Archive for August, 2011

31
Aug
11

EXTRA, EXTRA! Contest, Contest!!!


Starting today and running until September 20, one of you – gentle readers – will have the chance to win 2 Jack’s Gourmet Variety Packs ($100.00 value)…

and a Jack’s Gourmet cap…

What do you have to do to win all these? How about sending us your best recipes using Jack’s Gourmet. sausages. The contest runs through September 20th, winner will be chosen by Chef Jack Silberstein and Dr. Alan Bronner (Jack’s Gourmet owners) and will be announced on these pages on Monday October 3rd. send in your recipes to kosherscene@gmail.com. If you care to accompany your entry with a good photo of the finished dish, we’ll feature it right here on our blog. To get an idea of what we are looking for go here, if you scroll down to the bottom of the page you’ll find some interesting recipes, including two of our own.

Meanwhile don’t forget to send us in your ideas for avoiding the back to school blues to: kosherscene@gmail.com. Why not send us photos of unusual and interesting lunchboxes.

We will publish the best photos and ideas and pick a winner who will receive:

  • 1 carton of juice boxes
  • 1 dozen assorted fruit roll-ups
  • 1 lunch box

Keep those recipes and ideas coming, gentle reader. get to work!

CS

29
Aug
11

Green Tea


Green Tea, originally from China, is making fast inroads in the West where black tea is traditionally consumed. Many scientific studies have been made to determine the truth of its oft claimed health benefits. There seems to be a correlation between regular tea drinking and a lower rate of heart disease and tea may even stimulate fat oxidation, while boosting the metabolic rate by as much as 4% without raising the heart rate.

Why are we posting about green tea, which we’ve mentioned before on these pages? We received quite a few emails asking for a Green Tea Cake recipe, after looking at various posts throughout the blogosphere we settled for this one (it sounds interesting and delicious!). Found it on the Dessert First blog:

Photo by: Pastrygirl, from Dessert First blog

Green Tea Cake with Red Bean Filling

Green Tea Genoise

2 eggs, room temperature
2 ¼ oz confectioners’ sugar
2 ¼ oz ground almonds
1 tsp matcha powder [powdered green tea]
1 oz all purpose flour
2 egg whites, room temperature
1/8 tsp cream of tartar
1 oz sugar
½ oz butter, melted [substitute margarine to keep it parve]

Red Bean Filling

1 cup heavy cream
6 ounces red beans

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a half sheet pan (about 12″x16″) with a sheet of parchment paper or a Silpat.

Combine the eggs with the confectioners’ sugar and ground almonds in a mixer until cream-colored and light.

Add in the matcha powder and combine. You can add more or less depending on your taste, but don’t add more than 1 ½ tsp or it might affect the cake’s texture.

Remove from the mixer. Sift the flour over the egg mixture.

Whip the egg whites in a clean bowl on a mixer at low speed until they start to froth. Then add the cream of tartar and increase mixer speed, whipping until stiff peaks form. Add the sugar and whip for a few seconds longer to incorporate.

Scoop about 1/3 of the egg whites into the egg mixture and fold in gently with a rubber spatula. Add the remaining egg whites and fold in until uniformly mixed. Pour the melted butter over the batter and fold in to incorporate.

Pour the batter into the half sheet pan and distribute it evenly with an offset spatula, making the layer as level and smooth as possible.

Bake in the oven for about 6 to 8 minutes, until the cake is just firm and lightly brown but not completely brown as this cake should not be over-baked.

Remove from the oven and run a knife around the edges of the cake to loosen it. Slide the cake off the sheet pan and onto a wire rack to cool. When the cake is no longer hot but still warm, place another rack or sheet pan on top of the cake and flip it over, then carefully peel the parchment paper from the cake to prevent it from sticking to the cake. You can place the parchment paper clean side down or a clean Silpat onto the cake, then flip it back over to finish cooling.

When you are ready to assemble the cake, trim off the edges and slice the cake in half along the short side, then cut each piece in half along the long side so you get four 6″x8″ pieces.

Whip the cream to soft peaks. Fold in the red beans gently with a rubber spatula until they are evenly distributed; the cream may take on a light reddish tint.

