Archive for April, 2012

30
Apr
12

3rd Annual Shavuos Contest!


We are proud to announce our 3rd Annual Shavuos Contest. Last year’s prize (a beautiful basket of cholov Yisroel N&K cheeses), went to Pessy Haskelevich in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn; the year before that Brachie S. from Lakewood took the top honors and also received a great selection of cholov Yisroel N&K cheeses. Both times Brigitte Mizrahi, from Anderson International Foods graciously supplied the prizes.

This year Brent Delman from The Cheese Guy.com is supplying the prize:

Photo by: Brent Delman, The Cheese Guy

Two winners will be selected and each will receive a basket consisting of: Italian Montaggio and Pecorino Romano, Pepper Jack, Mild Cheddar, Monterrey Jack and Aged Havarti as well as a jar of honey and a jar of Swiss Hero preserves. All cheeses are cholov Yisroel.

The last date for entries will be May 25th (the Friday prior to erev Shavuot which will start on Motzey Shabbat) at 12:00pm. We will choose the best dairy recipe using cheeses as one of the ingredients. We’ve had some great entries in the past, be creative and send us your best. Winners will be announced on June 4th, the first Monday following Shavuot.

You may enter multiple times if you believe you have more than one possible winning entry. We can’t wait to sample those recipes!

Please send us your recipes to:

kosherscene@gmail.com

CS

30
Apr
12

Red Grape Soup


There’s more to it than just vegetables, and/or noodles. Not only is soup good comfort food in the winter, not only can it warm a cold bodyon a freezing winter day, it can also cool us on a hot summer day. Pamela Reiss, in her Soup -A Kosher Collection gives us many delicious recipes of every kind, ranging from winter comfort types to refreshing summer ones.

Photo by Michelle Furbacher, page 190 Soup - A Kosher Collection

Here’s one I tried last evening, it was easy to make and absolutely delicious:

Red Grape Soup

Serves 5

This lovely, elegant chilled soup is wonderful as a starter. Taste one of the grapes before you cook them; if they are exceptionally sweet, you may want to hold off on adding the granulated sugar.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 lb red grapes
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup dry red wine

Directions

  1. Place all ingredients in a soup pot, cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer on low for 5 minutes, or until grape skins start to split.
  2. Purée the soup. (Use a blender, a hand blender, or a food processor to purée a soup. Do it in small and be very careful. Put a towel over the top of the food processor or blender to prevent any hot soup from spaying. If you are concerned about processing the hot liquid, allow the soup to cool beforehand.
  3. Pour the soup through a fine-mesh strainer to remove any seeds and skin, and transfer to a clean bowl. Chill the soup for for a minimum of 4 hours, or until it is completely cold.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

27
Apr
12

Chef’s Profile – Ladino’s Alexandre Petard


Chef Alexandre Petard from Ladino – Tapas Bar and Grill (940 Eighth Avenue, between 56th and 55th Street in Manhattan’s Columbus Circle area), never imagined himself as anything other than a Chef. At 14, he began cooking in his father’s French restaurants and continued his formal training in his native France.

After graduation, Alexandre moved on to the UK – spending several years polishing his English and honing his culinary skills in various cuisines and techniques. Returning to France, he became French Defense Minister’s Chef; he followed that stint by coming to New York to further perfect his skills – in 1996 – where he expected to stay for only eighteen months. Although he was expected to return to France to run his father’s restaurants… he’s still here, luckily for us!

Locally, Chef Alexandre has worked at such prestigious prestigious as Jean Georges, Lespinasse, and Les Halles. In the kosher scene, he ran the prestigious kitchens of the Boxtree (probably New York’s foremost French restaurant, in its day) and La Carne Grill. Using vision built on years of talent and expertise, Ladino‘s concept was born; Alexandre was convinced that for an eatery to succeed in Manhattan – in a high rent, high expectation district – the establishment has to be more than just a place to eat.

Customers want ambiance in the restaurants they frequent. They want to be entertained, to be seduced by its good food and pleasant atmosphere. To create an environment reflective of his vision, Ladino‘s walls are painted in Mexican like adobe, adorned with Diego Rivera frescoes – painted by Uruguayan artist, Alex Morales. Resuming after Shavuot, musicians Hernan Romero (on guitar) and Carmen Estevez (as the percussionist), will provide live music (instrumentals only!) every motzey Shabbat.

