Archive for October, 2011

31
Oct
11

Recipes We’ve Enjoyed During the Holy Days – Part 1


I cooked up a storm this season since we’ve had lots of guests at meals meal during the Holy Days. These can, however, be made and enjoyed at any time and they’ll be perfect no matter what the occasion!

Let me start with an appetizer that went over very well:

Sesame Chicken Toasts

Serves 12

Photo from: Simply Southern - With a Dash of Kosher Soul

Ingredients

  • 4 boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • 1 boneless skinless chicken breast half
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 3 green onions, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup chicken broth
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 12-15 slices white sandwich bread, crust removed and cut into 8 triangles
  • 1/2 cup sesame seeds
  • Vegetable oil

Directions

  1. Process chicken in food processor until finely chopped. Add egg, green onion, garlic, cilantro, broth, pepper, and salt. Pulse a few times to mix well.
  2. Scatter sesame seeds onto a plate. Sread a thick layer of chicken mixture over bread pieces. Press spread side into seeds making an even covering.
  3. Heat 1/2 oil in a skillet until hot. Quickly fry triangles for 2-3 minutes on both sides. turning once until golden browned. Drain toasts on paper towels.

Toast may be prepared in advance. Store in refrigerator for 3 days or frozen up to a month. Thaw overninght in refrigerator. Reheat in hot oven for 5 minutes.

Roasted Summer Vegetables

(Adapted from The Big Book of One Pot)

Serves 4

Photo from: The Big Book of One Pot

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 fennel bulb, cut into wedges
  • 2 red onions, cut into wedges
  • 2 beefsteak tomatoes, cut into wedges
  • 1 eggplant, thickly sliced
  • 2 zucchini, thickly sliced
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, seeded and cut into chunks
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into chunks
  • 1 orange bell pepper, seeded and cut into chunks
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 4 fresh rosemary sprigs
  • ground black pepper
  • crusty bread, to serve

Directions

  1. Brush an ovenproof dish with a little oil. Arrange the fennel, onions, tomatoes, eggplant, zucchini and bell peppers in the dish and tuck the garlic cloves and rosemary sprigs among them.Drizzle with the remaining oil and season to taste with pepper.
  2. Roast the vegetables in a preheated oven at 400 F, for 10 minutes. Turn the vegetables over, return the dish to the oven and roast for another 10-15 minutes or until the vegetables are tender and beginning to turn golden brown.
  3. Serve the vegetables straight from the dish or transfer to a warm serving platter. Serve immediately, with crusty bread to soak up the juices.

(Adapted from: The Big Book of One Pot. When I made this dish I tripled it, as we had 11 people at the particular meal).

My guests were very pleased with the above dishes, I hope you will enjoy as well.

SYR

18
Oct
11

Hoshana Rabbah and Shemini Atzeres


[Reposted from last year. CS]

On Hoshana Rabbah the chazan or the sheliach tzibbur dons a white kitl as he does on Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur… The Zohar on Vayehi 120a and Terumah 142a tells us that that while we are all judged on Yom Kippur the verdict is not handed down until Shemini Atzeret, but our last chance to do tshuvah is on Hoshana Rabboh

At the end of each of the seven rounds of circling the bet haknesset we stop to hear the blowing of the shofar… This is not one of the Days of Awe yet there are tremendous similarities in the ritual. CHaZa”L never referred to this day as being a Day of Judgment, yet there is a strong hint to back up the Zohar‘s assertion in the fact that in the days of the Temple the sacrifices corresponding to the Days of Judgment and Shmini Atzeret were the same. Some Mahzorim attested to the special status of Hoshana Rabbah in the High Holy Days prayer U-netaneh Tokef, having the following version: “On Rosh ha-Shanah judgment is made, and on Yom Kippur it is written, and on Hoshanah Rabbah it is sealed.” In Romania it was customary to add some other Yamim Nora’im prayers as well to the Amidah for Shemini Atzeret.