Place cake layer on a covered cake round and frost the top with a quarter of the whipped cream. It’s ok if some of the cream goes over the sides; just try to keep the layer even.

Cover with a cake layer and frost the top with a third of the remaining whipped cream. Repeat until you have assembled all four layers of cake.

Cover the cake and refrigerate overnight.

When you are ready to serve, trim off the sides of the cake to make them nice and even.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

25
Aug
11

Cioppino


This past Monday eve, SYR and I attended Lévana‘s Dinner and a Show: Light Italian Feast. As usual it was enjoyable, educational and absolutely DELICIOUS! Certainly one of the best cooking classes I’ve ever attended.

We especially liked the Cioppino and Lévana graciously allowed us to post her recipe:

Cioppino

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 4 ribs celery, peeled
  • 2 red peppers
  • 1 large onion, quartered
  • 1 fennel bulb, quartered, centers removed, sliced-thin
  • 3 leeks, darkest parts removed
  • 1 large can (28 oz.) crushed tomatoes
  • 2 cups dry white wine
  • 6 cups water
  • 6 bay leaves, or 1 teaspoon ground
  • 2 good pinches saffron
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 tablespoon anise and fennel seeds
  • Good pinch cloves
  • Good pinch red pepper flakes
  • 2 2-ounce can anchovies, drained and rinsed
  • 1 side salmon (about 3 pounds), cut in large cubes
  • 1 pound flaked mock crab
  • 1 large bunch flat parsley, minced

Directions

Heat the oil in a heavy wide bottom pot. In a food processor coarsely grind the garlic, celery, pepper and onion. Add the ground mixture to the pot, with the leeks, and sautè until translucent. Reduce to medium and cook for 30 minutes. Add the fish and parsley and cook just 5 more minutes. Ladle into soup bowls, and serve with good toasted bread or croutons.

Though it took me more 60 years to even taste fish, I can assure you (as does, SYR) that these was an incredibly tasty soup with a rich array of subtle flavors. Considering the ingredients… I can actually say…. it’s good for you, as well!

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

24
Aug
11

Leah Schapira from CookKosher.com


Our guest this evening (at 8:00pm Eastern Daylight Time) on The Kosher Scene Radio Show, will be Leah Schapira. Not only is her site cookkosher.com a work in progress, but so is she.  Her site best describes her accomplishment concisely, thus:

She has co-authored the popular kosher Silver Spoon cookbook, acted as Food Editor for Mishpacha magazine from 2007-20010 and is currently Senior Food Editor for Ami magazine. Her new cookbook is due December 2011.

cookkosher.com is an attractive and informative with good food photography, that makes your mouth water in anticipation. Leah Shapira is a foodie who’s told other interviewers she’d rather have a new recipe than a new pair of shoes. Unusual lady, indeed!

Browsing through her site, reading her prior interviews, makes it very obvious that her love for creating new dishes and feeding others, are innate parts of her mental and emotional make up.

French Roast with Caramelized Sugar - Photo from: cookkosher.com

Leah will talk to us this evening about her upcoming cookbook, her website and what it offers, she will also share some anecdotes that will help us better understand the person behind the voice on on this BlogTalkRadio.com conversation.

Applesauce - Photo from cookkosher.com

If you missed last week’s great show with Shoshanna Raff from koshershopaholic.com you can hear it here

Please, don’t forget to tune us in this evening’s for our conversation with the charming, Leah Schapira, at 8:00pm (Eastern Time). I know you will enjoy this segment! We’ll be wait’n for ya…

CS

23
Aug
11

Coffee Liqueur


Making your own infused liqueurs is not only simple, it produces delicious results and the combinations are only limited by your imagination. One of my favorites is Coffee Liqueur, which I use as an ingredient for various recipes and drinks. Coffee Liqueur, according to legend, was first made somewhere in the Caribbean during 17th century when someone accidentally spilled rum into their coffee… Hopefully it was not at breakfast time!