As you will hear on our broadcast next Wednesday, at 8:00pm (Eastern Time), Chef Alexandre Petard has put a lot of thought and effort in creating an authentic atmosphere at Ladino. His dream was to create a place that attracts Jews of all degrees of religiosity as well as non-Jews who want to enjoy the unique flavors of Latin American, Spanish and Portuguese cuisines and experience the distinctive atmosphere of such a locale. In this, he has succeeded.

CS

22
Apr
12

Chard, Mushrooms and Swiss Cheese Fritatta


Swiss chard is one of the most popular Mediterranean vegetables, while every vegetable has its own unique qualities, this one is rich in antioxidants and more. It is considered one of the most nutritious vegetables around, second only to spinach. Having said that, let’s face it we all remember the healthy food that tasted horrible, the foods that mom had to preface with: “Eat it, it’s good for you!” Well, surprise, surprise, Swiss chard actually enhances the flavor of any dish it’s used in!

This morning, for breakfast, I made frittata from a recipe I found in Sara Jay‘s Knives cooks Love:

knives cooks Love, detail from photo on page 130

Chard, Mushrooms and Swiss Cheese Fritatta

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 pound Swiss chard
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 8 ounces white mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus extra for sprinkling
  • 1/2 cup cup minced shallots
  • 8 large eggs
  • 1/4 cup half and half
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 2/3 cups (5 ounces) grated Gruyère cheese

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F.
  2. trim the stems from the chard leaves. discard the stems. immerse the leaves in water to rid them of grit. Lift them out and drain. Crop the leaves coarsely.
  3. Heat 3 teaspoons of oil in a 10 inch ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, sprinkle lightly with salt and sauté, stirring frequently, until golden brown, for 5 to 7 minutes. Lower the heat to medium, add the shallots, and cook until the shallots are softened but not browned, about 30 seconds. Add the chard a few handfuls at a time and cook, tossing with tongs, until soft and wilted, about 4 minutes.’ Add 1/4 spoon of the salt and continue cooking and tossing until all the liquid in the pan evaporates, about 3 more minutes. Turn off the heat.
  4. Whisk the eggs, half and half, mustard, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, and several grinds of pepper together in a medium bowl. Stir in the cheese. add the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil to the skillet and heat over medium heat. spread the out the vegetables evenly and, when the pan is hot, pour in the egg mixture. cook until the bottom is set, about 3 minutes, and then transfer the skillet to the oven.Bake in until the eggs are set on top, about 15 minutes.
  5. Place the  frittata under a broiler a few inches from the heat source until the top is golden, 2 to 3 minutes. remove from from the heat and let rest for a few minutes; the fritatta will pull away from the sides of the pan. Slice in the pan or else flip the frittata onto a plate and serve.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy; I did!

CS

19
Apr
12

Italian Chocolate Truffles


I found this delicious, easy to make, recipe in Jacqueline Bellefontaine‘s What’s Cooking – Chocolate, I changed one ingredient (butter) to make it parve and it still tasted great, in fact these truffles disappeared in no time!

Photo by: St John Asprey - What's Cooking Chocolate, page 251

Italian Chocolate Truffles

Yields: 24 truffles

Ingredients

  • 6 ounces dark chocolate
  • 2 tbsp almond flavored liqueur (amaretto) or orange flavored liqueur
  • 3 tbsp unsalted margarine
  • 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/2 cup ground almonds
  • 1 3/4 ounces grated chocolate

Directions

  1. Melt the chocolate and the liqueur in a double boiler, stirring until combined.
  2. Add the margarine and stir until it has melted. Stir in the confectioners’ sugar and the ground almonds
  3. Leave the mixture in a cool place until firm enough to roll about 24 balls.
  4. Place the grated chocolate on a plate and roll the truffles in the chocolate to coat them.
  5. Place the truffles in paper candy cases and chill.

Cook’s Tip: These truffles will keep for about 2 weeks in a cool place.

