Archive for September, 2010

29
Sep
10

Hoshana Rabbah and Shemini Atzeres


On Hoshana Rabbah the chazan or the sheliach tzibbur dons a white kitl as he does on Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur… The Zohar on Vayehi 120a and Terumah 142a tells us that that while we are all judged on Yom Kippur the verdict is not handed down until Shemini Atzeret, but our last chance to do tshuvah is on Hoshana Rabboh

At the end of each of the seven rounds of circling the bet haknesset we stop to hear the blowing of the shofar… This is not one of the Days of Awe yet there are tremendous similarities in the ritual. CHaZa”L never referred to this day as being a Day of Judgment, yet there is a strong hint to back up the Zohar‘s assertion in the fact that in the days of the Temple the sacrifices corresponding to the Days of Judgment and Shmini Atzeret were the same. Some Mahzorim attested to the special status of Hoshana Rabbah in the High Holy Days prayer U-netaneh Tokef, having the following version: “On Rosh ha-Shanah judgment is made, and on Yom Kippur it is written, and on Hoshanah Rabbah it is sealed.” In Romania it was customary to add some other Yamim Nora’im prayers as well to the Amidah for Shemini Atzeret.

Photo by: Yuval Nadav

Professor Yosef Tabori from Bar-Ilan University’s Talmud Department tells us:

Perhaps the closest connection drawn between the Yamim Noraim and Sukkot is found in the motif of the lulav. In antiquity, waving a branch on high was considered a sign of victory. The Sages interpreted our waving of the lulav on Sukkot as signifying the victory of the Jews over Satan on the Days of Judgment that precede the festival. They interpreted the words “delights are ever in Your right hand” (Ps. 16:11) as indicating that a person holding the Four Kinds in his right hand is showing that he emerged victorious on the Day of Judgment (Vayyiqra Rabbah 30.2). One of the earlier sources describing the special status of Hoshanah Rabbah in the synagogue uses this victory imagery:

When Hoshanah Rabbah comes they take willows, and make seven circuits around the synagogue, while the Hazzan of the synagogue stands like an angel of G-d, holding a Torah scroll in his arms as the people march around him as around the altar. For thus our Rabbis taught: every day it was customary to circle the altar reciting, “Please, O Lord, deliver us; please, O Lord, bring success,” and on the seventh day they would march around seven times, as King David said explicitly, as it is written, “I wash my hands in innocence, and walk around Your altar” (Ps. 26:6). Immediately the ministering angels rejoice and proclaim, “the people of Israel are victorious.” (Midrash Tehillim, Buber ed., 17.5)

[..]Thus, the entire period between Rosh ha-Shanah and the last day of Sukkot is a period during which one can still affect the verdict on rain for the better. According to a tradition ascribed to Rabbenu Tam, those who insist on reading the haftarah of Shuvah Yisrael on the Sabbath between Rosh ha-Shanah and Yom Kippur are making a mistake, since this haftarah was set for the Sabbath before Sukkot. The reason is that “Shuvah (Hosea 14:2-10) is directed towards praying for rain, since we conclude [the haftara] with a passage from Joel [the reading, Joel 2:15-27, sounds like an assemblage for prayers for rain and includes the verse “For He has given you the early rain in kindness“] and on Sukkot judgment is passed for the rain, and they are proclaimed before the judges[mentioned in Joel 2:16]” (Mahzor Vitri, p. 224).

In conclusion, even though we are especially enjoined to rejoice during the festival of Sukkot, we must not forget that we are in the process of being judged concerning the rain.

I pray that each one of us has indeed emerged victorious, may this year be one blessed with everything each of us truly needs. May it be a year of health, prosperity, and happiness; may it be a year with no tears, except for tears of joy. May this be the year when peace breaks out triumphant both on a global as well as on each individual’s level!