Coffee Liqueur

Ingredients

  • 750 ml of either: vodka, rum, brandy, or cognac
  • 1 cup instant coffee powder
  • 2 1/4 cups maple syrup
Directions
  1. Decant the 750ml of liquor into a 2 quart glass container, with a tight fitting lid.
  2. Add the coffee powder to the container and stir to combine. Allow for infusion while keeping the container away from sunlight in a cool place for a month; shake it three times a week.
  3. When the intensity of flavor meets your taste. strain liqueur through a coffee filter into a bowl. Discard any solids.
  4. Add the maple syrup to taste.
  5. Pour the liqueur into a bottle. Age for one month away from light and heat.
Adding two teaspoons of vanilla extract with the coffee powder will smooth out the flavor.
I recently found this easy recipe for a delicious barbeque sauce made with Coffee Liqueur on Food.com

Photo from: handyrecipes.com

Coffee Liqueur Barbecue Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 3 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 1 cup mashed banana
  • 1 tablespoon grated horseradish
  • 1 cup orange blossom honey
  • 1 cup aged balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 6 ounces espresso (4 shots)
  • 1/2 cup coffee liqueur

Directions

  1. In a medium saucepan over medium heat cook garlic for 2 minutes, stirring constantly.
  2. Add remaining ingredients.
  3. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring often.
  4. Remove from heat and cool for 30 minutes.
  5. Pour into a blender and puree to smooth.

I sometimes add a 1/4 teaspoon of dried crushed red pepper to add some extra flavor

I’ve been making the coffee liqueur for a number of years and find that it’s every bit as good as the major brands (which are getting harder to find kosher). I tried the barbeque sauce a few times with chicken, this summer, and found it absolutely delectable.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!

CS

22
Aug
11

Chef Haim Dadi – The Dream Concrete


Since he was very young, Haim Dadi knew what he wanted to do. His parents had a restaurant in Israel and whenever he visited their place – as a child – he loved the hustle and bustle, the aromas, the sounds of the patrons.  He is currently Chef/Partner of 18 Restaurant on 81st Street and 2nd Avenue. I’ve watched and followed him through every area of his restaurant and – as amiable as he is outside the cooking area – it is in the kitchen that he truly comes alive as he cooks, as he talks to his staff, as he experiments with more delicious ways of preparing his fare.

I spoke to Chef Haim recently to find out what makes him tick, what it is that spurs him on. Twenty five years ago he opened his first restaurant in Beersheva with his brother, serving mostly shawarma and a few other grilled items. Three years later, he arrived in New York and opened his first venture in Forest Hills – Tel Aviv Haktanah, though very successful he did not get along with his partner.

He left for a place in Manhattan called Shelanu, which eventually evolved into Mr. Broadway. It started out with a limited Israeli menu, yet considering the demographics in and around its location, it did not work too well. Over a period of seven years they slowly introduced various new types: deli, Chinese, shawarma and sushi. With the addition of all those cuisines Mr. Broadway, soon had one of the largest menus in Manhattan. With very moderate prices and the rich selection they expanded over the years and became a very successful venture, a fixture of the New York kosher Scene.

About a year ago, Chef Dadi was ready for bigger challenges. Together with Sidney Cohen he opened up 18 Restaurant on the premises of what used to be the high end Turquoise. In spite of the high quality of its servings, Turquoise had become a victim of the new recession.

Walking into 18, with its turquoise wall and aquarium, opposite an antiqued stone wall and red fixtures, gives the impression of an upscale expensive place. A quick look, however, at the menu immediately dispels the notion of “expensive.” The food served here is of higher quality than at his former place and in the year since they’ve opened they managed to gather a faithful following that fills the restaurant every day at lunch and dinner. The sushi is superb, and coming from someone who never touched fish until two years ago, someone who never thought he’d ever taste sushi, you can take it as very high praise indeed. I can never resist ordering Chef Haim’s Yemenite Meat Soup, or his juicy hamburgers. He doesn’t serve exotic dishes, instead he specializes in a wholesome array including Eastern European, Mediterranean, sushi and deli selections. He envisions 18 as a purveyor of high quality food at reasonable prices and… the concept works!

As a young child, Haim Dadi had a dream; as a man, he’s made the dream concrete!

CS

19
Aug
11

Keeping the Summer Spirit Alive


One of the finest joys of being a mom was the rekindling of my own inner child engaged in playful delighted interactions with my very own offspring. Shedding adult-induced inhibitions was so freeing! My son and I could sing silly songs together out loud, impersonate outrageous characters, make up our own outlandish stories engaging toys and objects in the room, as available props for fantasy enhancement.