Photo by: Yuval Nadav

Professor Yosef Tabori from Bar-Ilan University’s Talmud Department tells us:

Perhaps the closest connection drawn between the Yamim Noraim and Sukkot is found in the motif of the lulav. In antiquity, waving a branch on high was considered a sign of victory. The Sages interpreted our waving of the lulav on Sukkot as signifying the victory of the Jews over Satan on the Days of Judgment that precede the festival. They interpreted the words “delights are ever in Your right hand” (Ps. 16:11) as indicating that a person holding the Four Kinds in his right hand is showing that he emerged victorious on the Day of Judgment (Vayyiqra Rabbah 30.2). One of the earlier sources describing the special status of Hoshanah Rabbah in the synagogue uses this victory imagery:

When Hoshanah Rabbah comes they take willows, and make seven circuits around the synagogue, while the Hazzan of the synagogue stands like an angel of G-d, holding a Torah scroll in his arms as the people march around him as around the altar. For thus our Rabbis taught: every day it was customary to circle the altar reciting, “Please, O Lord, deliver us; please, O Lord, bring success,” and on the seventh day they would march around seven times, as King David said explicitly, as it is written, “I wash my hands in innocence, and walk around Your altar” (Ps. 26:6). Immediately the ministering angels rejoice and proclaim, “the people of Israel are victorious.” (Midrash Tehillim, Buber ed., 17.5)

[..]Thus, the entire period between Rosh ha-Shanah and the last day of Sukkot is a period during which one can still affect the verdict on rain for the better. According to a tradition ascribed to Rabbenu Tam, those who insist on reading the haftarah of Shuvah Yisrael on the Sabbath between Rosh ha-Shanah and Yom Kippur are making a mistake, since this haftarah was set for the Sabbath before Sukkot. The reason is that “Shuvah (Hosea 14:2-10) is directed towards praying for rain, since we conclude [the haftara] with a passage from Joel [the reading, Joel 2:15-27, sounds like an assemblage for prayers for rain and includes the verse "For He has given you the early rain in kindness"] and on Sukkot judgment is passed for the rain, and they are proclaimed before the judges[mentioned in Joel 2:16]” (Mahzor Vitri, p. 224).

In conclusion, even though we are especially enjoined to rejoice during the festival of Sukkot, we must not forget that we are in the process of being judged concerning the rain.

I pray that each one of us has indeed emerged victorious, may this year be one blessed with everything each of us truly needs. May it be a year of health, prosperity, and happiness; may it be a year with no tears, except for tears of joy. May this be the year when peace breaks out triumphant both on a global as well as on each individual’s level!

CS

11
Oct
11

Sukkot Wine Pairing


[I have the pleasure of introducing you to my good friend Jeff Ingber. He lives in Providence, RI. A trained Chef and graduate from Johnson and Wales in RI, one of America's top culinary schools, Jeff graciously agreed to share his menus and pairings. CS]

Rosh Hashanah is behind us and most of us Jewish households here in the North East are preparing to dine “al fresco” for a week, while enjoying good company in the Sukkah.  The change in temperature and the observance of the holiday offer us a chance to snuggle up to some bigger and bolder wines on these cooler nights. For over 20 years now here in Providence, people have long anticipated seeing and tasting what wine gems would be served in my Sukkah.

At the beginning of the Israeli Wine Revolution, I was still a student in college. I remember traveling to New Jersey on Sundays to pick up as many varietals of Kosher Wine I could get my hands on, at a store in Teaneck. I would arrive at 11:00am and the clerk would remind me that I could not complete a purchase until after 12:00 in Bergen County. I do not think she knew I had just driven 175 miles and 10 more minutes would not kill me.

Today, I manage a small Wine Store that is located inside my children’s school.  Yes, that is not a typo.  We are the largest retailer of kosher wine in Southern New England.  We carry over 100 labels and sell over 500 cases a year.

This morning I reviewed my menus to ensure some great pairings.

I am not a huge fan of wasting print with personal reviews. It is too refined a process for me.

I have become a huge fan of kosher wines coming out of Spain and Argentina.  Israel is running right behind them.  I try to do my pairing at this time of year with those countries offerings in mind so here goes.