CS

28
Sep
10

Galupces, Galumpkes, Holishkes, Holipces, Holopches


Stuffed cabbage rolls are known by a variety of names, depending on what part of Europe you or your ancestors came from. The recipes, however, are very similar. Traditionally, though it can be enjoyed on any holiday, it has become a staple on the Simchas Torah table.  My favorite recipe follows:

Aunt Judy’s Holopches (Stuffed Cabbage)

Yields: approximately 20 pieces

Ingredients

  • 1 large head green cabbage(outer leaves are for rolls, chop up remainder into long
    pieces)
  • 1 bottle or package of sauerkraut (tightly squeeze out liquid)
  • 1 medium onion grated
  • 1 medium onion thinly sliced
  • 1/4 tsp of finely chopped garlic
  • 1 lb ground lean beef
  • 1/2 cup long grain rice,
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 2 raw eggs lightly beaten
  • 2 Tbsp sweet Hungarian paprika
  • 1½ tsp salt, or salt to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • ¼ tsp peppercorns
  • 1 Tbsp. paprika
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup water mixed with 1 cup tomato puree
  • ½ lb salami cubed (optional)
  • Pinch sour salt

Directions

  1. Remove core of cabbage head, place cabbage head in a large pot of water, bringing to boil.
  2. Cook until the outer leaves begin to loosen and soften.
  3. Remove loose softened leaves and return rest till more leaves are softened.
  4. Repeat till all leaves for rolls are removed.
  5. Trim thick veins on larger cooked leaves.
  6. Chop center core leaves for sauté.
  7. Mix beef with eggs, rice, grated onions salt, pepper in bowl.
  8. Put a handful of meat mixture into center of each cabbage leaf, roll it up and tuck in
    sides.
  9. Prepare all stuffed cabbage leaves.

Rue

  • 4 Tbsp oil
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 4 Tbsp flour
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper
  • 1/4 tsp garlic
  • Pinch of salt

Preparation

  1. Sauté in a separate pan till golden brown.
  2. Then stir in water and tomato puree.
  3. In large pot, sauté sliced onion in oil till translucent.
  4. Add sauerkraut, shredded cabbage, seasoning and salt.
  5. Place the cabbage rolls seam side down.
  6. Cover with remainder of chopped cabbage.
  7. Add peppercorns and bay leaf.
  8. Slow cook on low-medium until mixture begins to bubble.
  9. Simmer for approximately 3 hours.

Aunt Judy is an incredible balabusta, baker and cook. In her younger years, on yomim tovim and simchas, her house was always full of guests, the table arrayed with the most delicious home made foods. Stuffed cabbage was a standard on Chanukah, Purim and Simchas Torah No one made it better!!!

SYR

27
Sep
10

18 Restaurant’s Yemenite Meat Soup


We’ve raved before about 18 Restaurant‘s Yemenite Meat Soup, Tammy Cohen has graciously agreed to share the recipe, as prepared by 18‘s Chef Haim Dadi, with our readers:

Eighteen’s Yemenite Meat Soup, a complete meal all by itself!

Ingredients:

2 large onions

2 lbs Flanken meat

Salt

Black Pepper

Cumin

Paprika

Turmeric

1 tsp fresh garlic ground down

1 small bunch cilantro

4 medium to large potatoes

2 whole carrots

Cooking Instructions:

Finely chop onions and combine with flanken. Put in large pot with 4 quarts of water. Boil together for 20 minutes. Next add a pinch of salt, pinch of pepper, pinch of paprika, pinch of cumin, pinch of turmeric with cilantro and garlic to pot and boil for another 20 minutes. Take 4 potatoes and cut into 6 pieces each, slice carrots and put into pot with above.

Cook everything together for 20 more minutes on a low flame. Soup is ready, add more salt to taste if necessary.

It will certainly warm you on a windy day, sitting in the Sukkah, or try it anytime. Enjoy!

CS

Yemenite Meat Soup

26
Sep
10

Some of the Restaurants with Sukkahs


18 Restaurant (240 E 81st St, New York NY10065; Tel: 212.517.2400) Sukkah on Wheels, parked in front of the restaurant.

etc steakhouse (1409 Palisade Avenue; Teaneck, NJ 07666; Telephone: 201.357.5677).