Variation: For a dairy, sweeter, truffle use milk chocolate and sweet butter instead of dark chocolate and margarine. Dip the truffles into melted chocolate to finish, if desired.

Either variation goes great with coffee. Personally, I can’t wait to make the dairy variation. These truffles could then become a great breakfast, or dairy lunch (or dairy dinner) treat.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

17
Apr
12

Fragments of Redemption


Sometimes Hashem grants the gift of a single moment encapsulating a simple microcosm of pure perfection; etching every granted beat as a precious seal on one’s heart, sweeping past too swiftly in a world of the hidden time keeper’s making.

As we reached shfoch chamatcha in the Hagaddah, I made my annual trek through the living room of my youth to open the door for Eliyahu Hanavi… My immediate family was there, seder-side, enwrapped in songs of waiting – trembling tears streaming down our faces – mixed states of personal and collective gratitude weighted with the historical consciousness of our nation’s past and present predicaments.

The longing, heavy swollen laboring, colliding with the voices and cries of our predecessors reaching for that beseeching prayer that unites us all as we call upon our supreme compassionate Master of nature defying miracles to redeem us yet again from slavery to redemption; a tattered messiah in the shadows weighted and waiting too. The night of seder – no matter our status – we are engaged as His emissaries begging for a hastening of Mashiach‘s arrival and the binyan (building) of His Bayit Shlishi bimhera biyamenu; along with the lasting peace our hearts, souls and homeland long for.

V’af al pi sheyitmameah im kol zeh achakelo, achakelo bechol yom sheyavo (and though he may tarry, we wait for him everyday) with melody streaming into the night, it was my father who came beside me first at the opened door waiting in the darkness for Elyahu to arrive.

We stood wrapped in each others’ arms holding on to one another – comforted in our binding love- appreciating the warmth of its flow and wordless significance. As we embraced that timeless moment together, I felt the small benign hump on the back of his emaciated frail frame. I thought of the burdens that tired back had carried throughout the years. The annual draping of the matzo bag over his shoulder declaring, kinderlach – dus is der oremer broyt mein  taire yidden hobn geschlepped fun Mitzrayim (this is the bread of affliction our dear Jews carried from Egypt), was just the tip of the remnant burdens my father had carried throughout his life…

Jumping with another teenager off a train bound for Auschwitz, disguised in a stolen German officer’s uniform as he smuggled medicine and food into the Budapest ghetto, he was saved by Raoul Wallenberg as he was about to be arrested. Burning his Talmudic scholar uncle’s Russian uniform as he slept dreaming of honors and glory that would never be his to collect, all of it redirected him back toward his yiddishe roots.

He convinced a general at the Tattersaal Death March that his oozing shrapnel wounds could infect everyone and that he should be sent to hospital; Dad’s countless acts of long forgotten bravery that will never be recorded… he assisted his father with a soup kitchen, after the war, for those returning to find family survivors, when nothing seemed to have meaning anymore… He drove the fateful wagon to retrieve his surviving family- a mother and 7 other children- who never came back, while his father waited in breathless anticipation – a pauper’s table set for kings that night, crestfallen when all who returned were an elderly bobbe and a few surviving cousins.

Never again could father and son look into each other’s eyes without re-experiencing that moment of pain and abysmal loss, burdens we should never know. An orphan teen swept floors here in the goldene medine, rebuilding a semblance of a life, a family, finding a reason to go on through toil and strife, scrounging scraping together pennies. Living on soup and bread, building a shem tov, doing chassadim benistar, keeping faith with the One that seemed to have turned His back on innocents and holy torah giants, yet… yet saved him – personally – countless times.

Breaking his back to provide  a Jewish education and home for his children, Dad working together with his wife of many years to build a bayit neeman.  Burdened anew with diagnoses of benign meningioma’s pressing that could be plucked right out by her cowboy top brain surgeon that left her a cerebelerless ragdoll – her balabusta high skill and zeal knocked right out from under her… down to wheel chair size. Dad’s fighting, simultaneously, a debilitating muscle condition didn’t stop him for a moment from rushing home and building bars throughout the house so his wife would have as much mobility as possible.