Over the next 1o days or so I will be serving the following:

Stuffed Chicken Breasts with Chorizo and Jicama……….. Elvi Adar (Spain)

Arugula Salad with Sweet Potato Crisps and Dried Cranberries……….. Capçanes Peraj Petita (Spain)

Grilled Asparagus with Roasted Garlic Slivers……….. Arco Nuevo Shiraz (Argentina) $9.

Garlic Soup……….. I must say, this is a good time for my favorite Bourbon.  (Willet’s or W. H Harrison)

Jeff Ingber showing one of his catches

Black Sea Bass Ceviche (I catch it myself)……….. Barkan Classic Pinotage OR Carmel Shaal Gewürztraminer  (Israel)

Grilled Southwestern Style Salmon……….. Flecha De Los Andes Gran Malbec (Argentina)

Chicken with Apple and Fig Chutney……….. Or Haganuz Amukah (Israel)

Chicken with Roasted Sweet Chilies and Cilantro……….. Segal’s Single Vineyard, Dovev, Merlot (Israel)

I know , this is a wine Blog not a food blog but it is important to know what we are pairing with here.

There are many other super wines for the season.   Wines from the Dalton Winery like their Shiraz or Tepperberg Meritage a big and bold are just the thing on these cooler nights to keep your senses on high alert. Other great wines like Bynyamina’s Yogev  Cabernet Zinfandel blend or Binyamina Choshen label Ruby Syrah are dancing with a mouthful of Mediterranean flavors of mineral dark fruit.  Elvi’s EL26 Priorat and Ramon  Cordova Rioja remind you that you can sit in the sukkah with tapas, fine wine and great friends for a night under the stars. And, as my wife walks by and takes a look at my musings, she reminds me that Baron Herzog’s Late Harvest Chenin Blanc is her favorite accompaniment to fresh berries and custard. These wines are all in the $7.00 t0 $28.00 range, except for the bourbons which are around $40.00 Everyone can get in on the season of rejoicing!!!

Jeff Ingber

11
Oct
11

Food and Sukkot


While there are no specific dishes associated with Sukkot, some lend themselves better to the sometimes chilly weather we are experiencing these days. The aromas, the warmth they evoke are just perfect for eating in the Sukkah. So, here is a superb recipe by one of New York’s favorite chefs, Jeff Nathan of Abigael’s on Broadway:

Photo by: Alison Nathan

Jeff Nathan’s
Tarragon Salmon Fillets with Vegetable Ragout

Dairy — Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided (2 tablespoons chilled)
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground fennel seed, optional
  • 5 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems discarded, caps sliced
  • 4 ounces sugar snap peas, trimmed
  • 1/2 pint grape tomatoes or halved cherry tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup Vegetable Broth
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh tarragon
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 4 7 to 8-ounce salmon fillets, skinned
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Position a broiler rack about 6 inches from the source of heat and preheat the broiler.
  2. To make the ragout, melt the butter with the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and fennel and cook, stirring often, until garlic gives off its aroma, about 1 minute. Add the shiitakes and cook, stirring occasionally, until they give off their juices, about 4 minutes. Stir in the sugar snap peas and cook for 1 minute. Add the tomatoes, broth, lemon juice, and tarragon. Bring the broth to a simmer. Cook, stirring often, until the tomatoes are heated through, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat, partially cover with a lid, and keep warm
  3. Meanwhile, brush the salmon on both sides with the oil, sprinkle with the tarragon, and season with salt and pepper. Oil the broiler rack. Broil the fish, skin sides up, for 3 minutes. Turn and continue broiling until the fish is opaque in the center with a tinge of rose color when prodded with the tip of a sharp knife, about 5 minutes more for medium-rare salmon. Place each salmon fillet on a dinner plate.
  4. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons chilled butter, cut into bits, to the vegetables. Stir with a wooden spoon, being careful not to break up the vegetables, to melt the butter. Season the ragout with salt and pepper. Spoon the ragout over the salmon and serve immediately.

Enjoy, gentle reader enjoy!