Le Marais (150 West 46th Street – Between 6th and 7th Ave – New York, NY 10036; Tel: 212.869.0900) Sukkah seats 25, no reservations taken.

Olympic Pita (58 West 38th Street; New York, NY 10018; Telephone: 212.869.7482) Sukkah for up to 15 people.

Prime Grill (60 East 49th Street; New York, NY 10017; Telephone: 212.692.9292) Giant sukkah, seats up to 90 people.

Smokey Joe’s (494 Cedar Lane; Teaneck, NJ. 07666; Telephone: 201.836.7427). They will be making their special Mediterranean Lamb Stew with Cauliflower and White Beans for Sukkot. It is made with their own smokey, lamb merguez sausage. It is the perfect dish for the sukkah because you can make it very hot and keep it covered in a dutch oven while sitting in your sukkah. You and the stew will stay warm! $13.99 a lb. And with yom tov being 2 days at a time, so Smokey Joe’s is also presenting a two-fer, order any of this items and the second is on the house:

BBQ Chicken
Quart of Beef Chili
BBQ Meatloaf – 1lb

Limit of only one to a party

Shalom Bombay’s Sukkot Take-out Special

Photo by: Koshertopia

Shalom Bombay, has no Sukkah at either the newly opened Manhattan or at the original Teaneck locations. They do offer a choice of two succulent take out menus, however:

Menu #1

Service for 8 people: $150 / Service for 12 people $210

Choice of soup
Tandoori Chicken
Beef Korma
Vegetable Curry
Basmati Rice
Naan Bread

Menu #2

Service for 8 people: $200 / Service for 12 people $290

Choice of soup
Vegetable Samosa
Chicken Tikka Masala
Tandoori Beef
Vegetable Kofta Curry
Basmati Rice
Naan Bread
Rice Pudding

Great additions to enhance your holiday meal

Lollypop Chicken Platter: $50 small tray / $95 large tray
Vegetable Appetizer Platter:
$50 small tray / $95 large tray
Dum Aloo Kasmiri:
$50 small tray / $95 large tray
(Potatoes stuffed with dry fruits, mildly spiced and cooked in a tomato sauce)

Shalom Special Naan (Stuffed bread with dried fruit): $4/order
Carrot Pudding:
$4/order

CS

21
Sep
10

Shalom Bombay


Say Namaste as you enter Shalom Bombay (344 Lexington Avenue – between 39th and 40th – New York, NY 10016 – Tel: 212.922.0224 – Fax: 212.922.0124) this exotic Indian adventure.  Above your head flows the Ganges – the life force of a nation. The environment is earthy with touches of scrolled ironwork wall pieces, and the tables are set simply- as all guests are welcomed with an introductory taste of a dish called Papri Chaat, complements of the house.

Papri Chaat

It consists of crispy crackers served with chopped potatoes, onions, parve sour cream and tamarind sauce – served cold. Mildly spicy and flavorful, it set the stage for the rest rest of the meal.

SYR and I washed and sampled their breads. SYR adored the warm, fresh from the oven Tandoori Paratha bread (a multi-layered flat whole wheat bread), while I had their just baked Onion Kulcha. Both were superb!

SYR chose a Chicken Tikka Masala, while I had their Tawa Chicken. Hers was made with barbecued chicken cooked in tomatoes and onion. Very flavorful, a bit spicey, but definitely interesting.

Tawa Chicken

Having grown up in Uruguay, I am more used to spicy food and my Chicken Tawa came with boneless pieces of chicken served with onion, bell peppers and spices. I liked it!!

We then shared their Vegetable Pakoras…

Vegetable Pakoras

…an assortment of deep-fried spinach, eggplant, cauliflower and potatoes. Frankly, cauliflower was never a favorite of mine, yet… fresh deep fried is just so good when it’s done right.