Doing more than any husband would to maintain order and normalcy in our lives and making mom feel like she is and will always remain his eshet chayil.  Burdens on that back of his only grew in their complexity physically and emotionally, But he never stopped doing,  he never stopped believing that Hashem would come save him again and again; for as long as it would take.

I want to hasten my redemption –  there is so much I could, should be doing and yet my eyes are toward shamayim searching, hoping, waiting… when in truth, like my father, I should shoulder the burdens as he does hastening  directionality of our movements in the bringing of mashiach tzidkeynu.

SYR

06
Apr
12

Ladino Tapas Bar and Grill – Just Opened and Kosher for Passover


Located at 940 8th Avenue (between 56th and 55th Street) in the Columbus Circle area of Manhattan, Ladino is set to become a new jewel on the crown of New York City’s superb kosher restaurants.

Ladino opened its doors last week on Thursday, this past Tuesday evening I decided to try it out. As I walked in, I was immediately struck by its beautifully themed décor, that blended the modern with a traditional but upscale Mexican ambiance.

The very talented Alex Morales (a fellow Uruguayan), was finishing his reproductions of two Diego Rivera murals:

The unfinished Flower Vendor is on the left and El Vendedor de Alcatraces (Calla Lilies) is on the right. The décor was completed with antiqued, floral, copper ceiling tiles.

There is a nice modern themed bar at the back but, because Ladino opened ready for Pessach, it only offered wine (mevushal) selections, no beer, no liquor.

I came in as soon as they opened for dinner at 5:00pm, so as to make sure there would be few people to get in the way of my taking photos of the place, by the time I left at around 7:30pm it was starting to fill up.

Under the direction of Alexandre Petard (who was the extraordinary opening chef at the late, lamented, La Carne Grill) – who has a noteworthy record of having worked at some of New York’s most celebrated restaurants, such as Jean Georges, Lespinasse and Les HallesLadino offers a nice selection of Tapas (hot and cold), appetizers and main courses.

I started the evening with Guacamole and Yuka chips…

It was the best guacamole I’ve had in quite a while, very flavorful without extra spices that could detract from the delicate taste. I went on to try samplings of the Ceviche de Atun (Tuna), Ceviche de Salmon, and Ceviche de Red Snapper. None of them showed any fishiness in either flavor or odor, I liked all three. Obviously they were very fresh!

I washed it all down with a Binyamina Chardonnay 2011. It was a medium bodied, fresh, fruity, aromatic wine with notes of pear, melon and citrus peel. Light gold with a slight greenish tint in color, though not my favorite choice (perhaps because of its youth) it actually matched the ceviches quite well.

I segued with Pincho Moreno, a set of chicken and beef skewers hot Tapas dish. It normally comes with a house mayonnaise (made to perfection by the French chef!), but I requested a bit of guacamole as well.

While the mayonnaise was my favorite, the guacamole provided an interesting taste variation to the very tender, very juicy, very flavorful poultry and beef skewers. Beautiful to the eye, as you can see above.

My favorite of the evening, since I am a carnivore to the core, was the Steak a la Cazuela

Nicely presented in a cast iron pan seating on a trivet, the steak pieces were surrounded and topped with mixed peppers, onion, mushrooms and guacamole. The aroma was captivating, the juiciness and flavor conjured up the tastiest steaks I’ve tasted in my youth in Uruguay. With the vegetables having absorbed some of the meat juices, the totality of this dish worked like a carefully orchestrated symphony under the baton of one of the world’s great conductors. I washed down these two meat dishes with a glass of red wine consisting of a blend of merlot, cabernet sauvignon and petite syrah. I did not get the name nor the vintage but it was very fruity in its aroma, with strong citrus notes, not so perfectly balanced tannins (again, a young wine), with hints of purple plum and a mild tobacco with a long finish. Interestingly, it paired superbly well with the steak.

I crowned the evening with a very nice, parve, mango ice cream (complements of Chef Alexandre… It pays to be among the first customers at a new restaurant!). It was hard to believe it contained no milk, but the ability to substitute is part and parcel of a real French chef’s magic.

A perfect place to go out to during chol hamo’ed. As for me, I expect to return after Pessach to see what the regular menu, with far fewer limitations, will be like.