CS

07
Oct
11

Who will Live, Who will Die


On October 8, 2008, I posted the following on my political blog:

Fasting and praying at the Kotel on Yom Kippur. Photo from: http://www.independent.co.uk/

Who Will Live, Who Will Die

This evening starts the holiest, most solemn day in the Jewish calendar – Yom Kippur. Ten days earlier, the first of the two days of Rosh Hashana – the Hebrew New Year – marked the day, when according to the Jewish tradition everyone’s fate for the coming year is inscribed in the Heavenly ledgers. Yom Kippur is the day when whatever was written stays as is or is changed, but in either case fate becomes sealed.

In one of the most awe inspiring prayers of the day, Jews intone theses words: …mi ychie umi yamut (who will live and who will die)… mi bamayim umi ba’esh (who by water and who by fire… who will become impoverished and who will be rich… Many take these words literally and, as you can imagine, after hours of praying the tears often flow freely as these sentences are reached. But there is also an alternate interpretation. Based on what? At the end of this specific prayer, everyone announces at the top of their voice: uTshuvah, uTfilah, uTzdakah ma’avirin et ro’a hagzerah! (And Repentance, and Prayer, and Charity remove the negative Judgment!). The question then becomes, how is it possible that the Infinite, Almighty God allows Himself to be swayed by a mere mortal? If He is the beginning and the end (in other words, time in our human terms does not apply to Him as what we perceive as past, present and future all unfold simultaneously before Him), if He is the All-Knowing and understands that in spite of broken hearts and full sincere repentance, the next morning we find ourselves again doing the same deeds, having the same thoughts, feeling the same lusts and jealousies, how can He possibly allow our temporary repentance to change His mind?

The answer was given by the Sages of the Talmud when they taught that even with the sword at one’s throat, a person should not give up hope. It means that in these Days of Awe we are assigned a specific fate which, as a mark of Cain, shows what may become of us. It means that by truly mending our ways we become worthy of a different fate because we are longer the same person, it means that only our actions, our thoughts and the effort we expend to overcome our negative passions will remove the specific mark.

As we look around the world, between the current economic meltdown and the forces that wish to destroy the West… the horizon looks rather bleak. Evil seems to be ascendant, the western nations are plagued by the cancer within, wittingly or unwittingly, working for their destruction. Western politicians of every political stripe, are guilty of the current situation whether for personal gain, for personal glory or merely because of absolutely naive misguidance. The world, as we know it, is marked for a major conflagration, but we may not despair, we can not relax our stand against those who would destroy us. As we westerners bear the mark, so do our enemies! If we just sit back with folded arms groping our way in the shadows, confused by the darkness surrounding us, the mark will surely become our fate. If we rise above our confusion, if we recover our lost spiritual values and shed the cynicism, the dark shadows will dissipate. That new light will bring hope, hope will translate into resolve, resolve will become strength and raise us from this stupor. We will then, with renewed vigor, as new different people, rise up against the enemy within and without. The mark of Cain will dissipate and a new era of health, prosperity and general wellbeing will replace it. Is the West up to the task or will the mark of Cain become final?

 

G’mar Chatima Tova!

 

CS

07
Oct
11

Yeshiva University Museum – Part 2


Graphical Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish WomenAugust 14, 2011 – April 15, 2012

Jews were among the pioneers of the comics genre. Superman, created in 1932 by writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster, started the superhero character and established its supremacy in the mainstream comic book market. Seventy nine years after its creation, Superman still fights the never ending battle for Truth, Justice and the American Way. This past May it placed first on Imagine Game NetworksTop 100 Comic Book Heroes.

Superman has fascinated scholars, cultural observers, commentators and critics who have explored the character’s impact  in the United States and around the world. Even Italy’s renowned novelist,  university professor Umberto Eco discusses the mythic qualities of the character.

In 1952 a new type of comic joined the mainstream when editor Harvey Kurtzman and publisher William Gaines launched MAD, first as a comic book and then as a magazine. Widely imitated and influential, it impacted the satirical media as well as the entire cultural landscape of the 20th century.