We segued with their Mixed Kabab Tandoori Platter

Mixed Kebab Tandoori Platter

It comes with an assortment of lamb, beef and chicken kababs marinated and roasted in a clay oven. We both found the various meats flavorful, tender  and wonderfully spiced.

SYR enjoyed a 2009 Herzog Selection, Chateneuf Rouge. A semi sweet, mildly fruity but dry enough wine that amply complimented her dishes. I had the 2007 Galilee Hills Segal Fusion (with 60% Merlot, 20% Cabernet Franc and 20% Sauvignon Blanc), with a somewhat smoky undercurrent and lots of fruitiness, I found it a perfect companion to these spicy foods.

We both finished our meals with their exotic desserts, SYR had the Rice Pudding, served with almonds, pistachios and raisins, which she found unusually tasty. I had the Moong Daal Fudge dessert – mashed lentils cooked with sugar and nuts – it was just sweet enough without being overpowering.  Kind of likea sweet version of kishka- nice and very tasty, I wish it had been a bit creamier though.

It was a great meal, coupled with good wines and great decor. We just have to come back for more, but next time I plan to have some of their Indian beers. I hear the Kingfisher is unusually tasty, spicy… just made for these type of food!

Don’t wait for monsoon season to try this superb gastronomic delight; it’s sure to become a fast favorite when you’re ready to curry favor with family and friends or spice up your evening out.

CS

Shalom Bombay on Urbanspoon

16
Sep
10

Chicken and Fruit Fricassee


Chef Jeff Nathan, owner /Chef of Abigael’s on Broadway sent us one of his favorite yom tov recipes:

Chicken and Fruit Fricassee

Ingredients:

  • ¾ cup dry figs
  • ¾ cup dry apricots, diced
  • ¾ cup golden raisins
  • 2 cups water, warm
  • ¼ cup brandy
  • pinch saffron
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • saffron
  • 2 3 pound chickens, cut into eighths
  • 2 onions, diced medium
  • 2 tablespoons garlic, chopped
  • 1 28 oz. can crushed tomatoes
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper

Directions

  1. In a small bowl combine the dry fruits with the water.
  2. Set aside and allow to plump at least 30 minutes.
  3. Drain and reserve the fruit water.
  4. In a separate small bowl, combine the brandy with the saffron & cinnamon.
  5. Allow to steep 20 – 30 minutes. Stir well.
  6. Dredge the chicken pieces in flour.
  7. In a large sauté pan of hot olive oil, brown the chicken on both sides.
  8. Transfer chicken to an ovenproof casserole.
  9. Pour off most of the remaining oil.
  10. Add the onions and garlic.
  11. Stir occasionally and cook until translucent.
  12. Add the dry fruits, tomato, brandy mix and reserved fruit water.
  13. Using a whisk, scrape the bottom of the pan for the pan drippings.
  14. Pour the sauce over the chicken.
  15. Bake, uncovered at 350˚ F. for approximately 1 hour; or until the chicken is cooked through and sauce has thickened slightly.
  16. Serve with couscous, rice pilaf, or herb simmered new potatoes.

Well, gentle reader, having eaten quite a few delightful lunches and dinners at Abigael‘s, having tried a lot of the recipes in Jeff Nathan’s Family Suppers, I know this one will be a special treat and… I plan to have in the Sukkah!

CS

Chicken and Fruit Fricassee

14
Sep
10

Hooray!!!


We are now a featured blog on both Urbanspoon.com AND on Foodista.com

The Kosher Scene North Jersey restaurants

KosherScene

13
Sep
10

Maple Roasted Pears and Sweet Potatoes and More


Susie Fishbein, best selling kosher cookbook author, graciously consented to share two of her recipes – from  her upcoming Kosher By Design – Teens and 20-Somethings – with our readers. I tried the first one last evening, after the fast, and loved it (and… I’m quite a few hours past my 20-somethings):

Maple Roasted Pears and Sweet Potatoes

DAIRY OR PARVE – YIELDS 6 SERVINGS

I adore these soft sweet pears and the way the sweet potatoes become sticky and sweet. You can try this with cubed butternut squash in addition to or in place of the sweet potatoes. While you have the maple syrup on hand, put the Pineapple Maple Glazed Salmon (page 134) on your menu for another night.