We fought imaginary battles – where we were always the victor, danced in the rain and danced around the house; we’d create parties for no reason other than for the sheer joy of doing so; we’d belly laugh together and had tickle fests and pillow fights. We’d go for walks observing ant activity, bird behavior, cloud formation, whisperings of the wind and the trees, walked the beach and salt marshes watching the mysterious miracle of the seasonal change as my son blossomed with the seasons of his own personal growth and development. I was his hero and teacher and he was mine.

The acquisition of knowledge was a natural extension of my child’s innate curiosity and interest in exploring the world around him. He gained confidence from his explorations, self- correcting the various mishaps and falls with loving encouragement and guidance as he moved through his developmental stages. Early childhood educators reigned in the wildness, fostering cooperation within a group setting, while still respecting the inner spirit of my child’s natural inquisitiveness. And then, this gradual erosive stripping of natural wonder and delight started to occur as the formal structure of school environment and heavy – yeshiva studies followed by secular subjects – curriculum began to bear down on my young son. The rules, regulations and requirements became so constricting, the pressures to conform to the model of the perfect student were enormous.

The challenge for me as a parent was to preserve the happy, creative, naturally inquisitive child and his unique holistic relationship for acquiring knowledge without suffocating his uniqueness and his creative juices. It wasn’t easy by any means! The day-in-day-out school drudgery of homework, long days as shut-ins following inane rules along the painful path to maturity, brain cell dendrite growth, wearing sorting hats of meaningful and disposable knowledge bytes exacted by towing-the-line-compliance to grown-ups and powers that be, made preserving the joys of being a child quite a challenge.

Summer became the primary time of renewal, saying goodbye to summer was truly a bummer. One of my big jobs, as mom, was to keep the spirit of summer alive throughout the year wherever possible in my child and in myself, as well.

Photo by: Man of the House blog

I made work fun, whenever feasible, both for myself and for my son. From simple rewards to making games out of test prep, to offering perks, infusing enthusiasm, creativity and humor throughout our after-school interactions. I’d try to throw in some physical activity with my son; playing ball, shooting some hoops, jumping up and down while reciting the times tables or other factoids he needed to learn; anything that helped change the routine while lightening the tensions of his day. I’d try to slow the pace down a couple notches, even lower the sound decibels a bit, and encouraged him to change into comfy clothes and eat a snack before confronting homework. We’d take breaks for fun while doing school work. I learned, later, about research showing that after 20 minutes of study, the brain works better with a 5 minute break.

We would continue to do fun things as a family, it didn’t have to be elaborate, it didn’t even have to be outdoors, although airing out the children briefly each day, is very desirable. We would play a game together, listen or play music, work on a projects, prepare fun meals together, offer fun – sometimes silly – rewards for tasks accomplished. Always looking to change the mundane. One time in the midst of winter we put down a beach towel in the middle of the living room floor and served dinner on the carpet with good music and whale sounds in the background. We snorkeled for pennies during bath-time and told each other bad knock-knock jokes. We put up a tent in the living room and had a camp out, hotdogs and marshmallows included. I’d send him surprises in his lunch box, anything from love notes to themed lunches like Tahiti salad with colored paper umbrellas, festive oriental paper plates and utensils along with a palm tree decorated juice box.

The bottom line? Attitude is everything; summer is a state of mind. If your children see that you are upbeat, spontaneous, funny, and relaxed not just about their responsibilities but your own as well, that drudgery is an opportunity to be creative, that project can become a venue for learning while multi-dimensionally engaging their innate curiosity about how things work, school blues can be turned into opportunities to reconnect with joy and each other.

Check the climate of your child’s disposition and look to reinvigorate the summer spirit into his/her life. Offer choices whenever possible, trust them with responsibilities that make them feel empowered and reward their efforts.

Please send us your ideas for avoiding the back to school blues to: kosherscene@gmail.com. Why not send us photos of unusual and interesting lunchboxes.