Jews continued to break new ground in the comic book genre and in 1976 Harvey Pekar started writing (with the assistance of various artists, most notably Robert Crumb, Aline Kominski-Crumb‘s husband and sometime collaborator) a series of autobiographical comic books under the title American Splendor.

Starting out with a three page strip in Funny Animals (an underground comic published by Apex Novelties) it took Art Spiegelman 13 years to complete Maus, a Survivor’s Tale. It was published in 2 volumes, the first in 1986 and the second in 1991; in 1992 it became the only comic or graphic novel ever to win the Pulitzer Prize!

While mainstream comics were read mostly for escapism and satire, underground comics reflected a bit more of the real everyday world we live in, yet both remained men’s realms until 1972 when Wimmen’s Commix made its appearance. A  core of its contributors, including the first editor (Trina Robbins), were Jewish. As comics evolved with the times; women started ascribing personal, confessional sides to their characters, including health issues, intimate moments, and emotive reflections on parents, family and the world around them.

Catholics had the confessional box with the forgiving priest at the ready but Jewish women had visceral needs to publicly air their clothesline of examined, analyzed, dissected attitudes, and guilt ridden deeds. This exhibit, Graphical Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women at the Yeshiva University Museum substantiates that.

Eighteen artists are represented here, some with almost four decades in the field. They are:

One of the showcases…

  • Aline Kominsky-Crumb                                            
  • Vanessa Davis
  • Bernice Eisenstein
  • Sarah Glidden
  • Miriam Katin
  • Miss Lasko-Gross
  • Miriam Libicki
  • Corinne Pearlman
  • Sarah Lightman
  • Sara Lazarovic
  • Diane Noomin
  • Trina Robbins
  • Rachel Rottner
  • Sharon Rudahl
  • Laurie Sandell
  • Ariel Schrag
  • Lauren Weinstein
  • Ilana Ziffren
A sampling of the graphic books published by these artists...

A sampling of the books published by the artists represented in this exhibit

Drawing styles vary greatly, including some with very marked influences by MAD Magazine‘s artists and others. Subject matter ranges from “coming of age” stories, to  heartbreak over miscarriages, to attitudes in the Israeli Army;  all share bluntness mixed with inescapable vulnerability. Going through the exhibit – as a proudly frum male – I was sometimes discomfited by the naked lack of subtlety in getting to the heart of the matter. Considering, that we live in the age of Androids and iPhones, where we have but a few seconds to catch the viewer’s attention, these women artists are remarkably adept at making their public statements with overt clarity. Some artists peeled layer after layer in their onion-skinned confessional revealing startling beauty and depth of core amidst the unprettiness they expose.

There is almost nothing in the whole exhibit that is of a religious nature, and when religion is discussed it is not done in favorable terms.

Having spent my undergraduate years at Yeshiva University, I couldn’t help but wonder why my alma mater‘s museum would present this exhibit… But when I suddenly thought back to my own pudgy, awkward, teenage self in Uruguay where, falling prey to the constant taunting of fast running bullies, I steadfastly kept a journal recording my most private thoughts and feelings, confessing insecurities, and the emotional upheaval of my youth, I remembered what a cathartic therapeutic process it turned out to be. I truly believe there is a need to give voice to these artists who represent an important facet of American Jewish culture. They, however nonreligious, are included in what our sages taught us “Kol Yisrael achim, arevim zeh lazeh – All Jews are brothers and are responsible for one another;” are we not also collectively responsible to exhibit the hurt, pain and alienation that these women feel? This exhibit exposes the subtle souls of the artists who through language and the drawing of  their various frames cannot help but reflect their Jewishness and the spiritual healing they crave. Should not the Yeshiva University Museum be a partner to that healing?

This exhibit may not be everybody’s cup of tea but it is more than worth seeing, precisely because it will disturb and cause us to reflect on what it reveals about the artists and about ourselves.

CS

RELATED POSTS

Yeshiva University Museum – Part 1

05
Oct
11

Yeshiva University Museum – Part 1


Yesterday I visited the Yeshiva University Museum and was given a tour of the current exhibits by Assistant Curator Zachary Paul Levine. The Museum is housed at the Center for Jewish History (15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011).