Meanwhile…

Chag kasher vesame’ach!

CS

05
Apr
12

Great Chefs – Great Passover Recipes


From Chef David KolotkinCorporate Chef for the Prime Hospitality Group

Almond Crusted Veal Chop

Non-gebrochs – serves 2

Ingredients

  • 2 12oz bone in veal chops, ask your butcher for center cuts, or from the loin end
  • 1 egg, beaten (eggwash)
  • 1 cup finely ground almonds

Brine

  • 2 qts water
  • ½ cup kosher salt
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 pc bay leaf
  • 1 bunch fresh thyme
  • 30 pc black peppercorn
  • 1 star anise
  • 8 pc clove

Directions

  1. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Combine ingredients 4-11 and bring to a simmer for 10 minutes.
  3. Cool the brine by placing in an ice bath.
  4. When the brine is cool, submerge the veal chops in the brine and refrigerate for 5 hours.
  5. Remove the veal chops, pat dry.
  6. On only 1 side (presentation side), brush with the egg wash, then dredge in the ground almonds.
  7. Over medium heat, brown in a large skillet with enough oil to coat the pan, almond side first. When lightly brown, turn over and brown the other side.
  8. Place in a 350 degree oven for approx 15-20 minutes. I prefer to cook this to medium

—–x)0(x—–

From Chef Jeff Nathan, Owner/Chef at Abigael’s

Chicken Milanese with Tomato
and Arugula Salad

Gebrochs – serves 2

Tomato Salad

  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 ripe tomatoes, preferably 2 red and 2 yellow, cut into 1/2-inch dice
  • 2 tablespoon fresh basil, cut in thin ribbons
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 12 ounces arugula, washed and dried, torn into bite-sized pieces

Chicken

  • 4 8-ounce skinless and boneless chicken cutlets
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup matzo flour (also called matzo cake flour)
  • 2 cups Jeff Nathan Passover Panko flakes, or 1/2 cup matzo meal & 1/2 cup matzo farfale
  • 3 large eggs, beaten with 2 teaspoons water
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Lemon wedges, for serving

Directions

Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 400°F.

  1. To make the tomato salad, whisk the lemon juice and oil in a medium bowl. Add the tomatoes, basil, oregano, and rosemary and toss. Season with salt and pepper. Cover and let stand at room temperature, stirring occasionally, while preparing the chicken.
  2. Place the chicken breasts between sheets of plastic wrap or waxed paper. Using a heavy mallet or rolling pin, pound the meaty part of each cutlet until about 1/2-inch thick.  Season the cutlets with salt and pepper
  3. Place the matzo flour in a shallow dish, the egg mixture in a second shallow dish, and the Passover Panko or matzo meal mixed with the matzo farfale in a third shallow dish. Coat each cutlet with the matzo flour, then the egg wash, and then the Panko or matzo meal.
  4. Heat the oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium heat until hot but not smoking. Add the cutlets and cook, turning once, until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Place the browned cutlets on a large baking sheet. Bake until they feel firm when pressed in the centers, 5 to 8 minutes.
  5. Just before serving, add the arugula to the tomato salad and mix. For each serving, place a cutlet on a dinner plate, and heap the tomato salad on top. Serve immediately, with a wedge of lemon.

Enjoy, gentle reader,enjoy!

CS

04
Apr
12

Simplicity and Elegance Rolled Into One – Cooking with Lévana Kirschenbaum


Traditionally women have slaved away cleaning and cooking for Passover, almost making this season into something akin to an Egyptians’ Revenge. While there is no doubt that celebrating the sedorim (aside from the religious reasons) is beautiful, getting there is not easy. While we can’t make your cleaning either easier or faster, Lévana – in the video below – shows us how to cook faster, easier and still enjoy a feast!