We will publish the best photos and ideas and pick a winner who will receive:

  • 1 carton of juice boxes
  • 1 dozen assorted fruit roll-ups
  • 1 lunch box

SYR

17
Aug
11

Lamb Soup


I like lamb, it is one of my favorite meats. Whether in a soup or in any other form, if a dish has lamb in it I just have to try it. Whether it’s those superb  Slow Roasted Lamb Chops at Mike’s Bistro or the Lamb Soup at Yummy Grill, SYR and I – hardcore carnivores both – are in total agreement that lamb is in a class of its own, we love it!

Recently, while going over some old papers I found cooking notes by my long departed mother in them the following recipe:

Lamb Soup

Yields 4

Ingredients

  • 5 1/2 ounces lean tender lamb
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 5 cups chicken soup
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2 inch piece lemongrass, sliced into very thin rounds
  • 1/4 teaspoon chili paste (I make my own from a recipe I found online, here)
  • 8 cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • 4 scallions, finely sliced
  • 1 3/4 ounces bean sprouts snapped in half
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves
  • 1 tablespoonolive oil.

 Directions
  1. Trim away all the fat from the lamb and slice it thinly. Cut slices into bite sized pieces. Put the meat in a layer on a plate and sprinkle with the garlic and 1 tablespoon soy sauce. Cover it and let marinate for one hour.
  2. In a saucepan bring the chicken stock, ginger, lemongrass, remaining soy sauce and the chili paste. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
  3. When ready to serve the soup, drop the tomatoes, scallions, bean sprouts and cilantro leaves into the stock.
  4. Heat oil in a skillet, add the lamb and marinade. Strir fry the meat until is no longer red and divide among the 4 bowls.
  5. Add the hot soup to each bowl and serve immediately.
Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy. I did!
CS
17
Aug
11

Our Radio Show This Evening – The Kosher Shopaholic


This evening at 8:00pm (Eastern Time), The Kosher Scene Radio Show, will host Suzannah Raff. Mrs. Raff writes The Kosher Shopaholic blog.

Photo by: Irving Schild

Her background includes business degrees from Canada’s McGill and Concordia universities. Her experience as a manufacturer of tznius clothing, her time as project manager for a pioneer VOIP technology company sold to AT&T, in the ’90s, for $1 billion, her chores as a mother, housewife and household manager, her charming personality have more than qualified her on the subject of daily savings. Her perspicacity, practicality and research will make this a very informative and entertaining show.

Categories included in her blog are:

and more.

Some of her posts have covered such diverse subjects as: Newest Jewish App: Power Sefer – Get an eSefer Mishna Free till August 4th, Fun City – A Magical Family Fun Center Opens In NY, Save up to 50% on Kellogs Cereals & Crackers, The Best Chicken Dinner – With a Low Price to Match, Please tune us in this evening at 8:00pm (Eastern Time) this evening. Don’t miss what promises to be a very interesting show filled with money saving tips.

If you missed our show last week with Ezzy Duchman from Jewpon, you can hear it here. The guest was interesting, the subject will also save you money!

Please, don’t forget to tune us in this evening’s for our conversation with the charming, Suzannah Raff, when we will discuss ways to save money without skimping on your shopping, at 8:00pm (Eastern Time). We’ll be wait’n for ya…

CS

16
Aug
11

Boeuf Bourguignon – “One of the Most Delicious Beef Dishes…”


Originating among France’s Burgundy peasantry, this dish was elevated to the status of haute cuisine by none other than the King of Chefs and the Chef of Kings (as the French press and Kaiser Wilhelm II referred to him) – Auguste EscoffierJulia Child in her Mastering the Art of French Cooking, refers to Boeuf Bourguignon as ”certainly one of the most delicious beef dishes concocted by man.”

While looking for a kosher version that might do justice to Ms. Child’s praises, I came across this scrumptious recipe in Lévana Kirschenbaum‘s latest book, The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen, page 164:

Detail of photo by: Meir Pliskin on page 165 of The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen

Boeuf Bourguignon

Spend a wonderful evening with a few French classics and some wine to go with dinner! By the way, my bourguignon has been included in Joan Schwartz’s charming book, deceptively innocent, called Meat and Potatoes. My secret ingredient is crème de cassis, the wonderful black currant liqueur.