Center for Jewish History Photo from Citysearch.com

CJH (an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution) is home to five institutions: American Jewish History Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, all five present interesting exhibits and programs of interest to every Jew, all five boast impressive collections of historical, artistic and cultural items.

Three exhibits are, at present, running concurrently at the Yeshiva University Museum; these are: Jews on Vinyl (July 24, 2011 – January 8, 2012), Prophecy of Place: Quintan Ana Wikswo (August 14, 2011 – January 22, 2012) and Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women (September 25, 2011 – April 15, 2012).

Jews on Vinyl brought back many memories and some nice surprises as I listened to some of my long forgotten favorites of the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s and was pleasantly surprised and touched by some non Jews singing Kol Nidre, Eli Eli or Mein Yiddische Mamme. Yes, folks, you can listen to some highlights of the LP collection, they will delight you, they will surprise you, they will touch you and even make you want to dance!

Powerful, haunting, dream like...

I was touched by this very different photo exhibit. As the press release says:

Wikswo uses damaged and salvaged antique military cameras and battlefield typewriters to explore the startling ecological beauty that obscures “traumatized” sites of crimes against humanity, and to uncover the intergenerational legacies surrounding them. These fiercely mysterious images and starkly graceful prose poems create a powerful encounter with violence and beauty revealed through a fractured, unsettling lens.

Created between 2008-2011 in Portugal, Spain, France, Germany, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Finland and Russia, Prophecy of Place presents kaleidoscopic portraits of the astonishing and often invisible histories hidden at the heart of communities where Jews encountered exile, shelter and trauma.

Traversing 10 centuries, eight countries and five languages, the exhibition is a deeply immersive engagement with the legacy of Jewish survival and the struggle with other cultures through luminous, prismatic, multi-part contemporary photographs of villages, cities, shtetls and camps – sites where Jews have faced devastating attacks or attempts at cultural annihilation.

Some images make it hard to imagine the horrors Jews in these places once experienced, yet the poetry, subtly, makes it clear. Without minimizing the evil, Quintan Ana Wikswo‘s words give hope while making us aware of the terror.  She gives a voice to all the nameless Jews tortured and murdered, whose cries can never be heard, whose names have long been forgotten. As I looked at these unsettling images, as I read some of her accompanying prose poems, every unheeded cry somehow pierced my heart, every tear seared it. But… you will not see any image depicting the pain, the brutality, the fear, the death…

Well worth a visit, gentle reader!

CS

RELATED POSTS

Yeshiva University Museum – Part 2

03
Oct
11

The Contests, so Far…


Because of many requests, we’ve extended our contests until October 31st. On the Jack’s Gourmet Contest, we are giving away $100.00 worth of Jack’s Gourmet Kosher sausages plus a Jack’s Gourmet baseball cap.

Jack's Gourmet is giving $100.00 in all 5 varieties of their sausages, plus a Jack's Gourmet baseball cap

What do you have to do to win all these? How about sending us your best recipes using Jack’s Gourmet kosher sausages. The contest runs through October 31st, winner will be chosen by Chef Jack Silberstein and Dr. Alan Bronner (Jack’s Gourmet owners) and will be announced on these pages on Monday November 14. send in your recipes to kosherscene@gmail.com. If you care to accompany your entry with a good photo of the finished dish, we’ll feature it right here on our blog. To get an idea of what we are looking for go here, if you scroll down to the bottom of the page you’ll find some interesting recipes, including two of our own.

So far we’ve received 21 recipes ranging from less than mediocre to delicious and creative. We extended the contest as you, gentle reader, requested; why don’t you send those recipes? Show us your creativity!

As for our other contest, don’t forget to send us in your ideas for avoiding the back to school blues to: kosherscene@gmail.com. Why not send us photos of unusual and interesting lunchboxes?

We will publish the best photos and ideas and pick a winner who will receive:

  • 1 carton of juice boxes
  • 1 dozen assorted fruit roll-ups
  • 1 lunch box

Keep those recipes and ideas coming, gentle reader, get to work!

CS




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