Lévana regales us with three fast, delicious, wholesome recipes from her new book: The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen – Glorious Meals Pure and Simple

Chicken and Swiss Chard

  • 8 serving pieces chicken (2 pieces per person, for example: 6 thighs, 6 drumsticks, 4 half breasts – 16 pieces, total for 8 people) with skin on.
  • 2 teaspoons turmeric
  • 2 large bunches of Swiss chard, leaves and ribs sliced thin
  • 3 cups water

Place all ingredients in a wide heavy pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the flame to medium and cook covered for about an hour. Transfer the chicken pieces onto a platter. If the sauce is not thick enough, reduce it on a high flame, uncovered , just a few minutes until it reaches the consistency of maple syrup. Pour the sauce over the chicken. Serve hot. Makes 8 servings.

Salmon in Pomegranate Sweet-&-Sour Sauce

Sweet-and sour combinations work beautifully with salmon. The onions caramelize and contribute a sweet counterpoint to the vinegar. Another quick and delicious dish, just the way it I like it – one pan, one step.

  • 1 whole side salmon, no skin, no bones, about 3 1/2 pounds, trimmed
  • 1 large red onion, sliced very thin (use the food processor)
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 cup pomegranate juice
  • 1/4 cup unfiltered apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric

Preheat the oven to 425 F. Place the salmon in a pan just large enough to accommodate the fish in one layer. Scatter the onions on top and on the sides of the fish. Mix the oil, juice, vinegar, tomato paste, salt, pepper and turmeric in a bowl, and pour over the fish. Cook about 20 minutes, or a tiny bit more until the fish flakes easily and the liquids thicken. Serve hot or at room temperature. Makes 8 main course servings or a dozen or more course servings.

Chocolate Dipped Fruits

  • Bananas, orange, strawberries, pinneapple cubes, banana segments
  • 2 cups very good quality semisweet chocolate chips
  • 2 tablespoons oil

2 cups very good quality semisweet chocolate chips plus tablespoons vegetable oil. Melt in a small saucepan, on a very low flame, stirring, until just melted. Let cool just a few minutes, then dip only half way the fruit of your choice: strawberries, orange segments, pineapple cubes, banana segments etc… Arrange the dipped fruit on a platter sprayed with vegetable spray (to prevent the chocolate from sticking). Serve at room temperature.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

03
Apr
12

Passover Recipes on The Kosher Scene


Since we started this blog, in November 2009, we posted some excellent Passover recipes. Here, to help you find them all, we bring you the links. To help you with more recipes that only require very short and easy preparations, we will post (tomorrow) a video of the incomparable Lévana preparing three easy dishes to be enjoyed anytime during the eight days of Pessach or any other time of the year. Our recipes feature both gebrochs and non-gebrochs recipes to fit every taste, every need.

Pamela Reiss‘ offers us her superb Turkey Pineapple Meatballs. Eran Elhalal, owner/Chef at the celebrated non-kosher Saro Bistro in Manhattan’s Lower East Side presents us a succulent Pesach Almond-Pistachio Cake, that serves 12.

Chef Laura Frankel, of legendary Shallots fame and now head of Wolfgang Puck‘s kosher division treats to her Chocolate Mousse with Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Poached Halibut in Olive Oil and Parsley Sauce with Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

Check out Chicken & Vegetable Croquettes and Stuffed Portabellini Mushrooms, you can’t help but love them!

Fish lovers… Chef David Kolotkin‘s Passover Chilean Sea Bass will completely seduce your palate!

For brisket recipes look at Passover Brisket Recipe or Chef Emeril Lagasse’s Passover Brisket.

If you want a twist on the traditional brisket, check out Lévana‘s award winning, oft reprinted Passover Brisket Recipe.

Chef Jeff Nathan, shares a recipe from his cookbook Adventures In Jewish Cooking, Veal Chops Milanese with Tomato Salad and Arugula.

My co-blogger SYR regales us with her mom’s superb Drum Cookies

One of my daughter in law’s makes this Rolled Chicken


Oyyy is this good!!!

And this year, so far we’ve posted Geila Hocherman‘s recipes (Cinnamon chicken tajine with prunes and apricots, Mina and Pignoli Cookies or her ) and her food and wine pairing videos with Costas Mouzouras from Gotham Wines and Liquors. Check them out, we know you’ll love them as much as we did! And don’t forget that you you can eat healthy, good food like Bonnie Gilger‘s Matzo Stuffed Chicken Cutlets.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS




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