This dish reheats very well and improves with age, so go ahead and make it a day or two ahead.

  • 4 pounds beef or bison shoulder, cut into 2 inch cubes for stew
  • 6 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 2 cups dry wine
  • 1/4 cup crème de cassis
  • 2 large tomatoes, diced small
  • 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • 6 bay leaves, or 1 teaspoon ground
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only(or throw in the sprigs in whole, but don’t forget to discard them at the end of cooking)
  •  2 pounds very thin long carrots, peeled (about 20)
  • 20 very small organic potatoes, scrubbed (only organic potatoes are safe with skins on)
  • 2 dozen tiny onions, peeled and left whole (frozen OK: they are already peeled)
On a stove top: Place beef, water, and oil in a heavy, wide-bottom pot. Bring to a boil. Reduce to medium and cook covered for 2 hours. Add the garlic, wine, creme de cassis, tomatoes, pepper, and bay leaves and cook for 30 more minutes. Add thyme, carrots, potatoes, and onions and cook for 30 minutes. The meat should be fork tender, Transfer meat and all vegetables on platter with a slotted spoon. If the liquid left in the pot is too thin, reduce it on a high flame until it is thickened, the consistency of maple syrup. Pour the reduced liquid over the whole dish and serve hot. Will make 8 to 10 servings.
With a Crock-Pot: Layer all the ingredients except the water (no water) in a 6-quart Crock-Pot, in the order they were given. Set the Crock-Pot on low in the morning. It will be ready for dinner (10 to 12 hours total cooking time).
Variation: Try the dish using dark stout beer instead of wine, as my daughter in law Ruthie does.
As you taste this you’ll certainly agree with Julia Child’s assessment. So… enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!
CS



Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 7,815 other followers

Calendar of Posts

August 2011
S M T W T F S
« Jul   Sep »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Archives

Visit our friends at the Kosher Wine Society

Noach: Stranded and Branded

Buy the book…

Category Cloud

18 Restaurant Abigael's baking baking recipes BlogTalkRadio cheese Chef David Kolotkin Chef Jeff Nathan Chef Lévana Chef Lévana Kirschenbaum chicken chicken recipes cookbook authors cookbooks dairy cuisine dairy recipes Esti Berkowitz fine dining fine kosher dining fine kosher dining in Manhattan fine kosher restaurants fine restaurants fish fish recipes Geila Hocherman Gotham Wines & Liquors Internet Radio Irving Schild Jack's Gourmet Jeff Nathan Jewish history Kim Amzallag kosher kosher baking kosher baking recipe kosher baking recipes kosher beef kosher beef recipes kosher cheese kosher chefs kosher chicken dishes kosher chicken recipes kosher cookbook authors kosher cookbooks kosher cookery Kosher cooking kosher cooking classes kosher cooking demos kosher cuisine kosher dairy kosher dairy cuisine kosher dairy recipes kosher desserts kosher dining kosher dining in Brooklyn kosher dining in Manhattan kosher dining in NY kosher fine dining kosher fine wines kosher fish kosher fish recipes Kosher food kosher Italian cuisine kosher meat dishes kosher meat recipes kosher meat restaurants kosher meat restaurants in Manhattan kosher Mediterranean cuisine kosher parve recipes kosher poultry dishes kosher poultry recipes kosher recipes kosher restaurant review Kosher restaurants kosher restaurants in Brooklyn kosher restaurants in Manhattan kosher restaurants in New York City kosher restaurants in NY Kosher Revolution Kosher Scene kosher soup recipes kosher wine kosher wines Lévana Lévana Kirschenbaum meat recipes parve recipes Passover Pomegranate Supermarket poultry poultry recipes Prime Grill Royal Wine Corporation Shavuos recipes Susie Fishbein The Kosher Scene The Kosher Scene Radio Show Uncategorized Wine

BlogTopSites


<a href="//www.blogtopsites.com/food-drink/" title="Food & Drink Blogs" target="_blank"><img style="border:none" src="//www.blogtopsites.com/v_158881.gif" alt="Food & Drink Blogs" />
<a target="_blank" href="//www.blogtopsites.com" style="font-size:10px;">blog sites


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,815 other followers

%d bloggers like this: