marshall Hyman from The Wall Street Journal.

…as well as by Atara Abersfeld from The Jewish Press, Tammy Marks from New Jersey’s Jewish Star and more.

Allison Josephs with the all star Maccabeats and Dimitry Salita

A delicious latke bar (with lots of topping choices), was presented by mother and daughter catering team of Michicas, as well as a donut fondue bar and a superb selection of Israeli wines by Shlomo Blashka (from the Royal Wine Corporation).

Sara Lasry (The Patchke Princess and Kosher Street) this event’s main organizer, followed Dimitry Salita. She explained the significance of this event and what made it important to the media.

Sara Lasry

Sara Lasry

A member of the Maccabeats lit the candles for the sixth night of Chanukah…

No event of this kind would be complete without lighting the Chanukia.

No event of this kind could be complete without lighting the Menorah.

After the lighting, Allison herself gave an emotional speech about her 7 year journey of breaking down stereotypes about Orthodox Judaism. In describing the occasion and her video she said:

This video celebrates freedom – Chanukah is about freedom and contrary to popular belief, Orthodoxy is freedom – it is freedom to seek our path in an elevated way, to become what we are meant to become, the best possible version of ourselves — in a way that is true and fine and full of substance.

The video features nationally known figures from the world of politics, arts, entertainment, sports, publishing and more. It was not only an enjoyable evening with delicious food and wine, not only was a video launched, but the close to 200 people present saw proof positive (as will anyone else watching it) that being an Orthodox Jew does not in any way shape or form preclude following one’s dreams or reaching the highest pinnacles in one’s profession. Nothing of importance is closed to an Orthodox Jew, and neither does he or she need to sacrifice one’s beliefs.

During immediately after the speeches, a interesting and enjoyable music ensemble took over, The Brooklyn Jazz Warriors

Y.A. Gootblatt, vocalist and keyboard player - Brooklyn Jazz Warriors

Y.A. Gootblatt, vocalist and keyboard player – Brooklyn Jazz Warriors

Bravo, bravissimo Allison! I’d be remiss if I did not again mention Sara Lasry’s herculean efforts, the driving force, in putting together this beautiful event in just two weeks.

CS

14
Dec
12

Fried Ice Cream


[Two Tuesdays ago, I video taped Geila Hocherman making Fried Ice Cream. One of the perks of taping Chefs at work is that I get to taste their creations… Let me tell it was truly delicious, so I feel compelled to share and re-post the recipe from Geila’s Kosher Revolution. Whether it is Chanuka or any any other holiday, whether it is winter, summer, spring or autumn, you can enjoy this treat at any time; even if… you are not kid! CS]

© 2012 Geila Hocherman. All Rights Reserved

Fried ice cream? Believe or not, there is such a thing! This is based on a Mexican treat and once you taste, you’ll just want more and more whether it’s Chanukah or any other time.

  • Frosted flakes
  • Your Choice of nuts
  • Your choice of ice cream flavor (formed into balls)
  • 1 egg
  • sugar to taste
  • oil for frying
  • dunking chocolate sauce
  1. Crush some frosted flakes and any nuts, of your choice, in a bag. Cover the ice cream balls with the crushed flakes and nuts. Refreeze.
  2. Mix egg with sugar. Dunk in the ice cream balls, cover with the frosted flakes and nuts. Refreeze.
  3. Heat oil to 375 F. Take the covered ice cream balls from freezer. Put a chopstick in each of them and dunk in oil for 15 seconds.
  4. When ready, dip each ball into some chocolate sauce and… that’s all there is to them!

Geila

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS




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