Archive for November, 2011

30
Nov
11

Graduation Time at CKCA!


Yesterday the Center for Kosher Culinary Arts held their graduation parties for students completing the latest Baking & Pastry Arts and Culinary Arts Programs.

Except for Jesse Blonder's photo of the Culinary Arts Program graduates

From left to right: Shirley Sasson, Lianne Azizollahoff, Ariel Benzakein, Ari Susswein, Eido Jacobowitz, Ben Elchonen, Chef Philippe Kaemmerlé

Chef Philippe Kaemmerlé, the instructor of the Baking & Pastry Program, trained in France, emigrated to New York in 1986, at the age of 28,  and worked as a Pastry Chef in some of New York’s most prestigious restaurants (including Club 21, Windows on the World  and Aquavit, among others). He’s done extensive work with various celebrated caterers and started teaching at CKCA in February 2010.

"Delicious" is an understatement!

Chef Philippe‘s meticulously trained Baking & Pastry Arts graduates – six in number, this time around –  presented us with eclairs, bavarians, chocolate cake, fruit pies, bread, cheese cake and more; presentation was both aesthetic and delicious!

In the early evening Chef Avram Wiseman (no stranger to these pages!) – CKCA‘s Dean and Instructor of the Culinary Arts Program – presented his graduating class of eleven students.

Top row, left to right, Tiffany Tarazi, Sarah Korn, Linda Hidary, Miriam Kronenberg, Elisheva Kohanteb, Chef Wiseman, Yehuda Weinstein. Bottom row, left to right, Ari Susswein, Chananya Rosenthal, Moti Ingber, Shalom Cohen, Miriam Blum (Photo by: CKCA's Director, Jesse Blonder)

With a cocktail style buffet we were treated to shitake tapanades, deviled eggs, salmon pinwheels, stuffed tomatoes, sushi, spicy meatballs and an assortment of other tasty delicacies.

Great presentation, incredibly tasty!

Having eaten at various establishments where CKCA grads are employed, having tasted what these students prepared, I have no doubt that they are bound for glory and success at some fine restaurants.

Congratulations graduates! Congratulations Chef Philippe, congratulations Chef Avram, congratulations Jesse! But, stay warned… we will review the eateries where the members of these two graduating classes may find themselves.

CS

28
Nov
11

Red Lentil Soup


This past Shabbos we read Parshas Toldos, in it we have the episode of Eisov selling his first born rights to Yaakov for a pot of red lentils. We will never know what recipe Yaakov made but on scouring the web I found some delicious sounding variations of Red Lentil Soup, which I can’t wait to try:

Red Lentil Soup with Lemon

Recipe and photo from: superspark.wordpress.com

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, more for drizzling
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, more to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Pinch of ground chili powder or cayenne, more to taste
  • 1 quart chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 cup red lentils
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and diced
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon, more to taste
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro or parsley

Directions

  1. In a large pot, heat 3 tablespoons oil over high heat until hot and shimmering. Add onion and garlic, and sauté until golden, about 4 minutes.
  2. Stir in tomato paste, cumin, salt, black pepper and chili powder or cayenne, and sauté for 2 minutes longer.
  3. Add broth, 2 cups water, lentils and carrot. Bring to a simmer, then partially cover pot and turn heat to medium-low. Simmer until lentils are soft, about 30 minutes. Taste and add salt if necessary.
  4. Using an immersion or regular blender or a food processor, purée half the soup then add it back to pot. Soup should be somewhat chunky.
  5. Reheat soup if necessary, then stir in lemon juice and cilantro. Serve soup drizzled with good olive oil and dusted lightly with chili powder if desired.

(makes 1 quart; 4 small servings)

Food Network.com’s website has the following recipe, among others:

Red Lentil Soup

Recipe and photo from: http://www.foodnetwork.com

Ingredients

  • 1 cup red lentils, washed and soaked for 1 hour, drained
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 large tomato, diced
  • 1 green serrano chile, split and seeded
  • 1-inch piece ginger, peeled and minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • Kosher salt
  • Honey, to taste
  • Chopped cilantro leaves, for garnish

Directions

In medium saucepan, over medium heat, combine the drained lentils, onion, tomato, chile, ginger, garlic and enough water to cover. Bring to boil, then lower the heat and simmer until the lentils are tender, about 30 to 45 minutes. Whisk the cooked lentils to release some of their starch and break them down further.

In small saute pan, warm the canola oil over medium heat. Add the cumin seeds and cook until they are sizzling and spluttering. Stir in the turmeric and paprika. Pour the seasoned oil into the lentils (be prepared for a big sizzle). Stir to combine, add salt, to taste, and a small drizzle of honey. Ladle into soup bowls and garnish with cilantro.

Per Serving: Calories: 273; Fat: 8g (Saturated Fat: 0.5 grams); Protein: 14g; Carbohydrates: 37g; Sugar: 7g; Fiber: 8g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 131mg

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

24
Nov
11

Pecan Pie – Part 2 – Maple Pecan Pie


Last Sunday we posted a recipe for Pecan Pie, here’s a delicious variation on the theme from Geila Hocherman‘s Kosher Revolution (page 170):

SYR's pie from the recipe, photographed by Irving Schild for The Kosher Scene

Every so often I get a pecan pie urge, for me, means I need to make one. On one such occasion I discovered I didn’t have the corn syrup, the traditional sweetener. The serendipitous replacement was maple syrup, which adds its own great flavor as well as sweetness. I also found a store-bought frozen pie shell – my standard go-to when making this, especially when its part of a big-deal holiday menu. Feel free, of course, to make your own crust, but a bought shell works beautifully here and saves toons of time. Using chopped and whole pecans adds textual interest.

Convert It

To make this dairy, use unsalted butter in place of Margarine

Ingredients

  • One 9-inch frozen pie crust
  • 1 1/2 cups pecan, 1 cup coarsely chopped, the remaining whole
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup pure maple syrup
  • 3/4 cup packed light sugar
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons margarine, melted
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F
  2. Cover a cookie sheet with foil and place the pie crust in it. Spread the chopped nuts over the crust and arrange the whole nuts on top. Set Aside.
  3. In a medium bowl combine the flour, syrup, sugars, eggs, margarine and vanilla. Stir to blend and pour over the nuts. Bake until the filling is set and slightly puffed, about 60 minutes. Transfer to to a rack to cool before serving.

Easy to make and superb tasting… who can ask for anything more? Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

24
Nov
11

Maple-Roasted Turkey with Apples, Fennel and Parsnips


For us Jews every day is a day we thank Hashem for both the open and hidden miracles, those we know of and those we may never find out about, that sustain us every day. Yet, we live in the US where there is an official holiday specifically dedicated to the giving of thanks. Some Jews celebrated this day, because it is an official American festivity, others do not because they feel one must equally thank the Almighty every day – even every moment – of one’s existence, rather than once a year on a specific day.

It may be a bit late to start cooking the turkey for this evening, but this is a delicious recipe that can be made at any time, whether for Shabbos, whether for a holy day, or any festive occasion. Lévana in her class, two Mondays ago, featured the following:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup white wine
  • 1 cup maple syrup
  • 2/3 cup Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons ground pepper
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 12-14 pound turkey, frozen OK, at room temperature
  • 4 mackintosh apples, unpeeled, diced
  • 8 thin parsnips, or 4 larger ones, diced
  • 2 large heads fennel, cut into thin wedges
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 3 sprigs sage, leaves only, chopped coarsely

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Mix the wine, maple syrup, mustard, pepper and water in a bowl. Place the turkey breast side down in a (real) baking dish, and pour the mixture over it. Cover the pan loosely with foil, and bake 2 ½ hours. Turn the turkey over, breast side up. Bake uncovered 1 more hour, or a little longer, until the juices of the turkey run clear and the skin looks a nice golden color. Transfer the turkey to a cutting board, and let it rest a few minutes before slicing. Transfer all but 1 cup of the liquid to a saucepan, and reduce them on a high flame until it thickens to the consistency of maple syrup: this is your gravy. You will end up with about 3 cups of gravy. Meanwhile, raise the temperature to 475 degrees. Add the second set of ingredients. Give a good mix to the veggies, and roast about 25 minutes, or a little longer, until very tender and roasted.

Slice the turkey, and place in a platter, with the roasted vegetables all around, and pour the gravy over the turkey and vegetables.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

20
Nov
11

Pecan Pie


Pecan Pie may be a Thanksgiving classic, but it also happens to be a favorite of mine at almost any time. I looked for an easy to make, great tasting recipe and I found this one on one of our must read foodie blogs:

Pecan Pie

Photo by: Irene Saiger from bamitbach.wordpress.com

This recipe was printed in the New York Times many years ago.  It is the only one I use and has never failed me.