Ingredients

  • 8 mini pears, such as Seckel, or 4 ripe Anjou pears, peeled, halved, cored, quartered
  • 3 large sweet potatoes, (about 2 pounds) peeled, halved lengthwise, and cut into
    chunks the same size as the pears
  • 6 tablespoons butter or margarine
  • 1 cup pure maple syrup, NOT pancake syrup
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon coarse sea salt or kosher salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325˚F.
  2. For easy cleanup, completely cover a jelly roll pan with aluminum foil. Set aside.
  3. As you cut up the pears and sweet potato, place them into a large bowl. Set
    aside.
  4. In a medium pot, melt the butter or margarine over medium heat. Whisk in maple
    syrup and salt. Cook until it starts to bubble.
  5. Remove from heat. Pour over the pears and sweet potatoes. Toss to coat.
    Transfer to prepared pan
  6. Bake, uncovered, for 11⁄2 hours.
  7. Transfer to a serving bowl or platter.

…and one more, can’t wait to try it!

Pineapple Maple Glazed Salmon

PARVE – YIELDS 6 SERVINGS

Ingredients

  • 6 (6-ounce) salmon fillets, without skin, pin bones removed
  • 1⁄4 cup maple syrup (NOT pancake syrup)
  • 1⁄4 cup crushed pineapple, from a small can, squeezed dry
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 cloves fresh garlic, minced

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375˚F.
  2. Rinse the salmon and place it on a parchment-lined jelly roll pan. Pat dry with
    paper towels.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk the maple syrup, pineapple, soy sauce, mustard, olive
    oil, and garlic.
  4. Pour over the salmon and bake, uncovered, for 15 minutes.
  5. Transfer to serving platter. Drizzle with pan juices. Serve hot or at room
    temperature.

Enjoy, gentle reader, enjoy!!

CS

Maple Roasted Pears and Sweet Potatoes

08
Sep
10

Yom Tov Recipes – Personal Honeyed Chocolate Lava Cake


Pastry Chef Ehud Ezra, gave us this delicious recipe for yom tov. SYR and I got to taste it yesterday, thus, we can attest to it being  truly scrumptious without being overly sweet. One of the joys of this type of post is being in the company of such gifted chefs and bakers. Udi, as his friends and coworkers lovingly nicknamed him, is a warm hearted chemist and chocolate alchemist.  He’s got such a mastery of ingredients and technique mixed with a sensitive spirituality that reflects his soul in everything he bakes. His Rosh HaShana recipe for Honeyed Chocolate Lava Cake certainly demonstrates his unique talents as a master pastry chef.

Honeyed Chocolate Lava Cake

Yields 10 mini 5 ozs. portions made in 4″ muffin molds

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lbs. butter/margarine/Earth Balance
  • 1 1/2 lbs. semi sweet chocolate
  • 2 tspns. vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 7 whole eggs
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • Confectioners sugar

Directions

  1. Melt butter, 1 1/2 minutes in microwave, add chopped chocolate, mix until incorporated but not too hot add vanilla extract and honey.
  2. In mixer whip eggs until they form high peaks, about 3-4 minutes.
  3. Fold with chocolate mix.
  4. Spray pans with canola oil. Scoop in batter until the top of pans (batter rises and then deflates).
  5. Put in oven at 400 F, for 12 to 15 minutes, until top is crusted.
  6. Sprinkle tops with confectioners sugar. Serve with 4 scoops of Rich’s whipped cream or vanilla ice cream w/honey on top.

Easy to make and fast to bake, if you make you’ll shine whether with your guests or even with your family.

Enjoy it, gentle reader, we certainly did!

CS

Honeyed Chocolate Lava Cake

x———)o0O0o(———x

KTIVAH VECHATIMA TOVAH!!!
SHANA TOVAH UMETUKA!!!
A GUT GEBENTSHT YOHR!!!