  • 1-10″ baked pie shell
  • 1 1/4  cups dark corn syrup
  • 1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/2 stick butter or pareve margarine, melted
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped pecans
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup pecan halves.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Partially bake your pie shell.  Remove and allow to cool.  Combine the corn syrup and sugar in a heavy pan.  Bring to a boil and stir till sugar is dissolved.  Remove from heat and allow to cool.  Beat the eggs in a mixing bowl.  Mix in cooled syrup, melted butter, chopped pecans and vanilla.  Pour into pie shell.  Decorate the top of pie with pecan halves.  Bake for about 50 minutes.  Cover crust with foil to prevent from over-browning.   Serves 10

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

15
Nov
11

Our Next BlogTalkRadio Broadcast


Tomorrow, Wednesday, November 16th, at 8:00 pm (Eastern Time) we will be joined by Costas Mouzouras, Manager of Gotham Wines & Liquors and wine-master par excellence. We will talk about kosher wine and how it evolved from being the industry’s laughingstock to where it’s winning international awards in direct competition with the finest wines from all over the world.

Costas hails from Cyprus, where his grandfather was a winemaker. During summer vacations from school, young Costas would help out in the winery. In 1988 he came to these shores to attend Queens College and shortly after, at a friend’s urging, he took a job at Gotham and he’s been there ever since. He first became the kosher wine buyer, at a time when the choices were very limited. As he advanced in rank – at Gotham – so did the quality and the number of kosher wine selections.

In the second half of our broadcast, at 8:30pm, Alessandra Rovati (Dinner in Venice), Esti Berkowitz,(Primetime Parenting), Kim Amzallag, (Director of Marketing for The Jewish Daily Forward)  and Shoshana Raff (The Kosher Shopaholic) and Roberta Scher (KosherEye), will join me for a discussion on last week’s Kosherfest 2011. What impressed us, what trends became apparent, where the kosher industry might venture next, how the internet is impacting it all; we will cover these topics and more. Please tune us in at BlogTalkRadio.com/ tomorrow at 8:30pm (Eastern Time) for an interesting and informative show. We’ll be wait’n for ya!

CS

11
Nov
11

Kosherfest 2011 Highlights – Part 2


Wednesday, the last day of Kosherfest 2011, proved even more eventful than I expected. Irving Schild and I started the day by interviewing Alain Bankier (from Manischewitz) which you can hear motzey Shabbat at 8:30pm (Eastern Time) on BlogTalkRadio.com.

We then proceeded to cover the 4th Annual Kosherfest Culinary Competition, produced in partnership with the Center for Kosher Culinary Arts (see here, here and here) and sponsored by Jack’s Gourmet.

Shortly after getting there I was asked if I could take over as the third judge because cookbook author, James Beard Award winner and encyclopedist Gil Marks, had an emergency. The pressure started at this point… I had eaten at the various establishments represented and thought each was truly superlative. This was not going to be easy!

(Photos by: Esti Berkowitz of Primetime Parenting
for The Kosher Scene)

From left to right: Emcee Chef Avram Wiseman - Dean of CKCA, Chef Jack Silberstein - from Jack's Gourmet kosher sausages, yours truly and Chef Philippe Kaemmerle from CKCA

Chef Avram, last year’s Kosherfest Culinary Competition winner, more than ably emceed the event with wit and charm intermingled with educational tidbits. The three contestants were (in alphabetical order): Craig Solomon from Ariel’s (18 Engle St  Englewood, NJ 07631; Tel: 201.569.1202)

Chef Craig

Seth Warshaw, from etc steakhouse (1409 Palisade Avenue; Teaneck, NJ 07666; Tel: 201.357.5677)…

Chef Seth

Moshe Wendel from Pardes (497 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, NY, 11217; Tel: 718.797.3880)…

Chef Moshe, rarin' to get started!

Immediately before hitting the clock to allow 45 minutes for cooking and plating, Chef Avram unveiled the secret ingredient…

...Boneless Duck Breast!

Each Chef was allowed to bring something from his restaurant, each one’s individual style shone through as they made three plates each. Chef Solomon showed the gracefulness and precision of a well trained ballet dancer; Chef Warshaw betrayed no nervousness under pressure and was the first one to plate, with over a minute to spare; Chef Wendel, ever the innovator, performed his magic with unusual ingredients.

Chef Craig brought in habanero peppers and sugar cane, Chef Seth used pomegranate – his signature ingredient, while Chef Moshe preferred the exotic. He brought in amba, a tangy Iraqi mango pickle condiment, which he made into a heavy sauce.

The judges walked around to observe each chef in action. We were looking for cleanliness, technique and overall mastery, while Chef Avram periodically announced the countdown and kept the audience entertained throughout. A few minutes before the clock came to a stop the three of us sat down and readied to taste.

First to serve was Chef Seth he presented each of us with a beautiful tower of duck resting over three cornmeal johny or journey cakes. Next came Chef Solomon who showed had he cooked and moved with precision and graceful elegance but his square presentation looked like an architectural masterpiece.  Chef Moshe served a very aromatic duck covered with a generous helping of amba, another beautiful presented very succulent dish as I’d come to expect from him!

...remains of the winning dish

Each dish tasted very different, each showed the consummate professionalism and artistry of its creator. Incredible how the same basic ingredient can be made so differently! It was hard to decide which was best – specially as we tasted in very quick succession washing out our mouths in between each dish. The maximum number of points, per Chef, per judge, was 30 points for a total a grand total of 90. All three were within one or two points away, after a few minutes of deliberation in a back room (where each judge explained the rational for his grading on preparation, presentation and taste) we finally had a winner…

The winner, his silver trophy and $1000.00 in cash

Seth Warshaw from Teaneck’s etc steakhouse!

After the competition we visited with Brigitte Mizrahi, CEO of Anderson International Foods, makers of Sugar River, Les Petites Fermieres, and Natural & Kosher brand cheeses. Sugar River won this year’s Kosherfest Best New Cheese Award. You can hear the interview tomorrow eve.

From there we proceeded to Jack’s Gourmet (see here and here), while I had a pretty good idea (having tasted it at Dr. Broner’s while they were perfecting it, a couple of months ago) why they won this year’s Best New Sausage Award though I still was surprised by how much they had an improved an already delicious recipe. Needless to say, we kept on coming back again and again… As an old TV commercial used to say: Betcha can’t eat just one! Hear the interview with Dr. Broner tomorrow evening.

The wines we tasted at various price points were superb, proving yet again that great wines can be (and are!) kosher. Shortly before leaving, I run into Alex Veyg, from veygsgourmet.com. This young man produces a line of delicious natural flavored honeys and he too will be on our internet radio show, tomorrow eveningmothzey Shabbos – at 8:30 pm (Eastern Time). You will tune us in, won’t you?

CS

10
Nov
11

Kosherfest 2011 Highlights – Part 1


I spent this past Tuesday and Wednesday at the Meadowlands Exposittion Center together with my good friend, successful commercial photographer and former Chair of the Photo Department at Fashion Institute of Technology – Irving Schild. I’ve been to Kosherfest quite a few times and as good as they were this one leaves those before it far in the dust. Not only was it far bigger (more exhibitors), it had far more visitors who were more informed, more health conscious, than ever before.

There were many new and exciting products, that will be hitting the store shelves soon, as well as non-food items that  caught our attention:

Ner Mitzvah - A candlemaker in the shtetl.

This company used a very creative way to show us their line of products, no words were necessary… just good old fashioned candle making.

Argentina, a country right across the river from where I grew up, distinguished itself by having Marumatok snatch the Kosherfest’s Best New Wine of the Year (Fincas Marumatok Cabernet Sauvignon Malbec). Marumatok has a nice line of wines at very reasonable prices, they may be hard to find but are well worth the search!

One of Marumatok's executives talking about the company's wines...

Costa Rica had its own booth promoting kosher travel tours in that country.

Kosher Costa Rica Tours

To me one of the main highlights was a panel discussion with various cookbook authors where new and upcoming trends were discussed:

From left to right (seated) authors: Jeff Nathan, Levana Kirschenbaum, Susie Fishbein, Gil Marks, Jamie Geller (standing) moderators: Leah Schapira and Esti Berkowitz

Various bloggers were allowed to ask questions to the authors, making this an interesting information packed hour.

There were far too many interesting items and products for the scope of this brief post, but we’ll talk about a few more in the 2nd part of this series. Especially worthy of mention, however, is the Best Overall New Product winner: Tishbi Passion Fruit and Strawberry Champagne Preserves. Ora Tishbi truly outdid herself for the second year in a row. I’m not into preserves but these are truly delicious

Seyman once again had an incredible display of superb European cheeses… that Manchego, the Gruyère, the Halumi, the Parmegiano Reggiano… just remembering the taste makes my mouth water and I wasn’t even taking part in a Pavlovian experiment!

The Petrini Gelato Shoppe, introduced a new dimension of flavor. Both their milchig and parve lines were outstanding

The French chocolates from Michel Cluizel, were miniature works of art. Their taste incomparable, far above any other chocolates this chocaholic ever tasted before!

CS

07
Nov
11

Recipes We’ve Enjoyed During the Holy Days – Part 2


During the chagim I prepared quite a few dishes I had not made before, as well as some favorites. It was hard to choose which ones to feature here but these two were simple, delicious and the family absolutely loved them.

Photo from: The Big Book of One Pot

Spiced Bismatu Pilau

(From: The Big Book of One Pot – published by Parragon Books 2008)

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups basmati rice
  • 6 oz broccoli trimmed
  • 6 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 large onions, chopped
  • 8 oz button mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 5 cardamon pods, split
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 8 black peppercorns
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 5 cups boiling vegetable stock or water
  • 1/2 cup seedless raisins
  • 1/2 cup unsalted pistachios, coarsely chopped
  • salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Place the rice in the strainer and wash well under cold running water. Drain. Trim off the broccoli stalk, then quarter the stalk lengthwise and cut diagonally into 1/2″ pieces. Cut the remaining broccoli into small florets.
  2. Heat oil in a large skillet. Add the onions and broccoli stalks, cook over low heat stirring frequently for 3 minutes. Add the mushrooms, rice, garlic, and spices for 1 minute while stirring until rice is coated in oil.
  3. Add the boiling stock and season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the broccoli florets and return the mixture to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat and cook over low heat for 15 without uncovering the pan.
  4. Remove the pan from from the heat and let the pilau stand for 5 minutes without uncovering. Remove the whole spices, add the raisins and pistachios. Gently fork through to fluff up the grains. Serve the pilau hot.

We like rice dishes and this one certainly did not disappoint!

For dessert, I turned to Jeff Nathan’s Family Suppers, (Published by Clarkson Potter, 2005) I’ve made it before and everyone asked for it again:

Photo by: Alan Richardson from Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers

Poached Apricots with Lemon and Thyme

Makes 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 lemons
  • 1/2 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 3-inch cinnamon stick
  • 1 pound dried apricots
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
  • a few gratings of fresh nutmeg
  • vanilla ice cream for serving

Directions

  1. Grate the lemon zest from 1 lemon. Juice this lemon and strain the juice. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest from the second lemon and cut the zest lengthwise into thin strips (julienne) Reserve the second lemon for another use.
  2. Mix 2 cups water, the orange juice, honey, sugar, grated lemon zest, lemon juice, and cinnamon in a medium saucepan. Add the apricots and bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Partially cover the saucepan with the lid, and simmer until the apricots are tender, about 10 minutes.
  3. Remove from the heat and add the thyme and nutmeg. Cool until warm (or cool, cover, and refrigerate until chilled). Serve spooned over ice cream and topped with julienned lemon zest.

Variation: Poached Apricots with Amaretto

In step 3, add 1/4 cup almond flavored liqueur, such as Amaretto di Saronno, to the poaching liquid with the thyme.

As Jeff Nathan says you can serve the apricots without the ice cream as a compote. With everyone having seconds this dessert was gone in no time!

SYR

 

02
Nov
11

Lamb, I Like Lamb!


Before SYR posts the next installment of Recipes We’ve Enjoyed During the Holy Days I just have to share this easy to make but delicious lamb dish, which I found on PetiChef.com

Photo from: petichef.com

Honeyed Welsh Lamb

Serves 6

Ingredients

For the lamb:

  • 4-6 pounds leg of lamb
  • 4 tablespoons of rosemary infused honey
  • 3 sprigs of fresh rosemary
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • Salt and pepper to taste

For the gravy:

  • 3 tablespoons rosemary infused honey
  • 2 tablespoons cold white wine
  • 1 tablespoon corn starch

Directions
Preheat the oven to 400F. Place the lamb in a roasting pan and brush with the honey. Mince one sprig of rosemary and sprinkle it over the lamb along with the minced garlic. Season with salt and pepper. Place the last two sprigs of rosemary over the lamb. Using tinfoil form a tent over the lamb and place it in the oven. Roast for 15 minutes and then reduce the heat to 350F.

Continue roasting for 1-1/2 to 2 hours, estimating about 20 minutes per pound. When there?s approximately 20 minutes of roasting time left, remove the tinfoil from the lamb allowing the skin to brown and crisp. Depending on desired level of doneness, remove the lamb when it reaches about 10 degrees below desired read out on a meat thermometer as the cut will continue to cook as it rests. A temperature of 160F and pink juice indicates the lamb is medium rare.

Remove the lamb from the oven and transfer it from the roasting pan to a plate. Cover it with foil and keep it warm while it rests. Next place the roasting pan on the range. Mix 2 tablespoons of cold white wine with 1 tablespoon of cornstarch. Add the mix to the roasting pan along with 3 T of the honey. Stir together and heat over a low temperature until the liquid reduces by about two-thirds.

Serve the lamb with the gravy, roast potatoes and roast pears.

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 150 minutes

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS




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