07
Sep
10

“May it be Your Will…” – Symbolic Foods


It is customary to eat symbolic foods on Rosh Hashana, these symbols represent the individual’s requests for a better life for one self, for one’s family, etc… How did the custom begin?  The Talmud in Tractate Krisus states on page 6a: “Now that you say that an omen means something, each person should accustom himself to eat gourds, fenugreek, leeks, beets and dates…” As a result, we partake of these and other foods, all representing good things and the individual’s hopes for more and better. The foods mentioned are of types that grow fast and/or are very sweet.

Why do we eat them on Rosh Hashana, specifically, as opposed to any other time of the year? When we ask the Almighty to grant us something, just as when we would ask a king to give us something, we must invoke some merit or reason why we feel we deserve it. Therefore, these foods serve as a reminder that we must do tshuvah – repentance. Rosh Hashana being the time when the Almighty looks at the past year’s deeds and when we ask to be inscribed in the Book of Life, it is – of course – a time of self examination and repentance. Thus, these foods serve to remind us of our pressing need to repent, to resolve to be better and stronger Jews for the coming New Year.

These symbols blend in with the spirit of Rosh Hashana, as as Rabbi Yehuda Prero says on torah.org:

…If one looks over the prayers on Rosh HaShana, one will find that the basic theme is one of proclaiming the kingship and greatness of Hashem. Although Rosh HaShana is the day on which we are being judged, we do not make requests for sustenance, health, long life, etc.. We instead demonstrate how we have accepted Hashem as our king, and that we will listen to Him and follow His dictates.

By asking Hashem for our needs we obviously acknowledge Him as our King, upon whom we depend as the source of life, as the source of everything on this plane (and every other) plane of existence. The omens are a way of covertly asking the Boreh Olam – Creator of the Universe for our needs without being too blatant about it.

Immediately preceding each of these  foods we say a “Yehi ratzon – may it be Your will…” Each food, whether through a pun on its name, or through its very nature, alludes to our request.

A holiday plate with traditional symbolic foods

The Yehi ratzons are as follows:

“Yehi Ratzon Milfanecha, Ad-noi El-heinu Vei’l-hai Avosainu…”

“May it be Your will, Hashem our G-d and the G-d of our forefathers…”

For fenugreek (most Ashkenazim use carrots, in yiddish Mehren – which can also mean “to increase,”):

“…Sheiyirbu zechuyosainu.”

“…that our merits increase.”

For leek or cabbage:

“…Sheiyikarsu sonainu.”

“…that our enemies be decimated.”

For beets:

“…Sheiyistalku oyvainu.”

“…that our adversaries disappear”

For dates:

“…Sheyitamu sonainu.”

“…that our enemies be consumed.”

For gourd:

“…Sheyikora gzar dinainu vyikaru lefanecha zechuyosainu.”

“…that the decree of our sentance be torn up and may our merits be proclaimed before you.”

For the apple in the honey:

“…shetichadesh aleinu shana tova umtuka.”

“…that you renew us for a good and sweet year.”

For pomegranate:

“…shenirbeh zechuyos kerimon”

“…that our merits increase like (the seeds of) a pomegranate.”

For fish:

“…Shenifreh vnirbeh kedagim.”

“…that we be fruitful and multiply like fish.”

For the head of a fish or sheep:

“…Shenihiyeh lerosh velo lezanav.”

“…that we be as the head and not as the tail.”

There are also many personal symbols that some people add, for example among some of my relatives it’s long been customary to have a lettuce leave, half a raisin and a piece of celery stalk… What is the pun and its meaning? “May it be Your will, Hashem our G-d and the G-d of our forefathers, to let us have a raise in salary.

Do you have any personal or family symbols you add on Rosh Hashana? Please share them with the rest of us, we’d like to see them!

May this be the year, when everyone of us is granted all of his/her needs, as we acknowledge Hashem’s kingship!

CS




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